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Full text of "Quincy Sun July - Dec 1974"

GRAPHIC MICR()FILA\ 



spauldinq 



company 



ON ROUTE 128 AT 1560 TRAPELO RD., WALTHAM, MASS. 02154 



Thomas Crane Public Library 

Box 379 

Quincy, Mass. 02169 




Vol. 6 No. 42 
Wednesday, July 3, 1974 



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HERO'S REWARD - Aixkew Carrera. 12. receives a Senate citation from Sen. Arthur H. Tobin for his 
rescue of a youngster about to be hit by a truck last fall. Looking on are Ambrose Milford, president of 
the Willard School PTA, and the boy's proud parents. Mr. and Mrs. Gildo Carrera. Presentation was made 
during graduation ceremonies at the Willard School. [Story on Page 2] 

[Quincy Sun Photo by Laban Whittaker] 

'People Very Cooperative' 

Mixed Trash-Garbage 
Off To Smooth Start 



"We assume that there was 
garbage in the collections," said 
Public Works Commissioner 
James J. Ricciuti. "You really 
couldn't teU." 

It was Ricciuti's way of saying 
that opening day of the 
controversial mixed garbage and 
rubbish collections in Quincy 
went off without a hitch 
Monday. 

Ricciuti and Joseph Shea, 
Mayor Hannon's executive 
secretary, were up at 5 a.m. and 
rode the collection route 
through Houghs Neck, Adams 
Shore, Germantown, 
Merry mount and parts of 
WoUaston with the collectors. 

"We saw a few barrels that 
apparently had been knocked 
over by the wind during the 
night," said Ricciuti. 

"And we saw one dog 
working on a plastic bag. There 
was no garbage in it but there 
was some paper with meat 
drippings. 

"It was a normal, everyday 



sidewalk operation along one of 
the largest collection routes in 
the city. 

"The disposal part of the 
operation was normal, too. 
There was no additional trash." 

In addition to Ricciuti and 
Shea, a superintendent, a general 
foreman and three other 
foremen monitored the first 
day's collections. 

"We'll do this for 30 days," 
said Ricciuti, "although I 
personally don't believe we'll 
have to do it that long. 

"People were very 
cooperative. 

"But I might suggest that they 
tie the tops of their plastic bags. 
Sometimes the wind can tip 
them over." 

Ward 4 Councillor James A. 
Sheets, the leading critic of the 
mixed collections, declined to 
comment on the first day's 
operation. He said he had no 
reports from the route and it 
was too early to tell. 

Shortly before collections 
were made, an ordinance 



introduced two months ago by 
Ward 1 Councillor Leo J. Kelly 
quietly went into effect banning 
the placement of rubbish outside 
more than 15 hours before 
collections. 

Kelly, in whose ward 
collections started Monday, said 
a lot of the rubbish was put out 
very early in the morning instead 
of the night before and he 
expressed surprise at the small 
number of dogs in the streets 
Monday. 

"Someone from City Hall 
must have been down talking to 
them," he quipped. 

Kelly said he is still opposed 
to the mixed collections but he 
added, "I was quite surprised by 
what I saw this morning." 

The City Council on June 3 
passed unanimously a resolution 
opposing Mayor Walter J. 
Hannon's plan for mixed 
collections. 

Meanwhile, efforts were being 
made in the State Legislature 
and in the courts to have the 
collections halted. 



Field Days, Parades, Concerts 
To Mark 4th Celebration 



Quincy residents will 
observe the 198th anniversary 
of American Independence 
tomorrow [Thursday 1 with 
field days, parades and band 
concerts in neighborhood 
parks througliout the city. 

The long-range forecast 
was for good weather. 

The celebrations include: 

HOUGHS NECK 
LaBrecque Playground from 
1 1 a.m. to 6 p.m., sponsored 
by the Houghs Neck 
Community Council. 

WEST QUINCY 
O'Rourke Playground from 8 
a.m. to 6 p.m., sponsored by 
the Morrisette Legion Post. 



QUINCY POINT - Fore 
River Field from 10 a.m. to 6 
p.m., sponsored by the Ward 
II Civic Association. 

SQUANTUM - Wendall 
Moses Playground from 9 
a.m. to 9 p.m., sponsored by 
the Squantum Fourth of July 
Committee. 

SOUTH QUINCY - Faxon 
Park from 8 a.m. to 6 p.m., 
sponsored by the Adams 
Heights Men's Club. 

ADAMS SHORE - Heron 
Rd Playground and Beach 
from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. with a 
band concert from 8 p.m. to 
1 1 p.m., sponsored by the 
Adams Shore Community 



Association. 

GERMANTOWN - Baker 

Beach from 9 a.m. to 4:30 

p.m. 

MERRYMOUNT - Pageant 
Field from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m., 
sponsored by the Wollaston 
Women's Club; Merrymount 
Beach from 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. 
featuring a Miss Merrymount 
contest. 

There will also be band 
concerts tonight 
[Wednesday] from 7 p.m. to 
10 p.m. at Merrymount 
Beach, and from 6 p.m. to 
8:30 p.m. at Fore River 
Field. 



$60,000 Start 

Mini-Parks For 

Downtown Area 

Improvement 

By TOM HENSHAW 

A section of Hancock Street at the intersection of 
Cliveden St. is to be narrowed and coverted into a stretch 
of mini-parlcs as the next phase in the improvement of the 
downtown area. 



Work is expected to begin 
sometime after the Sidewalk 
Basaar [July 18-20] and be 
completed before back-to-school 
sales start in late August. 

City Development 
Coordinator John Cheney said 
each side of Hancock St. will be 
narrowed by about the width of 
an automobile for about 100 
feet in order to create a concept 
of "a living room out doors." 

"We plan to plant mature 
trees along Hancock St.," he 
said. "We will have benches 
surrounded by brick pavement 
and greenery with low lighting 
so that people can sit on the 
benches and read in the 
evening." 

The work will cost some 
$60,000 with the money coming 
from the funds remaining from 
the bond issue for the parking 



garage. Architect John Donahue 
is working on the plans now. 

Cheney said the development 
will not interfere with traffic on 
Hancock St. or Cliveden St., 
which has two-way traffic in and 
out of the Ross parking area 
even after it was narrowed last 
year. 

"Hancock St. will lose a few 
parking spaces on the easterly 
side," said Cheney. 

Cheney said the work is not 
the first step in making a mall of 
Hancock Street. 

"But the same concepts can 
be applied up and down 
Hancock St.," he said, 
"particularly at the intersections 
of Granite St. and School St. 

"It is only a move to allow 
people on foot to co-exist with 
cars on Hancock Street." 



Over 1,000 Apply 
For Food Stamps 



Considerably more than 1,000 
have applied for a chance to 
stretch their food dollars in this 
area as the new federal food 
stamp program went into effect 
Monday [July 1]. 

At the last count taken June 
25 welfare offices had received 
832 applications from public 
assistance clients and 127 
applications from persons not on 
public assistance. 

And the number is expected 
to increase substantially when 
this week's count becomes 
available. 

So reports Arthur DePietro, 
Community Service Board 
Chairman and Paul Provencher, 
South Shore Community Service 
Center. 



Provencher explained that the 
program, like Medicaid and the 
out-going "Surplus Food" 
program, is available both to 
welfare recipients and to other 
persons of limited income. 

"It is different however," he 
added, "because it is not 
completely 'free'. Food Stamps 
have to be bought and paid for 
at a participating bank, then 
brought to a participating food 
store, where they are worth 
much more than the cash 
amount paid for them." 

Eligibility depends on many 
factors, particularly net income, 
size of family and certain 
expenses like shelter, utilities, 
and education. An individual or 
[Cont'd on Page 11] 



Council Votes For 
New Hospital Job 



The City Council has voted to 
create the position of "Evening 
Supervisor for Administration" 
at Quincy City Hospital and to 
appropriate $1 1,291 to fund the 
post. 

The vote was 5-2 at a meeting 
Friday with Councillors Warren 
Powers and James Sheets 
dissenting. 

Councillor John J. Quinn, 
whose son, John, Jr., is being 
considered for the job, and 
Councillor Clifford Marshall did 
not vote. 

Voting for the job were 
Council President Arthur Tobin 
and Councillors Joseph LaRaia, 



Leo Kelly, John Lydon and 
Dennis Harrington. 
The proposal read: 

"Upon the request of the 
[Quincy City] Hospital Board of 
Managers and with the 
recommendation of the Mayor, 
the sum of $11,291 is hereby 
appropriated from available 
funds within the 1974-1975 
Hospital Administration 
Personal Services Account for 
the purpose of establishing the 
position of "Evening Supervisor 
for Administration" in lieu of 
the position of administrative 
assistant to the Director." 



Seniors Hot Lunch 
To Cost 60 Cents July 15 



The price of a meal in the 
Senior Citizens Hot Lunch 
Program in Quincy is going up a 
dime, from 50 cents to 60 cents, 
effective July 15. 

Putnam S. Borden, executive 
director of the Quincy Council 
on Aging, said the increase, 
voted by the council June 27, is 
necessary because of the 



continuing rise in food prices. 

But he held out one hopeful 
note for the future. 

When subsidized funds from 
the state expected during the 
coming fiscal year finally 
become available, he said, the 
price will be returned to the 
original 50-cent level. 



11'./ 



Page 2 Quincy Sun Wednesday, July 3, 1974 




Published weekly on Thursday by 

The Quincy Sun Publishing Company 

1601 Hancock St., Quincy, Massachusetts 02169 

Publisher and Editor 

Henry W. Bosworth, Jr. 

Advertising Director 

John B. Powers 

10^ Per Copy - $4.00 Per Year - Out of State $5.00 Per Year 

Telephone: 471-3100 471-3101 471-3102 

Second-Class Postage Paid at Boston, Mass. 

MEMBER NEW ENGLAND PRESS ASSOCIATION 

The Quincy Sun assumes no financial responsibility for 
typographical errors in advertisements but will reprint that part of 
an advertisement in which the typographical error occurs. 




THESE HOURS 

ARE TEMPORARILY 

OURS 



Main Office 
440 Hancock St., North Quincy 773-8100 
Open Daily 9 - 3 
Friday 9-5:30 



Branch Office 
100 Granite St., Downtown 471-3900 
Open Daily 11-8 
Friday 11-8 

Closed Saturdays during July and August 



GiSnit^ 
co-qper^ive^ 




12-Year Old Andy Carrera 
Hero To Willard School Classmates 



Willard School graduated a 
class of 63 sixth graders - one a 
hero. 

Andrew Carrera, son of Mr. 
and Mrs. Gildo Carrera, 9 
Buckley St., received a placque 
from Mayor Walter Hannon and 
a Senate citation from Senator 
Arthur Tobin, praising the 
youth's heroic rescue of 
first-grader James Daly, son of 
Mr. and Mrs. James Daly, 3 
Montillio St. 

Andy, 12, was awarded both 
placque and citation at 
graduation ceremonies held last 
week. The placque inscription 
read: 

"Dear Andy, 

On October 1, 1973, your 
quick thinking saved your 
classmate James Daly.. .from 
being hit by a truck in the 
Willard schoolyard. Your heroic 
action is indeed commendable, 
for when a moment's hesitation 
may have proved fatal, you 
instinctively came to the aid of 
your classmate. 

On behalf of the citizens of 
Quincy, I officially commend 
you for your courageous effort." 

The special Senate citation, 
signed by Kevin Harrington, 
president of the Sante, Edward 
O'Neill, Senate clerk and Arthur 
Tobin, read: 



"Be it resolved that the Mass. 
Senate hereby extends its 
congratulations to Andrew 
Carrera, a student of the sixth 
grade at the Willard School, 
Quincy, in recognition of his 
unselfish, heroic action in 
rescuing a classmate who was in 
imminent danger of being 
injured by the wheels of a truck. 

"And be it further resolved 
that the Mass. Senate extends 
best wishes for continuing 
success and that a record of 
these resolutions be entered in 
the journal of the Senate and a 
copy thereof be transmitted by 
the senate clerk and 
parlimentarian." 

On that day in October, 
Jimmy Daly had hidden behind 
the wheel of a milk delivery 
truck. Andy noticed the 
youngster hiding there, and as 
the truck began to back up, 
Andy pulled Jimmy from under 
the moving vehicle. 

An annual spaghetti supper 
was served in honor of the 
graduates. During the evening, 
diplomas were granted. 

Graduates, parents and guests 
were entertained with a 
student-created fashion show 
and a rock combo comprised of 
former Willard School students. 



Sixth graders receiving 
diplomas were: 

Stephanie Assad, Robert 
Buckley, Andrew Carrera, Susan 
DeCelle, Mary DiMarco, Lynne 
Gallery, Jeff Heath, Mark Kelly, 
Ambrose Milford, Paul Orlando, 
Kathleen Park, Suzanne Ponder, 
Richard Ryan, Joanne Rydings, 
Kathleen Sacchetti, Charles 
Sylva, John Warner, Mark 
Westland, Thomas Wye. 

Jody Archer, Stanley Benson, 
John Cantelli, Kathleen Clark, 
Donna Ekbom, Laura Jellow, 
James Key, Kathleen Kleimola, 
Mary LaRosa, Colleen Marshall, 
Theresa McKeon. 

Arnold Aho, Debra Aluisy, 
William Barrus, Donna Bates, 
John Bryan, Joseph Callahan, 
William Gustin, Theresa 
Harrison, Joseph Kelliher. 

Kerry Kirk, Camilla Lorina, 
Susan Mahan, Jeffrey Mahn, 
Tarya Malkki, Jeffrey Newman, 
Kathleen Nicklas, Veronica 
O'Brien, Robert Oldro, Susan 
Persson, David Preston, Robert 
Romano, Joyce Suikola. 

Mark Oldro, Darren Quirk, 
Nanci Reilly, Jane Righini, 
Charles Romano, Sarah 
Shephard, Timothy Springer, 
Cindy Staples, Robert Stewart, 
Paul Tervakoski, William 
Wightman. 



6 Civic Groups Plan 'Citizens Seminar' 



Plans have been finalized by 
the presidents of six active 
Quincy civic-community 
organizations to conduct a 
"Citizens Seminar" at a joint 
meeting of the groups at the 
Lincoln-Hancock Community 
School July 9, at 8 p.m. 

The six presidents met 
recently to formulate plans for 
the joint meeting and to develop 
an agenda. Pat DiStefano, 
president of the Quincy Citizens 
Association was named chairman 
pro tem by the others. 

The other presidents are: 

Donald Macleod, Cranch Hill 
Association; Bernice Mader, 
South Quincy Civic Association; 



Jeffrey Isaacson, South-West 
Community Council; Robert D. 
Meenan, St. Moritz Association; 
Timothy P. Cardwell, Quincy 
Taxpayers Revolt. 

The purpose of the seminar, 
the first to be held in the city, is 
to hear how issues affect 
geographical areas of the city, 
with resident input and 
comments forming a major part 
of the forum. 

The presidents expressed a 
feeling that many areas of 
concern will be discussed with 
Freedom Park, building height 
limitations, South Quincy 
MBTA, Quarry St. development, 
flood plain zoning and the 



combined rubbish-garbage 
collection among the key topics 
planned by the leaders. 

"The seminar will be opened 
with a brief presentation by each 
president outlining views on one 
or two issues affecting his area 
and group. Following the 
presentations, the audience will 
be invited to ask questions with 
a general discussion to conclude. 
The membership of each group 
will be invited and the seminar is 
open to the public. 

It is expected that the 
meeting will serve as a 
work-shop fo' annual gatherings 
to include an additional number 
of Quincy organizations." 



City To Present Annual $1,000 Scholarship 



Mayor Walter J. Hannon 
announces an annual scholarship 
of $1,000 for Quincy residents 
who are entering or presently in 
graduate work in the Arts and 
Sciences. 

The funding for the 
scholarship was made available 
by the Sons of Italy, Quincy 
Lodge 1295. 

Hannon said the money. 



which will be donated annually 
by the Sons of Italy, will be used 
to establish a scholarship with 
the following stipulations: 

Recipient must be a resident 
01 i>ie city of Quincy for a 
period of three years. 

• Recipient must be a 
full-time student entering or 
presently doing graduate work in 
the Arts and Sciences. 



• Recipient must show a 
financial need. 

• The scholarship may be 
awarded to one or two persons, 
but not more than two. 

• All applications, letters and 
transcripts must be submitted on 
or before Aug. 1, to the Mayor's 
office. City Hall. 

Applications may be obtained 
in the Mayor's office. 



Adams Heights Men's Club Plans 4th Events 



The Adams Heights Men's 
Club will sponsor traditional 4th 
of July festivities at Faxon Park 
Thursday. 

The celebration will begin at 
10 a.m. with free hot dogs, tonic 
and ice cream. 



FILL OUT THIS SUBSCRIPTION BLANK AND MAIL 

TO THE QUINCY SUN 1101 HANCOCK ST.: QUINCY 02119 
S2 ISSUES FOR $4.00 





At 1 p.m., sack races and 
three-legged races will start. 
Youngsters from 3 to 10 may 
compete for prizes. Several races 
are scheduled according to the 
age of the youngsters. 

Later in the afternoon, 
husbands and wives will team up 



SUBSCRIPTION FORM 



in egg throwing competition. 
Prizes will be awarded. 

The day's events have been 
planned by a committee of the 
Mens Club. Members are Vincent 
Contrino, Louis Contrino and 
Ted McLelland. 




STATE 



ZIP CODE 



CHECK ONE OF TWO BOXES BELOW 

( 1 ENCLOSED IS MY CHECK FOR $4.00 
I ] PLEASE BILL ME FOR $4.00 

OUT OF STATE $5.00 



Hearing July 16 



Wednesday, July 3, 1974 Quincy Sun Page 3 



City Faces Court Action In Refusal To Pay Nurse 



By MARY ANN DUGGAN 

The city of Quincy is being 
taken to court over its refusal to 
pay $1,000 sick leave pay to a 
75-year-old retired Quincy 
Hospital registered nurse. 

The court action by the 
Massachusetts Nurses 
Association follows an 
arbitrator's decision handed 
down last March favorable to 
Mrs. Frances Kemp of 199 
Upland Rd. 

The MNA says an arbitrator's 
decision is "^nal and binding on 
both parties" by state law. 

The city has balked at paying 
Mrs. Kemp who will be 76 in 
September, claiming she is not a 
retired employee on the grounds 
she is not eligible for a pension. 

Mrs. Kemp worked as an 
evening staff nurse at Quincy 
City Hospital from Jan. 2, 1962 
until Sept. 1, 1973. She was 63 
when she began her duties. 

According to Mrs. Ruth 
Paven, Quincy's representative in 
the Massachusetts Nurses 
Association, Boston, Mrs. Kemp 
was therefore unable to join the 
municipal retirement system 
which stipulated - at that time - 
that a person be 60 or under in 
order to qualify for a pension. 

Mrs. Kemp was therefore 
ineligible. 

In 1969, the law was changed. 
Retroactive to Jan. 1, 1966, 
persons under 65 are eligible for 
retirement pensions. 

Although Mrs. Kemp was 
under 65 when she began work 
at Quincy City Hospital, the law 
was changed four years too late 
to benefit her. 

However, according to Mrs. 
Paven, Mrs. Kemp's contract 
states that a nurse who is 
terminated is entitled to 
one-quarter of her unused sick 
leave in cash, not to exceed 
$1,000. 

Mrs. Kemp had accrued 153 
days of unused sick leave, 
according to Mrs. Paven. 
One-quarter of Mrs. Kemp's 
earnings for those 153 days 
exceeded $1,000, and under the 
terms of her contract, she is 
entitled to a cash payment of 
$1,000, said Mrs. Paven. 

But the City of Quincy 
refuses to pay it. 

According to state law, 
municipal employees must retire 
at the maximum age of 70. 
However, they may be retained 
on a year to year basis until they 
reach 75. 

Mrs. Paven said that in the 
spring of 1973 City Auditor 
Alexander Smith informed 
Acting Director of Nurses Miss 
Michaeline Russell that Mrs. 
Kemp, then 75, must retire. Mrs. 
Kemp then formally did so. 

The Nursing Office then asked 
Mrs. Kemp to work during the 
summer. According to Mrs. 
Paven, Mrs. Kemp was 
"reluctant but agreeable." 

Near the end of the summer, 
Mrs. Kemp took a three or four 
week scheduled vacation due 
her. She was "terminated" after 
that vacation. 

Mrs. Paven emphasizes that 
throughout the retiring process, 
the hospital was merely 
complying with the law. 

Yet, she said, when the 



OFFICE SPACE 

FOR LEASE 

QUINCY SQUARE 

•500 S(]ii(.irc I'cct 

* Air Coiulitioncd 

* Carpeted 

* Ne w ly Rciio\ \i ted 
^ May Be Subdivided 

472-8930 469-9404 



hospital attempted to collect the 
$1,000 owed to Mrs. Kemp, the 
city auditor's office refused to 
pay. According to Mrs. Paven, 
the office contended that since 
Mrs. Kemp was not receiving a 
pension, she was "not really 
retiring." 

A grievance was filed with 
Hospital Director Harlan L. 
Paine Jr. He replied, according 
to Mrs. Paven, that he was "not 
allowed to pay it." The decision, 
he reportedly said, was dictated 
by City administration. 

The issue seems to be one of 
the proper definition of 
retirement. Massachusetts Nurses 
Association defines retirement as 
occuring on account of age, said 
Mrs. Paven. The City of Quincy, 
on the other hand, defines 
retirement as necessitating a 
pension, she said. 

Yet according to Mrs. Paven, 
Section 30 of the state law 
dealing with retirement does not 
stipulate a pension as a 
prerequisite for obtaining 
retirement benefits. 

The grievance filed with Paine 
went to arbitration - the next 
step taken in airing a complaint. 
Both the City and MNA agreed 
upon Marcia Greenbaum as 
arbitrator, said Mrs. Paven. 

Mrs. Paven noted that under 
Chapter 150A of the General 
Laws of Massachusetts, an 
arbitrator's decision is "final and 
binding on both parties". 

The arbitration hearing took 
place March 8. MNA won the 
case. Mrs. Paven said the 
decision stated that under 
Ordinance 172, the money in 
dispute is payable if someone 
retires under the General Laws 
of Massachusetts. Those laws, 
said Mrs. Paven, do not cite a 
pension as necessary to obtain 
refirement funds. 

Despite the victory, Mrs. 
Paven reports that Smith refuses 
to honor the arbitrator's 
decision. According to Mrs. 
Paven, Smith called the decision 
"illegal before and illegal now." 

Mrs. Paven added that Smith 
has not formally refused 
payment. It is Smith, however, 
who must verify the legality of 
the payment, said Mrs. Paven. 

When asked for comment by 
The Sun, Smith said, "In my 
opinion she is not entitled to it. 
1 have written a request to the 
city solicitor, asking for his 
ruling on the matter." 

MNA has now taken the next 
step in its grievance by filing in 
Suffolk Superior Court an 
"Application To Confirm 
Arbitration Award." 

A hearing is set foi- July 16. 
The City of Quincy will have an 



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NEWLY ELECTED OFFICERS of the Quincy League of Women Voters are treasurer Kathleen Foster, 
first vice-president Janice Croke, president Janet Poole, second vice-president Ina Cutler and 
corresponding secretary Grace Rutan. The new officers were elected at the League's annual dinner 
meeting at Walsh's Restaurant, North Quincy. 



opportunity then to respond. 

Mrs. Paven is confident that 
the court will issue a judicial 
order to pay Mrs. Kemp the 
$ 1 ,000. Describing Mrs. Kemp as 
"a bright, charming, active, 
vigorous lady", Mrs. Paven said: 

"There is no question in my 



mind that the* money will be 
paid. ..Justice will ultimately 
triumph." 

Mrs. Paven said she respected 
the judgement of Smith. "He has 
a right to deal with the situation 
as he sees it," she commented. 

But Mrs. Paven differentiated 



between "judgement that is 
careful and scrupulous" and 
judgement that is "obstructive." 
She said: 

"I respect Mr. Smith. But 
there is a point at which the 
situation becomes intolerable. 
This is it." 



ATTENTION 

Citizens 



Quincy 



On July 1, 1974, a joint collection will be in effect wherein 
garbage and rubbish will be collected together. 

There will be no separate garbage collection. 

It is su^ested th":t the following steps be taken to insure a 
successful transition and pickup operation: 

1. Wash out all cans before depositing in rubbish container 
- Esj^ecially cans with meat base. 

2. Wrap all garbage in either a brown grocery bag, 
newspaper or plastic bag - wrap securely so that odois will be 
contained as much as possible. 

3. If available, apply a spray of Lysol, Ammonia, IMoth 
Balls or similar product to rubbish receptacle or bag to deter 
animal activity such as dogs, etc. 

4. Either lie plastic bag or cover melal container when 
they are placed on the sidewalk. 

5. It is suggested Ihal receptacles containing garbage, if at 
all possible, be put out the morning of collection rather than 
the evening before. If you are still going to use a garbage 
receptacle, it is suggested that it be lined with a plastic bag, 
garbage be individually wrapped in either newspapers or 
grocery bags, deposited in the garbage receptacle and also be 
put out on the morning of collection. 

The above mentioned suggestions will aid us in the 
implementation of this program which, with vour 
cooperation, will be successful. 

James J. Ricciuti 
Commissioner of Public Works 



Page 4 Quincy Sun Wednesday, July 3, 1974 




M/.RRIED - Mrs. Richard J. Walter is the former Carol M. Menz, 

daughter of Mr. and Mrs. John R. Menz of 49 Babcock St., Quincy. 

Her husband is the son of Mr. and Mrs. Richard C. Walter of 33 

Delano Ave., Quincy. They were married June 8 in Blessed 

Sacrament Church, Houghs Neck. Mrs. Walter is a graduate of 

Quincy High School and the Quincy Vocational Technical School of 

Nursing. She is employed at Quincy City Hospital. Mr. Walter is also 

a graduate of Quincy High School and works for the Vulcan Tool 

Mfg. Co., Quincy. The wedding was attended by the bride's 

grandfather, Joseph V. Menz, 96. After a wedding trip to Bermuda, 

they willlive in Quincy. 

(Sharon's Studio] 

Tickets Available July 8 
For Seniors Supper Dance 



Tickets will go on sale 
Monday, July 8, at the Quincy 
Recreation Department office in 
the Kennedy Health Center for 

the Quincy Senior Citizens 
Summer-Time Supper and Dance 
to be held at the Fore River 
Clubhouse, Aug. 11. 



Mrs. Marion Andrews, 
Director, Quincy Senior Citizens 
Activities for the Quincy 
Recreation Department 
announces the supper will be at 
5:30 p.m. It will be preceded by , 
a social hour at 4:30 p.m. and 
followed by dancing from 7 p.m. 
until 10 p.m. 



Quincy Sons Of Italy 
Social Center 

120 Quarry St., Quincy 

Newest function hall now available for weddings, showers, dinner, 
dances. Two tastefully decorated halls: The Venetian Room has 
seating up to 150: Golden Lion Suite up to 300. A room for the 
bride at no extra cost. 

FOR RKSERVATION CALL 773 1295 ANY EVENING 
OR 773 2687 AFTER 2 P.M. 





Hair 



Stvlists 



\ 



RUSSELL EDWARDS 

27 COTTAGE AVE., QUINCY 

Come visit with our experienced personnel for the 
NEW Summer Look - for the Look of Individual 
Beauty - We're streaking to change your appearance 
ind W W we almost forgot to mention our - 

MONTH OF JULY SPECIALS 



Permanent Special (^gyi^j ^12 

Reg. $20 

Frosting ■ Streaking m nua | $ 4 o 

R69. $20. 



complete 



Also Mon.. Tues., & Wed., Quincy Shop only. 

GUYS and GALS 
Blow Cutting $5.»° 

Walk-in service or call for appcwntment 472-1500, 472-'>544 




At Quincy City Hospital 

June 13 

Mr. and Mrs. John Picarski, 
868 Sea St., a daughter. 

June 15 

Mr. and Mrs. Edward Petrelli, 
33 Ruggles St., a son. 

Mr. and Mrs. Anthony 
Anderlinis, 47 Taylor St., a son. 

June 22 

Mr. and Mrs. Marc Cellar, 
1025 Hancock St., a son. 

Mr. and Mrs. Louis Contrino, 
21 Trescott St., a son. 

June 24 

Mr. and Mrs. Gary R. Levins, 
201 Billings Rd, a son. 

Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Burn, 
103 Piedmont St., a son. 

June 25 

Mr. and Mrs. Michael P. Kelly, 
18 Piper St., a daughter. 

June 26 

Mr. and Mrs. Michael J. Obert, 
49 Vane St., a son. 

Mr. and Mrs. George R. 
McCosh, 30 Dexter St., a 
daughter. 

At St. Margaret's Hospital 
June 21 

Mr. and Mrs. Thomas 
McDonough, 72 Elliot Ave., a 
daughter. 

Mr. and Mrs. Danifl Byrne, 12 
Grace Rd, a daughter. 

Mr. and Mrs. Dean Allen, 87 
Whitten Ave., a daughter. 

Marcia Landa 
Receives Degree 

Marcia L. Landa of 33 Sims 
Rd, WoUaston, received a degree 
cum laude in urban and 
environmental study from 
Western Reserve College of the 
Case Institute of Technology at 
ceremonies recently in 
Cleveland, Ohio. 




ag 




MARRIED - Mr. arid Mrs. Charles P. O'Neil were married recently in 
the Star of the Sea Church, Squantum. Mrs. O'Neil is the former 
Pamela Anne Hendry, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Richard Hendry of 
26 Huckins Ave., Squantum. Mr. O'Neil is the son of Mr. and Mrs. 
Timothy O'Neil of 4 Enterprise Rd, Pocasset. 

[Pagar Studio] 



Don Orione Home 
Drive At $518,675 Mark 



The state-wide silver 
anniversary campaign to raise 
$1,000,000 for the Don Orione 
Home and Madonna Shrine in 
East Boston has passed the 
mid-way mark, announces 
Ernest J. Montilio of Quincy, 
campaign general chairman. 

Total of $518,675 has been 
pledged to the drive to date, 
Montilio reported. 

Funds raised through this 
campaign will enable an 
expansion of services for the 
elderly men and . women 
residents, modernization of the 
physical facilities, and a 
continuation -ef the erection of 
the Madonna Shrine. 



The Home and Shrine are 
maintained by the Don Orione 
Fathers and Sisters who are 
totally committed to serving the 
poor, sick, aged and mentally 
handicapped. 

More than 1,100 persons have 
been cared for at the home since 
it was established in 1949, with 
the average stay being 10 years 
for a resident. 

Contributions to the Silver 
Anniversary Fund campaign may 
be sent to: Don Orione Home & 
Madonna Shrine, 1 1 1 Orient 
Ave., East Boston, Mass. 02128. 
Contributions are tax 
deductible. 



Edith Bishop Exhibit 
At Library Gallery 



Mrs. Edith Bishop 
Weymouth is exhibiting 
paintings, both oil 



HAIRSTYLIST 
1 8 COTTAGE AVE., QUINCY 



of 
her 
and 




SPECIAL Tues., Wed. and Thurs. 



Shampoo & Set 
Tint touch up . . 



. 52" Shampoo, Cut & Set . ^4" 
^6" Perituinents from . . ^8" 



51450 



SENIOR CITIZENS Shampoo 8i Set $2.00-Perms $7.95 



Perfect Touch Perms 



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VCIOSID MONDAYS 



Stylist Prim Slightly ifigter 
PHONE 773-2 141 



watercolor, in the Main Hall 
Gallery of the Thomas Crane 
Public Library in Quincy Sq., 
through July. 

She graduated from the 
Copley School of Art in Boston, 
and taught art in the East 
Bridgewater schools. More 
recently she has studied with 

Charles Demetropohs, Ken Gore, 
Paul Strisik and Charies 
Mahoney. Her work has been 
shown in East Bridgewater, 
Weymouth, Braintree, North 
Quincy, Brockton, Peabody and 
Fresh Pond. She is a charter 
member of the Braintree Art 
Association and a member of the 
Weymouth Art Association. 



TIMEX 



® 



Factory authorized Service Center 

In and Out-of Warranty Watches Repaired 

Genuine TIMEX Energy Cells available 

/^^ 7 Jewelers 



1402 HANCOCK STREET 
773-6340 



QUINCY 



# 



Wollaston 
Florist 

Beautiful 

1.-.^ ««.-r. . Flowers 
1472-2855 I 

COMPARE 

'DELIVER PRICES 

679 HANCOCK ST. 
WOLLASTON 





Wednesday, July 3, 1974 Quincy Sun Page 5. 




ENGAGED - Mr. and Mrs. Arthur J. DesRoches of 102 Elmwood 
Ave., Wollaston, announce the engagement of their daughter, Edith, 
to John J. Hughes, son of Mr. and Mrs. Gerald F. Hughes of 
Dorchester. Miss Des Roches is a graduate of Boston State College 
and Mr. Hughes is a graduate of Boston College. An Oct. 26 wedding 
is planned. 

[The Nourses] 




GOLDEN WEDDING anniversary is observed by Mr. and Mrs. John 
Sheehy of 102 Holmes St., North Quincy, at a recent reception in 
the Montclair Men's Club, following a Mass of celebration at Sacred 
Heart Church. 

[Fitzgerald Photo] 



PERMANENT 



REMOVAL 



UNWANTED 



JM 



MARLENE 
MELAMED RX. 

Registered and Licensed 
Electrologist 
1151 Hancock St. 
Quincy 
By Appointment only 
Call 773-1330 

FORMERLY 
FRKDKRICK S.HILL 




Marriage 
Intentions 



Bruce R. Satterlund, 159 
Summer St., Weymouth, 
physical therapist; Carol L. 
Miller, 43 Standish Road, 
Quincy, clerk typist. 

Richard V, Butler, 7605 
Phoenix, Apt. 714, Houston, 
Texas, university professor; 
Ruth L. Goldstein, 20 Craig 
Ave., Quincy, public school 
teacher. 

Eugene W. Creedon, 52 
Kendall St., Quincy, teacher; 
Kathleen R. Sommers, 86 
Sachem St., Quincy, teacher. 

Paul Aldoupolis, 2 Endicott 
St., Quincy, maintenance man; 
Barbara. J. Richardson, 74 
Arborway Dr., Braintree, 
teacher. 

James D. O'Neill, 30 
Presidential Dr., Quincy, chef; 
Janice Chung, 4A Emerald Ct, 
Boston, clerk. 

Edward A. Mann, 78 Sachem 
St., Quincy, mail clerk; 
Geraldine M. Nolan, 78 Sachem 
St., Quincy, teller. 

Anthony C. DeMinico, 65 
Addison St., Brockton, garment 
worker; Linda M. Jolliemore, 
373 Sea St., Quincy, secretary. 

Ralph C. Morse Jr., 135 
Holbrook Rd, Quincy, pilot; 
Marcia G. Bevans, 101 Crabtree 
Rd, Quincy, teacher. 

Thomas F. Donelan, 31 Vine 
St., Weymouth, sheet metal 
worker; Barbara J. Whitehousc, 
30 Heath St., Quincy, LPN. 

Protestant 

Bureau 

Music Night 

The Protostant Social Service 
Bureau will sponsor a night al 
the South Shore Music Circus to 
benefit its work on the South 
Shore. 

Sandler and Yoiuig, vocal 
artists, with .Myron Cohen, 
comedian, will be featured on 
the evening of July 23. l*'or 
ticket information, call the 
Bureau office, 773-1360, Tickets 
are available to all interested 

persons. 

Mr. and Mrs. Carlton Hulteen 
of 1^)8 Randolph St., Weymouth 
are chairmen of this event. They 
will he assisted by members of 
the Board of Directors 
representing almost 90 churches. 

The Protestant Social Service 
Bureau offers family and marital 
counselling, child placement and 
foster care and Family 
enrichment Seminars. The 
organization has been serving 
families and individuals on the 
South Shore regardless of 
Church affiliation for 27 years. 



i: DEI 



#*»»»»*###»#»#»»#»»»< , 






DERRINGER 

THE FLORIST 

/•Vu-.Ti Arrani^citu'uts Flowers 
389 HANCOCK ST. 773-0959 



< . 

;: 

:: 






^5 



'm^B^m^'^ 



FASHION SHOPPE 
1538 Hancock St., Quincy 

Dresses - Pantsuits 
Sportswear - Sizes 8 To 20 



Mon. thru Sat. 10 to B 

Thurs.8( Fri. til 9 773-4748 






MARRIED " Mr. and Mrs. James E. Sheerin Jr. were married 
recently in St. John's Church, Quincy. Mrs. Sheerin is the former 
Joan Macchi, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Rudolph Macchi of 277 
Whitwell St., Quincy. Mr. Sheerin is the son of Mr. and Mrs. James 
Sheerin of 28 Burns Ave., Quincy. She is a graduate of Quincy High 
School. He is also a graduate of Quincy High School, and is currently 
employed as a mechanic. After a wedding trip to Bermuda, they will 
live in Wcymoutn. 

[Pagar Studio] 

Summer, Fall Activities 
For Seniors Listed 

annual tt)liage trip to Wolfeboro, 
N.ll.. is scheduled for Oct. 
8-()-10. 

On Nov. 9 the third annual 
Bowling Nite and Supper will be 
held. A trip to the Chateau de 
Villc Dinner Theatre in 
Raiuioiph is planned for Dec. 1. 
Other events scheduled are: 
Jan. 17, Spaghetti Supper and 
Dance; Feb. 14, Hearts and 
Flowers- Valentine Dinner Dance 
and a St. Patrick's Dinner Dance 
March 14. 

Further details concerning the 
events may be obtained by 
calling the Recreation 
Department Office. 



Mrs. Marion Andrews, 
Director of Senior Citizens 
Activities for the Quincy 
Recreation Depart m e n t , 
announces several programs for 
Quincy Senior Citizens for the 
summer and fall seasons. 

On Aug. 1 1 a Summer Time 
Supper will be held at the Fore 
River Clubhouse. The third 
Annual Nite Out at Foxboro 
Raceway will be Aug. 28. 

The eighth in a series of 
Nursing Home Patients' Nite Out 
will be held Sept. 12 al the 
Bryan VFW Post Home. The 
aniUKil Harvest Dinner and Bali 
will be Oct. 2.-> and the second 



We are interested in PURCHASING 
& APPRAISING precious jewels. 

FREE CONSULTATION FOR PRIVATE 
OWNERS, BANKERS & ATTORNEYS 

Robert S. Freeman Certified (iemolo^ist 

Call 773-2170 HARTS Jewelers 

1422 HaiKotk .St, Ouincy, Mass, 




»**^*4******0**4******** * ^*^^**^****^^**^********^******^***^ r 




sTJiNi 



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BeaoW 



Sa\on 




SENIOR CITIZENS 

DISCOUNT 
60 YEARS AND UP 
6 DAYS A WEEK 

Wash & Set $2.00 
Haircut 1.50 

Permanent Wave 

complete with 

wash, set & cut $8.95 up 



Men's Hair 
Styling by 
Sabina 

By appointment 
Something New - A 
Men 's Hair Styling 
Salon I For Boys touj 
J 5 BEALE ST. AND 661 HANCOCK ST. WALK-IN SERVICE 472-9687 j 



Customers 
under 60 yrs. 
Discount 

Men., Tues. - Wed. 
Wash & Set . 
$3.00 & up 



Pag« 6 Quincy Sun Wednesday, July 3, 1974 



RIGHTS 

Giving anniversary party? 



By RIV TOBIN 
Copley News Service 

Dear Mrs. Tobin: 

My husband and I are plan- 
ning the party we will give in 
August to celebrate our 
golden wedding anniversary. 
We will be sending out invita- 
tions engraved in golu. VVc do 
not want (or need) any gifts 
from friends or family. How 
can we get this message 
across on the invitation? 

Mr. and Mrs. Bellows 

Dear Mr. and Mrs. Bellows: 
"Good wishes only," should 
go in the lower left hand 
corner of the invitation. If 
you're asking for an RSVP the 
"good wishes only" should go 
in the lower right hand 
corner.' 

Dear Mrs. Tobin: 

My name is Patricia but 
everyone calls me Pat. My 
husband is Patrick and every- 
one calls him Pat. It sure is 
confusing and it looks funny to 
write "Pat and Pat Riley" on 
invitations. We've been 
married a year and still 
haven't worked out a solution 
to the problem. Any sugges- 
tions? 

Patricia R. 

Dear Patricia: 

How about calling yourself 

"Patty"^ It is the diminuUve 
and feminine form of 
Patricia. 




N.O.W. 
Get it 

from 
Colonial 
Federal. 

We've got it— 

the N.O.W. 
Account. 

It's better than a checking 
account because it pays 
interest from day of deposit to 
day of withdrawal -at 5% 
annually, compounded 
monthly. 

You can pay your bills with a 
N.O.W. Account by writing 
negotiable orders of 
withdrawal, making them 
payable to anyone -just like 
checks. 

Each draft you write costs only 
15 cents, and when they're 
cashed at Colonial Federal, 
they're free. 

N.O.W. For 
Experience. 

If you're 62 or older. Colonial 
Federal gives you NOW. For 
Experience- a free NOW. 
Account. 

Colonial 
.VFederal 
/? Sawlmgs 

And Loan Association 
of Quincy 

15 Beach Street 

Wollaston 
Tel. 471-0750 

Note: $10 must remain in 
.account to be paid interest. 



Dear Mrs. Tobin: 

I want to comment on your 
answer to "No Palmist" who 
asked about tipping a rest- 
room attendant. You are right 
when you say a woman should 
tip for a special service. But 
25 cents just because the at- 
tendant is there? Never! 

^^j "" — 



Dear Mrs. ToWn: 

I can top "No Pahnist's" 
story. In one restroom I know 
about, the attendant has re- 
moved all the paper towels 
from the holder. She hands 
one to each patron with one 
hand and reaches for a tip 
with the other. Bah! Humbug! 



Dekr Mrs. Tobin: 

1 always feel so elegant 
when I patronize a restaurant 
or shop that hires an attend- 
ant for their restroom. I wish 
they all did. 

Margery McC. 



Dear Mrs. Tobin: 

I once asked the restroom 
attendant in a nightclub to tell 
the maitre d' to summon my 
husband as I was quite ill She 
told me she was not allowed to 
leave the premises. Needless 
to say I'll never tip again or 
have we ever returned to that 
club. 

Barbaras. 



m 



H 



5^^'''''mm 



Health & Beauty Briefs 

Laut^li lines, under the eye 
pouches and wrinkled skin 
under the chin are the most 
frequent symptoms that send 
older women to the plastic 
surgeon, according to a new 
hook called "Agele.ss Aging." 
Men go lor such operations 
most often tor sagging eye- 
lids, a frown between the 
eyebrows, or a "turkey gobler 

neck." 

***** 

As hair grays, it becomes 
lliicker and coarser. It's scalp 
trouble that brings on early 
grey liair, author Ruth Winter 
writes. Injury or disease ol' 
the nervous system some- 
times cau.se graying patterns, 
she adds. 

-T" T- 'I' 'T' "T^ 

C'o-cd freshmen in K.msas 
who were t'onsidered physi- 
cally fit had fewer menstrual 
di.scom forts, digestive disor- 
ders, backaches, fatigue, colds 
and allergies, than other col- 
lege girls. 



To-dct(j'4 V\fam.ea 



ONCE OVER LIGHTLY 

How can you refuse puppy? 



By ANN RUDY 
Copley News Service 

Next to a new baby, there is 
probably no more exciting ad- 
dition to a family than a new 
puppy. But there are some 
differences. 

I mean, you don't bring a 
baby home from an afternoon 
outing because some kid had a 
box of them marked "free" 
outside a supermarket. 

Have you ever tried to walk 
a normal boy past a box like 
that? It's not hard, it's impos- 
sible. 

"Mom, look!" my son said, 
as he held a small black pup 
close in his arms, "She needs 
a home. ..." 

I looked at them and the pup 
raised innocent, suffering eye 
toward mine. So did the boy, 
but he was as phony as a 
three-dollar bill. I know that 
kid. 

Television has robbed him 
of his innocence, and all he 
knows of suffering is a res- 
taurant that doesn't serve 
hamburgers. 

"Mom, free," he said. 

PERSONAL 

Keep 

By PAT and 

\URILYN DAVIS 

Copley News Service 

Dear Pat and Marilyn: 

1 met Ron two months ago 
and am madly in love with 
him. He has been seeing me at 
least a couple of times a week 
but this terrible, awful feeling 
that he is also dating others is 
always with me. I have 
stopped seeing everyone else 
so that my evenings are al- 
ways free for Ron. He never 
asks me on the same nights 
and I am afraid that if I make 
another date that will be the 
very night Ron will call. He 
also tends to call me at the 
last minute and seldom 
makes plans more than a day 
ahead. 

What I want to know is how 
can I catch Ron'!' I am really 



Special News for 
South Quincy 
Telephone 
Customers ! 

Quincy Adams Pharmacy, 61 Franklin Street, 
South Quincy, is no longer accepting payments of 
telephone bills. 

Payments may continue to be made by mail 
using the return envelope provided; in person at 
the Telephone Business Office, 1229 Hancock 
Street, Quincy; or at any of the other payment 
agencies listed on page 2 of your local phone book. 



New England 
Telephone 





'she needs 

a home . * 

"Free like an evening with 
Zsa Zsa Gabor," I answered. 
"There are attending costs. 
Shots. Food. And when we 
leave tow» we'll have to board 
that dog in a kennel that costs 
more per day than our motel. 



Free, my foot." 

But I had made the mistake 
of letting the boy hand her to 
me. So we brought her home 
— after phoning my husband 
at work to make sure it was 
UK. He took the easy way out 
and said yes. 

Now we show her off to visi- 
tors, holding her up like a 
first-born heir, and siay ab- 
surd things about the unusual 
color of her eyes. We've done 
everything but give out 
cigars. 

Yet, a dog is a dog is a dog. I 
mean, most new babies have 
the decency not to chew up 
your cactus plants. Or eat 
your bedroom slippers. 

And new babies don't paw 
your legs with sharp claws, 
ruining your last pair of sup- 
port hose. 

But then, people don't rub a 
baby's nose in its mistakes 
and shove it out the door into 
the night either. Or smack it 
with a newspaper to get a 
point across. So it all evens 
out. 

Anyway, we call her Roxy, 
and she has the most unusual 
eyes. 



courtship in check 



in love. 

Josie 

Dear Josie: 

You are picking out your 
silver pattern too soon. Slow 
down or you will lose all. Men 
still like to think they are the 
pursuers and competition is 
the spice of courtship. Don't 
be so available. 

Dear Pat and Marilyn: 

My daughter is a terrible 
housekeeper. The house is ab- 
solutely filthy. She does keep 
herself and the children clean. 
Her husband must be blind 
because he seems not to no- 
tice. Anyway, this is not my 
business. I say nothing when I 
visit because her family 
seems happy enough. The 
problem is with the neighbors. 



Several of them know me and 
my friends and their constant 
topic of conversation is how 
dirty my daughter is. This al- 
ways comes up during our 
coffee klatches. I can't argue 
the point, but it angers me 
just the same. How can I si- 
lence these busybodies? 

Grandma 
Dear Grandma: 

These gals are not very 
good friends or they would 
keep quiet. If you must get to- 
gether and the subject comes 
up, stop it fast. Tell the talk- 
ers that your daughter may 
not be the best housekeeper in 
the world, but that she does 
have a happy family, nice 
children, and a fine husband. 
That ought to give them food 
for thought to go with the cof- 
fee. 



Is fish really 'brain' food? 



/Minost ail part.s uf t.he body 
cuntain some phosphate, with 
Ihe brain (ontaining more 
than mast. 

P"i.sh (loe.s contribute phos- 



phiUe to the diet, especially if 
yuu eat the bones in sardines 
and canned .salmon, but the 
brain obtain.s the phosphate it 
needs, regardless of how 
much fish you eat — CNS 



Eyeglass Prescriptions Filled - Lenses Duplicated 
Over 1000 Frames on Display - Photogray & Tints 

HEARING AIDS - Complete Service 
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ALL WORK GUARANTEED ^(P 

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1361A HANCOCK ST., QUINCY SQUARE 

Tel: 773-3505 773-4174 





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HEATING 

Complete Bathroom Remodeling 
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339 SOUrHERN AR ri RY, Qt'INCY 
MASTER Lie. NO. 7596 




Your Horoscope Guide 



For The Week of July 7 to 13 
By GINA, Copley News Service 

For more complete' forecast, read indications for you 
Ascendant si^n plus Fiirth si^n To find your Ascendant sign 
count ahead from Birth sign the number ol signs indicated 



Tinu- of Itirlh: 

4 to 6 a m 

6 to 8 am 

8 to 10 am. 

10 to 12 Noon 

Noon to 2 n.m. 

2 to 4 p.m. 

4 to 6 p. m 

6 to 8 p m. 

8 to 10 p.m 

10 to Midnight 

Midnight to 2 a.m. 

2 to 4 a.m. 



I'roitaltic A^«■elHlanl i^: 

Same as birth sign 

First sign following 

Second sign following 

Third sign following 

Fourth sign following 

Fifth sign following 

Sixth sign following 

Seventh sign following 

Eighth sign following 

Ninth sign following 

Tenth sign following 

Eleventh sign following 



ARIES: (March 21 to April 
19 — Also Aries Ascendant) — 
There are pressures in real 
estate matters, properties 
and home environment. Get 
good advice from an objective 
source rather than friends or 
relatives. Be realistic — start 
nothing new, but work on ex- 
isting projects. 

TAURUS: (April 20 to May 
20 — Also Taurus Ascendant) 

— Put the final touches on 
projects for presentation next 
week. Possibihty of an honor 
coming to you. Be especially 
cooperative with others. Dis- 
agreements with mate should 
not be arguments, but discus- 
sions. 

GEMINI: (May 21 to June 
20 — Also Gemini Ascendant) 

— Work in the background on 
things already in progress. 
Listen to advice from superi- 
ors. Good time for a vacation 
if possible. Shop for bargains 
in wearing apparel. Entertain 
friends at home over the 
weekend. 

CANCER: (June 21 to July 
22 — Also Cancer Ascendant) 

— Ideas for new projects 
come to you now. Find the 
need that others have and 



wqrk to fill it. Old problems 
can be solved now. Curb de- 
sires to over-extend your 
budget or credit. Matters at a 
distance are important. 

LEO: (July 23 to August 22 
— Also Leo Ascendant) — 
Curb feelings of laziness. Do 
each day's tasks on time and 
headway ii made. Read all 
communications very care- 
fully. If possible, delay mak- 
ing commitments until next 
week — sleep on decisions for 
now. 

VIRGO: (August 23 to Sept. 
22 — Also Virgo Ascendant) — 

Curb impulse to be slipshod in 
work habits. Energy may be 
low, so work at a slower but 
careful pace. Financial in- 
vestments are favored now — 
use your own good judgment. 
Be realistic about romance. 

UBRA: (Sept. 23 to Oct. 22 

— Also Libra Ascendant) — 

You may be forced into a de- 
cision to discard outworn 
methods and relationships. 
Clean out attics and drawers 

— clear out all areas of your 
life for new beginnings. This 
appears to be a turning point 
of your life. 

SCORPIO: (Oct. 23 to Nov. 



21 — Also Scorpio Ascendant) 

— You can take a breather 
^ this week and clear up loose 
ends you have been too busy 
to handle. Actively pursue 
your artistic talents and hob- 
bies. Good tune to undertake 
a diet to change your weight. 

SAGITTARIUS: (Nov. 22 to 
Dec. 21 — Also Sagittarius As- 
cendant) — Social affairs 
.sparkle for you now, and all 
pleasurable pursuits. Share 
your joy with others and your 
enUiusiasm for life. (Jomplete 
important work ahead of 
schedule. You could be work- 
ing toward promotion. 

CAPRICORN: (Dec. 22 to 
Jan. 19 — Also Capricorn As- 
cendant) — Seriously plan for 
the future and lay the ground- 
work. Good time to study or 
take additional training. 
Dealings with superiors may 
be "touchy." If possible wait 
until next week to have dis- 
cussions. 

AQUARIUS: (Jan. 20 to 
Feb. 18 — Also Aquarius As- 
cendant) — Curb impulse to 
invest in promotional 
schemes. Don't spread your- 
self thin financially. Be real- 
istic and level-headed in 
romance. 

PISCES: (Feb. 19 to March 
20 — Also Pisces Ascendant) 
— A good luck atmosphere is 
around you regarding career 
and profession. Creative 
imagination geared to service 
ideas will pay off for you now. 
C^irb tendency toward ex- 
travagance — be practical 
and realistic. 

Order your personalized 
horoscope and analysis now. 
Discover your talents, poten- 
tials and understand your re- 
lationships better from this 
individual interpretation. For 
information, write: Your 
Horoscope Guide, Copley 
News Service, in care of this 
newspaper. 



Rubella vaccination 
fights birth defects 

Children from 1 year of age 
to 12 are prune targets for ru- 
bella vaccination because 
they are the principal trans- 
mitters of the virus. 

Rubella (German measles) 
is a mild childhood disease, 
but if a woman becomes in- 
fected early in pregnancy 
there is risk of severe birth 
defects and sometimes death 
to her unborn child. — CNS 




" OtN.coU «.Di i„t 

FACTORY SERVICE 



FOR 



RCA-MOTROLA-SYLVANIA-ZENITH 
ADMIRAL-MASTERWORKS 

Call 479-1350 




PHOTO COURTESY OF THOMAS CRANE PUBLIC LIBRARY 



...The corner of Broadway and 
Washington St, Quinty Point, 
looked like this. The sign in 
the window of the First 
National Store is advertising 
fresh milk 13 cents a quart. 

REMEMBER WHEN 

...You were not just a Policy 
Number and retained your 
own identity, when personal 
service was always given ... It 
still is at ... 



BURGIN 

PLATNER 

INS. 

1357 Hancock Street, 
Quincy 472-3000 



Wednesday,|July 3, 1^74 Qiiincy .Su;i ?agp 7. 

YOUR HANDWRITING TELLS 

'Y' loop shows 
loss of faith 



By DOROIHY 

ST. JOHN JACKSON 

Certified Master 

Graphoaiialyst 

Copley News Service 

Dear Dorothy: 

I feel like the fifth wheel on 
the wagon. What do you see 
for me'? 

W.Z. 
Dear W.Z.: 

You can either be the spare 
in case the other four fail or 
you can be the awkward ex- 
tra. When you pile up a mound 
of minuses against your 
pluses, you automatically 
spring a personality leak. 

Your friendly personality, 
seen in your forward slant, 
your love of people, seen in 
the evaluation of the lower 
loops, and your generous na- 
ture, seen in the word endings 
along the line, could take you 
anywhere you wanted to go, if 
you'd let it. Yet, you have 
overloaded your personality 
with so many years that you 
have punctured your charm. 
In a room full of people, 
your vision is blurred as you 
wonder — wonder how they'll 
accept you, seen in the high 



part on the m and the high 
point on the y. With an inner 
turmoil, your freedom of ex- 
pression is inhibited. 

Then, your overworked 
imagination, seen in the large 
loop on y, builds a situation 
which causes you to lose faith 
in yourself and in your efforts, 
seen in the very low t cross- 
ings. So, mstead of doing as 
much as possible to extend 
yourself, you do as little as 
possible. Coasequently, you 
feel unproductive, unimpor- 
tant, and even unwanted. 

Your natural tendency is to 
be with people, but someone 
or something (somehow or 
somewhere) has given you 
cause to be ill-at-ease, and for 
really no reason at all. 

"Trunk" your fifth wheel 
image, and join the four which 
will steer you onto the road of 
desire, hope, and faith in 
yourself. 

D.J. 

Selected letters will be an- 
swered in this column. To ob- 
tain the pamphlet "Your T's 
Tell," write to Dorothy St. 
John Jackson, Copley News 
Service, in care of this news- 
paper. 



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U. S. has highest incidence of rape 



The United States has the 
highes* rape rate, 20 per cent 
higher than that of Britain. 

One out of six women is 



raped in the United States, 
with a rape occurring every 
two minutes; 40 per cent of 
rapists are married men. — 



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1011 HANCOCK ST., QUrNCY 
Tel: 472-9677 

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Immediate Delivery 

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CHILDREN AND FIRES 



Thou.sands of persons die each 
year in home fires, and one-third 
of these arc children. Yet many ol 
these young lives could have been 
saved if only precautions and 
general rules of fire safety had 
been followed. A child's natural 
curiosity can cause trouble when 
matches or lighters are left within 
their reach. They always should 
be put away after use. Other 
precautions are: 

Never leave a young child home 
alone. 

Show your baby-sitler the 
escape routes from the house 
[two from each room should be 
designated! and give instructions 
to get the children out of the 
house the first instant smoke or 
escaping gas is found, followed by 
a call to the fire department from 
an alarm box or a neighbor's 
house. 



Teach children who are old 
enough how to get out of the. 
house by following prearranged 
escape routes. Designate a family 
member to help a younger child 
to escape. 

* « * 

This information has been 
brought to you as a public service 
by NABORHOOD PHARMACY, 
406 Hancock St., No. Quincy. 

OUR SERVICES INCLUDE: 

24 hour emergency service, 
Charge accounts. 
Family prescription records, 
Year end ta.\ records, 
Delivery service, 
Insurance receipts, 
Hospital supplies for sale or rent. 
Open 7 days a week, 8 - 10. 
Phone: 773-6426. 




Page 8 Quincy Sun Wednesday, July 3, 1974 



-•<> 



I 



4 




Native Salad Greens For Holiday 



No matter what you have for 
your holiday dinner this Fourth 
of July - hot dogs, steak, or 
salmon and peas - there are 
plenty of fresh, native salad 
greens available for tossed salad 
or garnish, reports the 
Massachusetts Department of 
Agriculture (MDA). 

From nearby farms come 
chicory, escarole and romaine 
lettuce in abundance, and priced 
low enough to rate Best Buy 
status. 

Native radishes and scallions 
are in good supply, too, so the 
makings of a good tossed salad 
are as near as the farm stand or 
produce counter. The MDA also 
reports a good supply of fine, 
tender green cabbage from local 



growers. 

Just about all native crops are 
being harvested daily in the Bay 
State, and your choice of fresh 
vegetables this week is wide 
indeed. 

This is the season, too, for 
fresh peas, with suppUes 
relatively plentiful, and prices 
probably below those of a year 
ago. So you'll have the peas to 
go with the salmon if you're 
planning a traditional holiday 
dinner.. .if you can find the 
salmon. 

The local strawberry season 
will last at least another two 
weeks, according to the MDA, 
and the word is that you can still 



visit a strawberry plantation and 
pick your own from the fields. 
And since growing crop's take no 
notice of holidays, making a visit 
to a pick-your-own strawberry 
grower on the Fourth might be a 
good holiday activity for the 
family. In the Boston area, you 
can call the MDA Division of 
Markets - 727-3018 - for a 
grower list. It might be wise, 
however, to call ahead to the 
one you select, to make sure 
there's still a crop to be picked. 
Native rhubarb continues in 
good supply at roadside farm 
stands and supermarkets, 
providing a good opportunity to 
make strawberry-rhubarb pie, or 
a good rhubarb sauce sweetened 
with strawberries. 



flJV Post Wins State Community Service Award 



Hou^s Neck Legion Post for 
a second time is state winner of 
the Claudius G. Pendill Trophy 
and Banner for community 
service. 

The award is given annually 
for Post activity for the period 
between May 1 and April 30 of 
the following year. Post 
Historian Mary TinJcoe compiles 
the reports of. >ehildren and 



youth programs, Americanism 
and patriotic activities, 
community service and welfare 
programs. 

The Post won the trophy in 
1970-71 under Commander 
Ernest Fitzgibbon. It placed 
second last year, and received 
first place this year "under 
Commander Willard J. Timcoe. 



The trophy and a banner will 
be presented to Commander 
Timcoe at the American Legion 
State Convention in Pittsfield 
the week of June 23. The 
Houghs Neck Post will head the 
Convention Parade there, on 
June 29 at 3 p.m. 

Judging was held in Auburn 
with Claudius Pendill as one of 
the final judges. ' ; 



2 Sterling Teachers 'Outstanding Educators^ 



Miss Marcia Rosenblum and 
Miss Angela Solmonte, English 
teachers at Sterling Junior High 
School, have been named 
Outstanding Secondary 
Educators of America for 1974. 

Nominated by their Principal, 
Paul A. Breslin, earlier this year, 
the two women were chosen for 
the honor on the basis of their 
professional and civic 
achievements. 

Outstanding Educators of 



America is an annual awards 
program honoring distinguished 
men and women for their 
exceptional services, 
achievements and leadership in 
the field of secondary education. 
In announcing the awards for 
the year. Dr. V. Gilbert Beers, 
director of Outstanding 
Educators of America program, 
said, "The men and women 
chosen for this high honor have 
explored new paths, developed 



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new insights and effectively 
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They are exceptional teachers." 
Each year the biographies of 
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America. 

Arthur Rutledge 

Completes 

Navy Course 

Navy Fireman Apprentice 
Arthur N. Rutledge, son of Mr. 
and Mrs. Arthur E. Rutledge of 
158 Phipps St., Quincy, has 
completed the Electrician's Mate 
School at Great Lakes, 111. 

Electrician's mates install, 
maintain and repair shipboard 
generators, electric motors and 
light and power distribution 
systems. 



Ward 2 Civic Assn, 

Sponsoring Band 

Concert, 4th Activities 



Ward 2 Civic Association is 
sponsoring a two-part 4th of 
July ceiebnUion at Fore River 
Field. 

Tonight [Wednesday] at 6 
p.m. the 215th Army Band will 
present a two-hour, old 
fashioned concert. 

Festivities on Thursday will 
start at 10 a.m. with a sack race, 
a three-legged contest, a 
wheelbarrow race and dashes - 
all with prizes to the winners. 

At 1 p.m. there will be doll 
carriage, bike and horribles 
parades. 



At 1:30 the final field events 
of the day begin. There will be 
two egg throwing contests, one 
for those 16 to 20, the other for 
those 21 and over. 

Ice cream and soda will be 
given away and clowns, fire 
engines and floats will deck the 
field. 

Theodore Harrington, 
president of Ward 2 Civic 
Association, and a five-member 
committee planned the two-day ■ 
celebration. They were Phyllis 
Bagen, Ted DeCristofaro, Owen 
Eaton, James Lyons and Thomas 
Williams. 



Adams Shore Plans Full 
Day Of Holiday Activities 



The Adams Shore Community 
Association will sponsor a full 
day of activities for the Fourth 
of July. 

Beginning at 9:30 a.m. "a flag 
raising ceremony will be 
conducted at O'Hara Circle by 
the George F. Bryan VFW Post. 
A flag donated by Congressman 
James A. Burke, which was 
flown over the U.S. Capitol, will 
be flown for the first time. 

Doll carriage and costume 
parade will form at the Hunting 
SchooL playground at 11 a.m. 
and will march down Pelican and 
Albatross Rd to O'Hara Circle to 
the Heron Rd beach. Prizes will 
be awarded in the doll carriage 
parade, and costume parade ages 
1-7 and ages 7 and up. 



From noon to 1 p.m. the 
community association will sell 
hot dogs and drinks at the 
beach. 

Games will be held at the 
beach playground from 1 p.m. 
and will be open to all age 
groups. Egg throwing contests 
and races are among the 
activities planned. 

Serving on the July Fourth 
Committee is Debbie Nigro, 
Carol Bonderick, Leo Donovan, 
Bob Nordstrom, Barbara BeUew, 
Nancy O'Brien, Bill Perch, John 
Johnston, Harvey and Rhoda 
Solomon, Peg Thornton, Gerry 
Shea, Clara Cardillo, Kathy 
Donovan and Rev. Kenneth 
Miner. 

General chairman 
Harold. 



is Paul 



Houghs Neck Council 
Plans '4th' Field Day 



The Houghs Neck Community 
Council will hold its annual 
Fourth of July field day 
tomorrow [Thursday] at 
Lebrecque Field from 1 1 a.m. to 
6 p.m. 

Highlight of the day will be 
the crowning of Miss Houghs 
Neck. 



There will be a grand drawing 
for a portable television set, a 
10-speed bike and a two-man 
rubber boat. 

A doll carriage parade, a 
horribles parade and sporting 
events will be held throughout 
the day. 

Pony rides and refreshments 
will be available. 



Band Concert Wednesday 
At Heron Rd. Beach 



The Adams Shore Community 
Association will sponsor an old 
fashioned band 



concert 



Heron 

from 

to 11 



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Wednesday night at the 
Rd Beach Playground 
approximately 8:30 p.m. 
p.m. 

The concert, featuring a 
35-piece band, is part of the 
Adams Shore July 4th 
celebration. It is open to the 
public. Those attending will have 
to supply their own chairs. 
Refreshments will be available. 

Heron Rd Beach Playground 
is off Albatross Rd, which is off 
Sea St. 

Lottery Security 
Chief Rotary 
Club Speaker 

John M. Callahan of Milton, a 
former FBI agent who is chief of 
security for the Massachusetts 
State Lottery Commission, will 
be the featured speaker Tuesday, 
July 9, at the Quincy Rotary 
Club meeting at 12:15 p.m. in 
the Quincy Point Congregational 
Church. 

Louis S. Cassani is the 
program chairman. 




Parade, Road Race, Olympics, Beauty Contest 
Among Merrymount's '4th' Attractions 



Wednesday, July 3, 1974 Quincy Sun Page 9 



Rex Trailer, Big Bird, Mickey 
and Minnie Mouse, Snoopy and 
Donald Duck will march in the 
Merrymount Association's 
Fourth of July Parade 
announces Chairman Fran 
Farerl 

This year marks the 50th 
anniversary of the association. 

Festivities will start 
Wednesday evening, July 3, with 
a road race supervised by Robert 
Seamans. This will be followed 
by the selection of Miss 
Merrymount and Little Miss and 
Master Merrymount. The Miss 
Merrymount contest will be 
directed by James and Dorothy 
Mulcahy. The winner will ride in 
the parade. 

Junior Olympics for the 
children and teenagers will be 
held the morning of the Fourth 
at Perkins Field. Chairman 
William Lewis said track, field, 
and a basketball free throw 
event have been added to the 
traditional dashes and 
wheelbarrow races. The shot 
put, discus throw, and javelin 
throw will be included. 

Assisting Lewis will be John 



MoUoy, Joe McConville, and 
Joseph Cunniff. Immediately 
following these events, James 
Mulcahy and Si Tutunjian are in 
charge of the blueberry pie 
eating contests. 

Bugle call for the parade will 
be at 12:30 at the Merrymount 
School. Marchers will proceed 
down Narragansett, Chickatabot, 
and Norton Rds., to Sea St., 
Samaset Ave., Longwood, 
Moreland, Waban, Maypole, 
Squanto, and Victoria Rds. with 
the finish at Merrymount Beach. 

A Stanley Steamer will 
transport the officers of the 
association in style. They are 
Paul Hussey, president; James 
lorio, vice president; Robert 
Mitchell, treasurer; Regina 
Whalen, recording secretary; and 
Diane Rochelle, corresponding 
secretary. The street 
competitions will follow 
interspersed with bands and the 
bicycle and doll carriage 
competitions. Among the bands 
marching will be the Quincy 
Renegades, Sir Thomas More of 
Braintree, St. Peter's and St. 



Morrisette To Hold 
Annual 4th Field Day 



Morrisette Legion Post will 
hold its annual Fourth of July 
Celebration for children and 
adults of West and South Quincy 
next Thursday, announces 
Comdr. Lawrence Camali. 

The event, held at O'Rourke 
Field, West Quincy, wUl start at 
10 a.m. and end at S p.m. There 
will be many events for children 
of all ages, and prizes for all of 
these events, will be awarded to 
the winners. 

Special event^ will consist of a 
doll carriage parade, bicycle 



parade and horribles parade. Past 
Commander Fred Peruzzi, 
Albert Barilaro and Fred 
Donohue are co-chairmen. 

There \yill be free pony rides 
for the children and hot dogs, 
tonic, candy and ice cream for 
everyone. 

At 7:30 p.m. on the post 
grounds, an old fashioned band 
concert will be presented by the 
Morrisette Post Band. The public 
is invited to attend. 
Refreshments will be served. 



Edward Arnold 
CompUte's Active Duty 



Navy Aviation Support 
Equipment Technician Third 
Class Edward M. Arnold, son of 
Mr. and Mrs. Joseph R. Arnold 
of 40 Upton St., West Quincy 
and husband of the former Miss 
Barbara A. Sullivan of 23 Marion 
St., Wollaston, completed two 
weeks of annual active duty for 



training with Intermediate 
Maintenance Support Unit 
23Z-1 at the Naval Air Station, 
North Island, Calif. 

Arnold drills one weekend a 
month with the unit at the Naval 
Air Reserve Station. South 
Weymouth. 



f^ardond & Klcnardi. 



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INC. 



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Opposite Quincy 
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471-1357 



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Opi'ii Ttuiis 'K Fn Fvi". to 9 P M 



Ann's of Dorchester and the 
Milton Post Band. 

A special 50th anniversary 
float will feature the Merri-Shore 
Senior citizens and the teenagers 
of Merrymount. 

Among those expected to 
march are Mayor Walter 
Hannon, Senator Arthur Tobin, 
Rep. Thomas Brownell, and 
Councillor Leo Kelly. 

Finishing up the parade will 
be the Roadsters and Street 



Rods' antique cars. The cars will 
range from a 1928 touring car to 
a 1941 Ford Continental. 

On July 5 and July 6, the 
semi-finals and finals of the 
tennis tournament will be held, 
chaired by Ann Cosgrove. 
Following the final contest, 
there will be a Block Party at the 
Narragansett Road tennis courts, 
chaired by Paul and Marilyn 
Flynn. Awards for all events will 
be presented then. 




KEEP YOUR 
COOL... 

Giv* your angin* 

and trontmitsion 

a brack.... 

CLEAN YOU R COOI IMG SYSTEMI 

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Cooling A Air CondHioning 
Spotialists 

328-7464 

179 W»st Squanfum Si., No. Quincy 



At Your Service 
The Master Charge Way 




These fine Quincy stores offer a 
wide variety of products and con- 
veniences. 




AUTOMOTIVE 



GIFT SHOP 



PHARMACY 



Fortune Citgo 
470 Adams Street 
Quincy. 479-9424 

Hancock St. Sunoco Station 
|325 Hancock Street 
No. Quincy, 328-9759 
All Major Cards Accepted 

Duggan Bros. • Chevrolet 
North Quincy Garage 
131 Hancock St. 
; North Quincy, 328-9400 

i Walter J. Hannon Tire 

• 495 Hancock St. 

; I No. Quincy. 472-2027 

i 

< 

: 

;; 



The Unique Shop 
131 Washington St., 
Quincy, 479-2062 
Open Wed. thru Sat. 
10 A.M.-5 P.M. 



HARDWARE 



Atlas Paint & Supply 
403 Hancock St. 
No. Quincy 479-1621 

Granite City Hardware Co., Inc.J?? Hancock Street 



Atlantic Pharmacy 

245 Atlantic St. 

No. Quincy 328-4942 

Gold Medal Drug Co. 
1143 Hancock Street 
Quincy. 472-5542 
0pp. Masonic Temple 

Keene'sBeale Street 
Pharmacy Inc. 
649 Hancock Street 
Wollaston 773-7117 
Naborhood Pharmacy Inc. 



1617 Hancock Street 
Quincy. 479-5454 



i ; Bernie's Modern Formal Shop L HOME F URNISHINGS 
''1586 Hancock Street 



CLOTHING 



Quincy, 773-6426 
Samoset Pharmacy Inc. 
215Samoset Ave., 
No. Quincy 77S-1440 



Quincy, 773-7213 

!; Roberta's Fashions 
<; 1538 Hancock St., 
; I Quincy, 773-4748 

;' 

;i DECORATING 

'I 

:: 
'. 



SUPPLIES 



Quincy Adams Garden Center 
12 Penn St. 
Quincy. 472-3602 



Quincy Furniture Co. 
1604 Hancock St., 
Quincy, 479-1715 

Tags Sleep & 
Lounge Shop 
1568 Hancock St., 
Quincv. 471-6180 



POLICE, FIRE & 
MARINE MONITOR 



Kensco Communication Inc, 
46 Pearl Street 
Quincy, 471-6427 



RESTAURANTS 



JEWELRY 



Duttons Restaurant Inc. 
125 Sea Street 
Quincy, 471-1623 , 



FLORISTS 



Derringer The Florist 
389 Hancock Street 
No. Quincy, 773-0959 

j The Flower Basket 

: 15 Foster St. 

; Quincy, 479-6082 

i Quint's Flower Shop 
; 761 Southern Artery 
I Quincv. 773-7620 
1 Roy's Flowers, Inc. 
I 94 Washington St., 
i Quincy. 472-1900 

i Major Credit Cards 

; Accepted by Phone 

I 

; Wollaston Florist 
1: 679 Hancock Street 
i; Wollaston -472-2855 



George Stone's Jewelry 
1470 Hancock St. 
Quincy, 773-8769 

Roger's Jewelry 
1402 Hancock Street 
Quincy, 773-6340 

Richard J. Gorman 
23A Beale St. 
Wollaston, 773-5031 

Quincy Jewelry 
1564 Hancock Street 
Quincy. 773-7893 



SKIN DIVING 
EQUIPMENT 



South Shore Skin Divers, Inc. 
511 Washington Street 
Quincy, 773-5452,471-9800 



TRAVEL 



World Wide Travel 
Agency Corp. 
664 Hancock St., 
Wollaston 472-2900 



TV & APPLIANCES 



LIGHTING FIXTURES 
AND LAMPS 



FOOTWEAR 



Child Teen Shoe Shop & 

r. Scholl's Footwear 
28 Cottage Ave. 
Quincy. 479-1717 
Heffernan's Shoes 

I* 14 Cottage Ave. 
Quincy, 471-9330 



Parkway Lighting Center 
1235 Furnace Brook Pkwy 
Quincy, 472-1800 



Austin Radio 8j TV Inc. 
53 Franklin Street 
Quincy, 472-4775 
Warren Appliance Supply 
525 Washington St. 
Quincy. 471-0006 



UNIFORMS 



MUSIC 



South Shore Uniforms 
1659 Hancock Street 
Quincy, 471-0812 



WALLPAPER & PAINT 



Charles Bean Music Co. 
1598 Hancock Street 
Quincy. 472-7840 



B 8( D Wallpaper 
1552 Hancock St. 
Quincy. 472-5500 



»»m^»m»m»»»m»»»»»»»^m»»Mmm.mMMM..MMMM^^M^^^..M....f.^f.f.f.^.^f..^^f.f.^f.f.f.f.f.f.f.f.ff.f.f.f.f.f.f.^ff^g.f.f^^ggg^^^ 



Page 10 Quincy Sun Wednesday, July 3, 1974 



• Along The Campaign Trail 

Thomas Brownell Seeks Second Term 



Rep. Thomas F. Brownell 
[D-Quincy] announces his 
candidacy for re-election in the 
Second Norfolk District. 

At the end of this year, 
Brownell will be completing his 
first full term in the state 
legislature. In seeking a second 
term, he said he "wants to 
continue his efforts to bring 
about meaningful reforms to 
make state government work 
better and be more responsive to 
people's needs." 

Brownell is married and lives 
with his wife, the former 
Margaret Donovan, and two 
children, Karyn, 2, and David, 5 
months, at 15 Moreland Road, 
Merrymount. A graduate of 
Quincy schools, he holds a B.S. 
degree "cum laude" from 
Suffolk University, graduated in 
the top 10 of his law class at 
Suffolk Law School where he 
received a Juris Doctor degree in 
1967. From 1968 to 1970, he 
attended part-time at Boston 
University Graduate Law 
Taxation Program, during which 
time he was Legislative Counsel 
for the Massachusetts Taxpayers 
Foundation, a statewide civic 
group dedicated to economy in 
government. 



Since 1970, Brownell has 
been a part-time lecturer in 
government at Suffolk 
University. Recently • he was 
appointed to the faculty of 
Suffolk Law School as a 
part-time lecturer in law. This 
month, he was appointed 
Credentials Chairman of the 
11th Congressional Democratic 
Caucus held in Braintree by 
Congressman James A. Burke 
and elected to the Board of 
Governors of the Quincy Bar 
Association. 

During his legislative career, 
he has served on the legislative 
Committees on Insurance and 
Local Affairs, and also was a 
member of the Special 
Legislative Committee in the 
Matter of the Removal of Judge 
Jerome P. Troy. 

Currently he is serving as a 
member of the Judiciary 
Committee where he sponsored 
and supported legislation to 
improve the judge selection 
process, divorce reform and to 
improve the quality and 
administration of justice. 

This year two bills sponsored 
by Brownell providing sorely 
needed property tax relief for 
the property owners in the City 



of Quincy are slated to become 
law. Together both measure H. 
2828 and H. 2829 will save 
Quincy taxpayers over 
$1,182,000 for 1974. For many 
years, he said, Quincy has been 
paying more than it should in 
county assessments, and also has 
been short-changed in its gas 
receipts. His legislation corrects 
both situations so that Quincy 
will pay a fair county and 
receive its correct amount of gas 
tax receipts, he said. "Saving 
Quincy taxpayers over a million 
dollars can only be regarded as 
one of the most important 
achievements of the 1974 
legislative session," he said. 

Brownell cites property tax 

relief as one major area where 

people are crying out for change 

and help. One of the original 

sponsors of "circuit breaker" 

concept of property tax relief 

legislation, Brownell has been 

fighting for legislation that 

would limit a homeowner's 

property tax payment to no 

more than 8 per cent of his 

useable income. He believes 

property taxes should be based 

on a person's ability to pay, not 

on a theoretical arbitrary value 

established by an assessor. 



Herbert Reppucci Candidate 
For State Representative 



Herbert Reppucci of 62 
Shirley St., West Quincy, a 
WoUaston businessman for the 
past 20 years, announces his 
candidacy for state 
representative from the new 
Fourth Norfolk District as an 
independent. 

Reppucci, defined the issues 
as "crime in the streets, the 
dump situation, the construction 
of the South Quincy MBTA 
station and taxes." 

"Our present state 
representative has constantly 
voted on Beacon Hill for 
programs that a's not only 
expensive to the taxpayers but 



moreover are completely out of 
step with the feelings of his 
constituents," he said. 

"We in West Quincy have 
been fighting the situation at the 
dump for over two years yet the 
present representative has only 
become involved in the past two 
weeks. Where was he when the 
situation was developing? 

"To curb crime in the streets, 
I support the reinstatement of a 
mandatory death penalty for all 
first degree murderers; and I also 
support the tightening of prison 
furlough regulations." 

The area covered by the new 
Fourth Norfolk District is part 
of the old Third Norfolk 



District, currently represented 
by Reps. Joseph E. Brett and 
William D. Delahunt. Delahunt is 
running for re-election in the 
Fourth. 

Reppucci, who studied 
business administration at 
Boston University and 
criminology at MIT, is a member 
of the Sons of Italy, the Quincy 
Citizens Association, the South 
West Community Council and 
the South Quincy Civic 
Association. 

He is married to the former 
M. June Luther and they have 
one son, Michael W. Reppucci, 

22. 



Alan Boyd Candidate For Sheriff 



• Alan J. Boyd of 89 Walnut 
St., Braintree, formerly of 
Quincy, announces he is a 
candidate for the Democratic 
nomination for sheriff of 
Norfolk County. Boyd attended 
the Quincy school system 
through high school. He is 35, 
married to the former Beverly 
(Sadler] of Canton," and father 
of five. Boyd served two years in 
the U.S. Navy. 

He is employed by the 
Registry of Motor Vehicles and 
has been an Inspector for the 
past seven years. He has been 



attending Massasoit College for 
the past two years to receive his 
Associate Degree in Law 
Enforcement in June of 1975. 
Some of the courses required to 
attain this degree are: 
Corrections and Administration, 
Police Organization and 
Management, Juvenile 
Delinquency, and Psychology. 

Boyd has been a member of 
the Braintree Yacht Club for the 
past 10 years and is also Past 
Commander of Chapter 29, 
Disabled American Veterans, 
Braintree. He is currently a life 



member. 

With his background in Law 
Enforcement and his education 
in related fields, Boyd said he 
feels he qualifies to fill the 
responsible position which he 
seeks, f 

"I am not and never have 
been politically motivated, but 
am greatly interested in the area 
of corrections, and what can be 
done to improve the rapport 
with the incarcerated, and also 
to gain the confidence of society 
in the rehabilitated offender," 
he said. 



Reception Held For Rep. Clifford Marshall 



A reported 2,200 guests and 
campaign workers attended a 
reception for Rep. Clifford H. 
Marshall, candidate for Norfolk 
County sheriff, held recently at 
State Street South, North 
Quincy. 

Marshall, his wife Louise, and 
their four sons greeted those 
attending. 

Marshall, a Marine Corp 



veteran, and Quincy City 
Councillor for five terms, is now 
an assistant majority leader of 
the House of Representatives. 
He is a member of the Joint 

Committees on Counties and 
Rules, and three special 
Commissions: to Reorganize the 
Department of Youth Services, 
State Aid to Cities and Towns 
for the Prevention of Juvenile 



Historic IMoments 



DECLARATION OK'D 

On July 4, 1776, the 
amended E)eclaration of In- 
dependence was approved by 
Omgre&s, with only New York 
abstaining. 



50TH STAR 

The fiftieth star was added 
to the U.S. flag with Hawaii's 
admission to the Union on 
July 4, 1960. 



Delinquency and to study 
human development and 
conditions in the Massachusetts 
Correctional System. He was 
recently elected chairman of the 
Eastern Regional Conference on 
Law Enforcement and Criminal 
Justice. 

Representative Marshall has 
served in the Massachusetts 
House of Representatives since 
1969. 



DOUBLE DEATHS 

On July 4, 1826, former 
Presidents John Adams and 
Thomas Jefferson both died — 
on the fiftieth anniversary of 
the Declaration of In- 
dependence. Former Presi- 
dent James Monroe died this 
day in 1831. 




9^ ■ ' ,y^>n// Jt 



WILLIAM A. OLSON [left], foreman of the mails at the Quincy 
Post Office, receives a special cake from Superintendent Tom O'Neill 
on his retirement after 43 years with the department. 
[Quincy Sun Photo by Laban Whittaker] 

William Olson Retires From 
Post Office After 43 Years Service 

Fellow workers honored 
William A. Olson at a surprise 
party recently on the eve of his 
retirement after 43 years with 
the Post Office Department. 

He was presented with gifts 
and a special cake by fellow 
employees. 

Olson, who lives at 1322 
Quincy Shore Drive, joined the 
Post Office in 1931 as a 
temporary summer worker and 



had been foreman of the mails in 
Quincy for eight years when he 
retired. 

A native of Dorchester, he 
served in the 82nd Airborne 
Division in the African and 
European Theaters during World 
War II. He has lived in Quincy 
for the past 25 years. 

He and his wife, Olive, have 
two daughters, Cathlene and 
Arlene. 



Ceremonies July 11 
To Honor John Q. Adams 



Special ceremonies Thursday, 
July 11 at 10 a.m. will mark the 
207th anniversary of the birth of 
John Quincy Adams, the sixth 
President of the United States. 

They will take place on the 
steps of the United First Parish 
Church, Quincy Sq., where John 
Quincy Adams is buried along 
with his father. President John 
Adams. 

The official wreath from 
President Richard Nixon, will be 
presented by Commander James 
Schneider, USN, of the Naval 
Reserve Center, Quincy. 

Receiving the wreath on 
behalf of the City of Quincy will 
be Mayor Walter J. Hannon and 



City Council President Arthur H. 
Tobin. Rev. John R. Graham 
will receive the wreath for the 
"Church of the Presidents". 

The public is invited to attend 
the ceremony. Quincy is the 
only city in the United States 
where two Presidents of the 
nation were born and are buried. 

A color guard from the 
United States Navy will be 
present as will a contingent of 
Naval Sea Cadets. 

Following the ceremonies on 
the steps of the church, the 
wreath from the President will 
be laid on the tomb of John 
Quincy Adams in the crypt 
beneath the church. 



Seniors Half - Fare 
Registration Here July 9 



Registration for MBTA Senior 
Citizen half-fare ID cards will be 
held in Quincy on July 9, from 9 
a.m. to noon and from 1:30 
p.m. to 3:30 p.m. 

The location will be the 
auditorium at the John F. 
Kennedy Health Center, 1120 
Hancock St., Quincy, originally, 
the registration was to be held at 
the Woodward School. 

The registration is for senior 
citizens who have reached the 
age of 65 and have not yet 
apphed or have lost their 



half-fare passes. 

To be eligible for the 
identification cards, which 
contain the name and address of 
the holder and a color 
photograph for positive 
identification, the senior citizen 
must bring proof of age, such as 
a Medicare card, birth 
certificate, baptismal record or 
drivers license. 

Also proof of residency in one 
of the 79 communities in the 
MBTA district and a 50 cent 
cash fee are required. 



Quincy Community Co-op 
To Accept Food Stamps 



The Quincy Community Food 
Co-op has been authorized by 
the United States Department of 
Agriculture to accept Food 
Stamps. 

Thus, those people in the area 
who are participating in the 
Food Stamp Program may 
achieve a double savings by 
participating in the Food Co-op. 

The basic premise of the 
Quincy Community Food Co-op 
is that by combining a number 
of households' food orders into 



one large order, food can be 
bought at wholesale prices. 

The Co-op operates out of the 
South-West Community Center, 
372 Granite St., Telephone 
471-0796. 

Membership is open to 
anyone, regardless of income or 
geographic location. 

Food may be ordered on 
Tuesday or Thursday from 2 - 8 
p.m. The food may be picked up 
on the following Thursday 
between 2 - 8 p.m. 




he first American "Stars and Stripes" on a ship at sea was 
displayed on November 1, 1777, by the Ranger, command 
cd by John Paul Jones, sailing from Portsmouth, N.H. 



Wednesday, July 3, 1974 Quincy Sun Page 1 1 



Sunbeams 



Letter Box 



Want To Reach 90? 
DonH Smoke, Drink, Worry 

By HENRY BOSWORTH 

If you want to live to 90 and feel spry enough to look forward to 
your 100th, listen to Roland [Pop] Josselyn of Houghs Neck. 

Pop, sporting a colorful crown on his head--and looking like he 
just stepped out of one of those margarine TV commercials-was 
honored Saturday at an open house and dinner. 

And, of course, he was asked the inevitable question: Do you have 
a formula for longevity? 

"Yep", replied Pop. "It's simple. Don't drink. Don't smoke and 
don't worry. Most of the things you worry about, don't happen 
anyway." 

How about diet. Is he careful about what he eats. 

"Nope," he said. Eat all you want. I eat everything that comes by 
me. If it's edible, I eat it and enjoy it. 

The open house for which half of Houghs Neck must have turned 
out for, was held at the home of his granddaughter and her husband, 
Mr. and Mrs. William MacDonald of 1 109 Sea St. 

There were a lot of signs posted for the occasion including one 
proclaiming Pop "Hough;; Neck's best friend." 

And there was one that reminded all attending that on June 29, 
1984 Pop will celebrate his 100th birthday. 

"But it won't be held here," said MacDonald. "We'll need Boston 
Garden for that one." 

Pop asked everybody to be sure to remember the date: June 29, 
1984. ^^^ 

THE GOOD OLD DAYS -- If the city changes at all in the passing 
years, it's only in dimension. 

Council President Arthur H. Tobin was speaking the other day 
about the Chief of Police who asked the City Council for an increase 
in his budget so that his men could better protect the city against 
the rising number of crimes. 

He said he figured $2,500 would do the job nicely. 

He was the chief of the Quincy Police Department in 1888, the 
first year of its existence, and his little band of 21 t)fficers had made 
185 arrest?, one of them for the rare crime of breaking and entering. 

"If someone had praised them for their police work they would 
have said, 'We're just doing our job'," Tobin told the 1^)74 Quincy 
police at their memorial services for departed comrades. 

WELL, THAT'S POLITICS: Tom O'Neill, 111. son of House 
Majority Leader Tom [Tip] O'Neill, dropped into The Sun otTice 
the other day campaigning for lieutenant governor. Wliile here, 
someone remarked: 

"1 saw your father on TV the other night." 

"That's the only time we see him, too," smiled young O'Neill. 

*** 

JAMES MICHAEL CURLEY really left his mark. The Norfolk 
County treasurer now has envelopes spelling t)ut in capital letters his 
name: JAMES MICHAEL COLLINS. 

*** 

FAMILY FRIEND: Paul Barry of Quincy is one of the Democrats 
who hope to wrest the sheriffs badge away from Republican 
incumbent Charles Hedges. 

Coincidentally, Barry's late father, Edward, long-time assistant 
clerk of Boston Municipal Clerk, and Hedges went to Quincy High 
School together. 

**¥ 

MILESTONES: Two well known Quincy figures will celebrate 
birthdays July 31. Hattiemay Thomas, city clerk back in the I940's, 
will be 85... And, former Mayor Amelio Delia Chiesa will be 74. 

Incidentally do you remember when Delia Chiesa, self-styled 
penny pincher, used to walk around City Hall turning off lights? 
Those were the simple days even though they weren't too long ago. 



TICKLE BOX 



by Ted Trogdon 




VACANCY 

' ' • ' ' T -^^ 



Likes Wheel 

Chair Ramps At 

Mclntyre Mall 

Editor, Quincy Sun: 

The impact of the recently 
completed landscaping of 
Mclntyre Mall is quite dramatic. 
The azaleas, "instant lawn" and 
lighting make for a show place in 
the center of the city. 

But of all the features of this 
park, I'd like to compliment 
Mayor hannon and Public Works 
Commissioner James Ricciuti for 
including in the design two 
wheel chair ramps at the curbs 
near City Hall. A six inch curb 
can be a tremendous barrier to 
many handicapped people. 

I'm hopeful that similar ramps 
can be included in the design of 
future sidewalk projects in 
Quincy Center to help make 
schools, parks, transportation, 
and shopping areas more 
accessible for the city's 
handicapped citizens. 

Paul D. Harold 
31 Riverside Ave. 

A 'Thank You^ 
From Marianns 

Editor, Quincy Sun: 

Just a brief "thank-you" from 
St. Ann's Marianns for your 
many kindnesses on our behalf 
during the past months. We 
enjoyed a very successful year 
and feel your efforts played a 
part in our success. Many 
Thanks. 

Anita Milano, President 

Nancy Kearns, 

Publicity Chairman 

Burke Chairs 
Insurance 
Hearings 

Congressman James A. Burke 
[D-Miltonj presided as chairman 
over the Mouse Ways and Means 
Committee's hearings on 
National Health Insurance, last 
week. Burke has chairfed over 90 
percent of the committee's 
hearings on this issue. 



PoeVs Corner 



1-15 



'George, wake up! There's o mote! with o vocarKy! 



/ REMEMBER 
PAPA 

Nineteen years have gone by 
without him and sometimes I 
wonder how 

Remembering his love for 
everyone makes it seem bearable 
now. 

I remember when he played 
his accordion. 

How my heart would swell 
with pride. 

As I looked at the others 
approval for I never left his side. 

No gathering was complete 
without him. 

He made many a happy day. 

Who could feel sad or 
downhearted. 

When the Mazurka's and 
Waltzes he'd play. 

The memories of my 
childhood are precious, 

To Mama, my three sisters 
and I. 

I'll carry them with me my 
lifetime 

But someday they too will 
die. 

Rose Crowley, 
327 Washington St., Quincy. 



Living, Today 

By Dr. William F. Knox 
Personal' Counse 



'Nobody Taught Me To Ditch' 



"Nobody taught me how to 
ditch" ... said Malcolm. I was 
taught how to succeed in 
business ... how to play 80 golf 
after 40 ... how to beat the IRS 
legitimately. But nobody taught 
me how to ditch." He was 
referring to his recent divorce. 

Malcolm had been married 
nineteen years. He and Mary had 
had their "ups and downs" ... 
and finally separated. Whose 
fault? What difference does it 
make? They were both unhappy 
... the marriage had become 
destructive. Mutually they 
agreed ... as two intelligent 
adults that the best solution was 
divorce ... "no fault divorce". 

But for Malcolm it was a 
devastating experience. That's 
what Malcolm meant by 
"nobody taught me to ditch". 
He had been a Navy pilot. He 
was taught in the Navy how to 
ditch a plane. "But nobod', 
taught me how to ditch a 
marriage." 

He had several problems. One 
was that he didn't know how to 
TAKE CARE OF HIMSELF. He 
had never cooked ... never done 
his own laundry ... never made 
his own bed. His mother ... or 
his wife had always selected his 
clothes. The every day 
mechanics of living were more 
than Malcolm could cope with 
alone. "Nobody taught me how 
to ditch." 

Secondly ... Malcolm 
MISSED HIS CHILDREN. They 
were 17-16 and 13 ... all busy in 
school ... with their friends ... 
and part time jobs. They were 
not much concerned about their 



mother's and father's life 
problems. They had their own 
lives to live. Malcolm missed the 
day to day contact with his 
children. So far as his children 
were concerned ... "nobody 
taught me how to ditch". 

The most severe part of his 
unsuccessful "ditching" was the 
AWFUL LONLINESS. When he 
was home he had a garden ... 
there were the high school sports 
events in which his boy 
participated ... there were the fix 
-it jobs on the property. Now in 
divorce and in an apartment he 
had none of these 
responsibilities. He took walks 
many nights ... alone ... 
remembering how he used to 
play with his dog in his yard 
whde his wife sat on the steps. 
Now in the apartment ... no dog 
... no yard ... no wife. "Nobody 
taught me how to ditch". 

With the increasing number 

of divorces realism seems to 

dictate that somebody needs to 

teach people "how to ditch." Is 

it more difficult for men ... or 

women? It all depends on the 

individual man and woman. It 

isn't easy for either. More next 

time on some ditching 

suggestions that would have 

helped Malcolm. 

* * • • 

FOR YOUR COMMENTS - 

For private counseling, 
telephone counseling, group 
counseling, contact Dr. Knox at 
659-7595 or 326-5990. For his 
book "People Are For Loving" 
send $3.00 to Dr. Knox at 320 
Washington Street, Norwell, 
Mass. 02061. 



Over 1,000 Apply 
For Food Stamps 



[Cont'd from Page Ij 

family "adjusted net income", 
figured from a 6-page 
' application, determines not only 
whether a person can buy food 
stamps, but how many and at 
what price. 

This means that the "bonus 
value" of the stamps can vary 
considerably from one applicant 
to the next. For example: a 
single person with adjusted net 
income of $170 per month 
would pay $36 for stamps worth 
$46 in the market, a "bonus 
value of 22%". 

A family of eight, on the 
other hand, with adjusted net 
income of $400 per month 
would pay $117 worth $256 at 
the market, a "much larger 
bonus value of 54%." 

The Welfare Department is 
processing applications along a 
carefully determined set of 
statewide priorities, according to 
DePietro and Provencher. 

The first priority is persorts 
whose income is so limited that 
they requi/e financial assistance 
for the basics of food, clothing 
and shelter; namely, welfare 
recipients. Second is non-welfare 
recipients who are now enrolled 
in the Donated Commodities 
Program "Surplus Foods". Third 
is any other citizen who wishes 
to apply. 

The first group has received 
forms by mail. The second group 
can pick up forms during the 
regularly scheduled monthly 
food distribution in each 
community. The third group can 
get an application by writing, 
calling, or visiting the nearest 
Welfare Office in the South 
Shore area, or by contacting the 
Quincy Community Action 
Organization at South-West 
Community Center, 372 Granite 
St., Quincy. [471-0796], or 
Germantown Service Center, 9' 



Bicknel! 
[471-1189] 



St. 



Quincy, 



Other small clusters of 
volunteers are also becoming 
active in some communities, and 
details about them can be 
obtained from the Welfare 
Offices or the Community 
Action offices. 

The Quincy Community 
Action Organization, a private 
non-profit organization, has 
hired three part-time workers to 
help launch the Food Stamp 
Program. According to DePietro, 
this is "a good exarnple of public 
agency /private agency 
cooperation." These three 
workers will be available to go 
out along with trained 
volunteers to explain and help 
establish the Food Stamp 
Program anywhere in the South 
Shore area. 

Provencher also noted that 
upon being found eligible, an 
applicant receives a letter of 
notification and an ID card. 
These items, however, are not 
enough to present at a 
participating bank to make a 
purchase. The person must wait 
until he itceives in July and each 
month thereafter an 

"Authorization to Purchase" 
produced by computer and sent 
by mail to the person's home. 
This authorization will repeat 
the number of coupons which 
can be purchased, their price, 
and the Bonus Value. 

The Welfare Offices in the 
South Shore are: South Shore 
Community Service Center, 23 
School St., Quincy; Hin^am 
Welfare Service Office, 7 East 
St., Hingham; Randolph Welfare 
Service Office, 1 Turner Lane, 
Randolph; and Weymouth 
Welfare Service Office, 1431 
neasant St., East Weymouth. 



Pige 12 Quincy Sun Wednesday, July 3, 1974 



Shipbuilders Coop Plans Name 
Change To Tresidential Coop' 



Francis X. McCauley, 
president and treasurer of 
Shipbuilders Cooperative Bank, 
1 Granite St., Quincy, 
announces that a meeting of the 
Bank's shareholders has been 
called for Monday, July 22, at 
3:45 p.m. at the bank's office to 
act on a change of bank name. 

If the proposal is approved by 
the share holders, the new name 
will be "Presidential Cooperative 
Bank". 

The name change, which has 
already been unanimously 
approved by the Board of 
Directors of the bank, is being 
proposed to eliminate confusion 
which has existed for many 
years since many people believe 
that the bank deals only with 



shipyard employees. 

Although the bank was 
established in January, 1920 by 
a group of Fore River 
employees, the bank has no 
affiliation or business 
connection with either 
Bethlehem Steel or its successor 
at Fore River, the General 
Dynamics Company, McCauley 
noted. 

When the bank first opened, 
office space in the shipyard was 
provided by the Bethlehem Steel 
Company. In the late 1920's, the 
bank's offices were moved to 
Quincy Sq. over the present 
Burgin & Plainer Insurance 
Company office. The bank 
subsequently was located on the 
second floor of the South Shore 



National Bank ' and at 1 S 
Chestnut St. before moving in 
1965 to its present location at 
the corner of Granite and 
Hancock Sts. 

TJie Shipbuilders Cooperative 
Bank is a state chartered 
cooperative bank offering the 
same services as the state's 144 
other cooperative banks. Its 
services are available to all 
persons and they are not 
restricted to employees of the 
shipyard. 

McCauley said the Board of 
Directors believes it is in the best 
interests of the bank to 
eliminate the image projected by 
the name "Shipbuilders" and to 
change the name to "Presidential 
Cooperative Bank". 



-I 



Business News 



Colonial Federal Offers New 
Service On Social Security Checks 




Colonial Federal Savings and 
Loan Association of Quincy has 
begun a new community service. 

Area residents receiving 
monthly Social Security checks 
may have these checks sent by 
the government directly to their 



savings accounts at Colonial 
Federal Savings. Money can then 
be withdrawn as needed. 

According to President Philip 
J. Lawrence, this service marks 
the first step towards an electric 
funds transfer system whereby 



RENT A 
NEW CAR 



fT(lE f^ATIONVvlDE RESERVATIONS 

WE RENT FORDS AND OTHER FINE CARS 

FREE OUT OFTOWN RESERVATIONS — 800-874 5000 

(no charge to calling party) 

ECOMO'CJU^ '* Jf/!«7C£ OF htZllS '.not .u (^ 



the government and banks will 
eventually credit bank accounts 
electronically. The cost, 
inconvenience and possible loss 
of checks will thus be 
eliminated. At the same time, 
the depositor earns interest on 
the money in his account. 

This electric system can help 
to eliminate the theft of checks 
from mail boxes, the bother of 
cashing monthly checks and the 
danger of toting a sum of money 
for a good part of the month. 

Colonial Federal Savings also 
offers a NOW account which 
pays interest from day of 
deposit to day of withdrawal. 
NOW accounts are also available 
to senior citizens without the 
15-cent check service charge. 



BANK AMERICARD AGENT - Charles A. Pearce, president of 
Quincy Savings Bank shakes hands with William W. O'Brien, Jr., 
Assistant Treasurer of the State Street Bank and Trust Co. of 
Boston, after signing an agreement that makes Quincy Savings Bank 
an agent for Bank Americard. 

Quincy Savings Agent 
For Bank Americard 



Quincy Savings Bank has 
become an authorized agent fOr 
Bank Americard by signing an 
agreement with State Street 
Bank and Trust Company of 
Boston. 

Upon signing this agreement, 
Quincy Savings Bank joins a vast 
network of banks and merchants 
nationally and worid-wide that 
will honor Bank Americard 
credit and cash advance 
transactions. 

After the signing, Charles A. 



Pearce, president of the bank 
said: 

"We are pleased to become a 
part of the Bank Americard 
system, that will offer card 
holders instant credit and cash 
whenever or wherever the need 
arises. And as newer, simpler, 
more convenient ways of 
handling financial transactions 
are made available, Quincy 
Savings will make every effort to 
offer them to the public." 



S.S. Chamber U.S. Commerce Dept. Associate 




The South Shore Chamber of 
Commerce has been named an 
associate office of the 

Department of Commerce by 
Frederick B. Dent, United States 
Secretary of Commerce, 

announces Thomas HoUyday of 
the Boston District Office of the 
Department of Commerce. 



Since last June, 206 new 
members have joined the South 
Shore Chamber of Commerce 
which represents the business 
communities of Braintree, 

Canton, Cohasset, Hanover, 
Hingham, Holbrook, Hull, 
Milton, Norwell, Quincy, 
Randolph, Rockland, Scituate 
and Weymouth. 



The South Shore Chamber is 
the fastest growing Chamber in 
the Commonwealth of 
Massachusetts and currently 
ranks fourth in size in the state. 

An update of the 1974 
program of Work and a tour of 
the physical plant will highlight 
the reception program, hosted 
by George keardon, president of 
the South Shore Chamber. 



Peter Killelea Marks 40th Year With Boston Gas 



Peter J. Killelea, Jr. of 56 
Scotch Pond Place, Quincy, 
vice-president of industrial 
relations at Boston Gas, 
celebrated his 40th anniversary 
with the company recently and 
was honored at a luncheon. 

KUleiea began his career with 
Boston Gas as an appliance 
delivery-man ip 1934, and has 



been employed for the past 35 
years in the industrial relations 
department. 

Formerly of Hyde Park, he 
was an all-scholastic end at Hyde 
Park High School, from which 
he graduated in 1929. He also 
played end for the Boston 
College . football team in 
1931-33j |ind tecehred his degree 



shortly before joining Boston 
Gas. 

A Quincy resident since 1943, 
he is a former scoutmaster of St. 
John's Church and presently 
serves on the City's Salary 
Survey Committee. 

He and his wife, Ann, have 
five children and 11 
grandchildren. 



Save Gas and Money 
shop locally. 




Donna Hogan Named 
Telephone Programmer 



Donna L. Hogan of 17 Union 
St., Quincy, was recently 
appointed New England 
Telephone - programmer in 



THE PRICE 
IS UP ON 

SCRAP 

Copper, Brass, Cast Iron 
and Steel 

PDM 

The Nome in Scrap 

on The South Shore 

175 Intervale St., Quincy 

formerly HaYr)tt Scrap Yard 

472-9251 



NEWSBOYS WANTED 
Here's a chance to earn extra 
money by building a Quincy 
Sun honne delivery route. 

Telephone: 471-3100 



Boston. 

Miss Hogan joined the 
company in 1970 as a service 
representative in Quincy and has 
also served as instructor in 
Taunton. 

A native of Quincy, she 
graduated from Quincy High 
School, Quincy Junior College, 
Class of 1 968 and Boston State 
College, Class of 1970. 



WANT SOME 
HELP? 

ILL'S TRUCKING^ 

773-8170 



PICKUPS 

AND 
DELIVERIES 



Squantum Residents 
Forming Association 



Wednesday, July 3. 1974 Quincy Sun Page 13 



Squantum residents are 
forming an association to foster 
community spirit and confront 
the problems faced by the 
peninsula community. 

The organizational meeting 
was held June 26 at which a 
steering committee was formed 
to investigate similar 
organizations, publicize the 
association and draw up a set of 
proposed by-laws. 

James Coughlin was named 



chairman, Robert Gorrill, 
vice-chairman, Sally Wainwiight, 
secretary, Martha Regan 
publicity and Grace Saphir, head 
of the by-laws committee. 

The steering committee is to 
report back to the general 
assembly July 10 at 8 p.m. at 
the First Church in Squantum. 

Squantum residents interested 
in joining the association may 
call Martha Regan at 328-1491 
or 328-5 124. 



Dr. Charles Merrill 

Attends London Health 

Services Convention 



Dr. Charles MenUl of 204 
BUlings St.,' NortK""t)uincy, has 
returned from a one-week trip to 
London, England where he 
attended the International 
Hospital and Health Services 
Exhibition. 

Dr. Merrill who is president of 
the Board of Trustees of the 
Huntington General Hospital 
and chairman of the Board of 
Directors of the Longwood 
Hospital attended as an official 
delegate by invitation of the 
British consulate. 

Dr. Merrill also spent several 
hours as the guest of the "House 
Governor", an English term of 
Administrator, at St. George's 
Hospital, London. The hospital 
was built in 1730, and has a 
300-bed capacity plus a 30-bed 
maternity ward. It has but two 



eletrators, one for people and 
one for freight, plus a manually 
operated lift. The lift was 
operated by a porter cranking an 
enormous wheel. 

Said Dr. MerrUl: "The 
hospital was spotless, the 
equipment satisfactory, and 
personnel dedicated. How they 
accomplishe'd their objectives 
under such handicaps was a 
marvel to behold. St. George's 
Hospital has also a medical 
school attached to it which has a 
long tradition in medical history. 
The Administrator took us to 
the library where he proudly 
displayed the cowhide from the 
cow that Dr. Jenner did his 
original work on, developing 
cowpox as a form of vaccination 
for the prevention of smallpox." 



Stephen Vining Photo 
Exhibit At N.Q. Library 



Stephen Vining of Mansfield, 
is exhibiting his photographs in 
the North Quincy Branch of the 
Thomas Crane Public Library 
during July. 

While stationed in Germany, 
Vining worked as an Army 

John Poutree Returns 



photographer, and a lab 
technician. He won first place in 
a slide contest sponsored by the 
Army. He has recently been 
studying photography with Ron 
Goodman at Quincy Junior 
College. 



From Submarine Operations 



Navy Aviation Ordnanceman 
First Class John R. Poutree, son 
of Mr. and Mrs. Theodore R. 
Poutree of 10 Wilson Court, 
North Quincy, returned to the 
Naval Air Station, Brunswick, 
Me., with Anti-Submarine Patrol 
Squadron 26 after five months 
of extended operations. 

As a member of the squadron, 
he participated in active support 
of the U.S. Sixth Fleet units in 
the Mediterranean and North. 



Atlantic. 



I 



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LINDA WALKER demonstrates a simulated proposal fbr-the prevention of large biological changes in 
the ecosystem of Black's Creek at the Atlantic-North Junior High School science fair. Watching her are 
[left to right] Fair Director Brooks Maloof , Mark Feeney, David Bann and Christopher Goulart. 

24 8th Graders Win Awards At Atlantic Junior 



Twenty-four eighth graders at 
Atlantic Junior High School 
received honors at the final 
assembly of the school year. 

Principal Arnold A. Rubin 
presented the John A. Evans 
Award to Paul Collins and Betsy 
Johnson who best represent the 
ideals of good citizenship, 
scholarship and leadership. 

Principal's Awards for 
exemplary service and loyalty to 
the school were presented to 
David Carr, Mark DiMino, John 
MacDonald, Maureen McKay, 
Cheryl Maffie, Kathleen 
Morrissey, Karen Pike and Mark 
Robinson. 

Debbie Alessi, Susan Cooper, 
James Butler and Russell 
Chisholm received LeRoy 
Rogers Awards for 
sportsmanship. 



"Top Ten" Scholarship 
Awards, given to those students 
having the highest quality point 
average over a two-year peritjd, 
were won by Patricia Symonds, 
Adam Nagy, Denise Duchainey, 
Karen Daly, Betsy Johnson, 



Kathryn Forrest, Margaret Shea, 
Donna Shea, Bernadette Feeney 
and Donna Chiampa. 




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NORTH QUINCY 

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47J HANCOCK STREET ^ - i 
NORTH QUINCY, MASS. 02171 
472-1167 



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Glass 

Sacrete Products 

Dutch Boy Paints 

Benjamin Moore Paints 

General Hardware Supplies 



Trewax 
Plumbing Supplies 
Scotts Lawn Products 
Hand & Power Tools 
Agrico Lawn & Garden Products 



GE Bug Lights 2 fOT .750 Reg. 2/$ 1.05 



Scotch-Gard 
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Assorted Hot and Cold Dishes 

* Vegetables - Potatoes • Dessert 

* Cheeses - Coffee or Tea 

All this for only $3.00 



4it 



WALSH'S 
RESTAURANT 




QUIKCY 



Page 14 Quincy Sun Wednesday, July 3, 1974 

N.E. Nazarene Missionary 
Convention Being 

Held In WoUaston 



Rev. Dennis Schmelzenbach, 
missionary to South Africa, will 
be the guest speaker at the 55th 
Annual Missionary Convention 
of the New England District of 
the Nazarene World Missionary 
Society which is being held in 
the Lahue Center at Eastern 
Nazarene College and the 
Wollaston Church of the 
Nazarene today [Wednesday] 
and Thursday. 

Mrs. Albert D. Stiefel of 43 
Greene St., Wollaston, who has 
served as New England District 
president of the Nazarene World 
Missionary Society for the past 
five and a half years, will preside 
at the convention. The 
convention will conclude her 
official duties in this office as 
she will be moving to Nampa, 
Idaho, in August where Mr. 
Stiefel will be joining the 
faculty of Morthwest Nazarene 
College. 

The convention will begin 
with a Workshop Wednesday 
afternoon at 1:30 p.m. in the 
Wollaston Church. The evening 
missionary rally will be held in 
Lahue Center at 7:30 with Rev. 
Schmelzenbach as speaker. 



Included will be the presentation 
of the convention theme 
"Declare His Glory To All The 
People" under the direction of 
Mrs. Donald Irwin, Vice 
President. Rev, Donald Irwin is 
superintendent of the New 
England District of the Church 
of the Nazarene and will preside 
at the District Assembly to be 
held in Lahue Center Thursday, 
Friday and Saturday. 

Business sessions for the 
Missionary Convention will be 
held Thursday morning and 
afternoon in the Wollaston 
Church of the Nazarene. Rev. 
Mr. Schmelzenbach spoke to the 
Wollaston Neighbors, the seniors 
of the Wollaston Church, 
Tuesday noon, in Spangenberg 
Parlor of the Wollaston college. 
He was also the guest speaker for 
the Nazarene Young Peoples 
Society meeting in Lahue Center 
Tuesday evening. 

Rev. Mr. Schmelzenbach has 
spent this past week [June 
26-30] as special Chapel Speaker 
and Missions Consultant at the 
International Institute of the 
Nazarene Young Peoples Society 
of the Church of the Nazarene in 
Switzerland. 



4 From Quincy^ North 
Win Norwich Recognition 



Four students from Quincy 
and North Quincy earned 
recognition from Norwich 
University during the second 
semester of the 1973-74 college 
year. 

John C. Pearce III, son of Mr. 
and Mrs. John C. Pearce, Jr., 72 
Forbes Hill Rd, Quincy and . 
Jeffrey M. Volpe, son of Mr. and 
Mrs. John E. Volpe, Sr., 32 
Wesson Ave., were named to the 
Dean's List. 

They were also promoted to 



the rank of second lieutenant in 
the Corps of Cadets for the 
academic year, 1974-75. 

John P. Panarelli, son of Mr. 
and Mrs. Nicholas A. Panarelli, 
623 Quincy Shore Dr., North 
Quincy was promoted to 
captain. 

Robert A. Newcomb, son of 
Mr. and Mrs. Robert A-. 
Newcomb, Sr., 74 South 
Bayfield Rd, North Quincy, was 
promoted to corporal. 



Sgt. Forrest Smith In 
Commissioning Program 



Technical Sgt. Forrest E. 
Smith, son of Mr. and Mrs. 
Forrest G. Smith of 64 North 
Central Ave., Wollaston, has 
been selected for academic and 
military training under the U.S. 
Air Force Airman Education 
and Commissioning Program. 

Sergeant Smith, a weather 
observer at Maurice Rose Army 
Airfield, Germany, will enter the 
University of Massachusetts at 
Amherst, to study for a 
bachelor's degree in business. 



Following graduation, he will go 
to Officer Training School 
[OTS] at Lackland AFB, Tex. 

He will be commissioned an 
Air Force second lieutenant 
upon completion of OTS which 
is part of the vast Air Training 
Command education system. 

Smith graduated in 1962 from 
North Quincy High School and 
received his associate degree 
from the University of Maryland 
European Division in Frankfurt. 



SOUTH SHORE 
- SEWING MACHIINE CO 

We Service All Makes Sewing 
Machines an'd Vacuum Cleaners 
665A Hancock St., WoUaston 
471-5982 



WOLLASTON 

OEALE ST. off HANCOCK SI 

QUINCY PR 3-1600 



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JEREMY 

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Delivery 

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471-3100 



WOLLASTON 



Plenty Doing For Wollaston 
Youngsters On 4th 



Free ice cream, tonic and 
balloons will abound at a gala 
4th of July Field Day for 
Wollaston youngsters. 

The Field Day - to be held at 
Pageant Field - will kick-off with 
a Doll Carriage Parade at 9 a.m. 
for youngsters aged 3 to 7. 

Two more parades follow at 
9:30: a bicycle parade and a 
horrible's parade for youngsters 
14 and under. 

From 10:30 to noon there 
will be races - running, 
three-legged and wheel barrow - 
and contests - pie-eating, 
egg-throwing and foul-shooting. 

Prizes will be awarded to the 
winners of the parades, races and 
contests. 

The Community 
Improvement Committee of the 
Wollaston Juniors - headed by 

$43, 873 Grants 
For QJC, ENC 

Two Quincy colleges will 
receive grants totalling $43,873 
from the Department of Health, 
Education and Welfare, Office of 
Education. 

Congressman James A. Burke 
(D-Milton) announced that 
Eastern Nazarene College, which 
participated in National Defense 
Student Loan Program and in 
Supplemental Educational 
Opportunity Grants Program, 
will be awarded a total of 
$42,832. Of this sum, $35,828 
was received through the former 
program; the remaining $7,004 
through the latter. 

Quincy Junior College will 
receive $1,041 through its 
participation in National 
Defense Student Loan Program. 

Robert Benson 

Begins Seabee 

Training 

Navy Constructionman 
Apprentice Robert E. Benson, 
son of Carl E. Benson of 27 
Copley St., Wollaston, has begun 
Seabee training at the basic 
Utilitiesman School, Port 
Hueneme, Calif. 

A utilitiesman installs, 
maintains and repairs plumbing, 
heating, fuel systems, water 
treatment and distributioW ■ 
systems, air conditioning and 
refrigeration equipment and 
sewage disposal facilities. 
Seabees are trained to work 
under combat situations. 



Mrs. Pam Spring - is 
co-sponsoring the Field Day 
with the Wollaston Community 
Association, chaired by Mrs. 



Kathy Roberts. Aiding them are 
Mrs. Margaret Kelly, Mrs. 
Victoria Smith, Mrs. Carol 
Sarruda and Mrs. Fran Cook. 




, >"t % It* w* 



WOLLASTON SCHOOL fifth graders created large-scale paper 
iViache sculptures under the direction of Polyarts instructor Mrs. 
Virginia McDermott. Shelby Nickerson of 118 Old Colony Ave. 
holds a baby kangaroo while its mother waits beside Cheryl Ayles of 
140 Summit Ave. James Roache [below] of 214 Highland Ave. pats 
a five-foot elephant which he painted. 



3 From Quincy On Health Planning Committee 



Three Quincy men have been 
elected to the Area 524 [South 
Shore] Health Planning 



Committee of the Health 
Planning Council for Greaif^r 
Boston, Inc. ^^ 



ADMISSION $1.00 




WOLLASTON 
CREDIT UNION 

PERSONAL & AUTO LOANS 
NO NOTICE SAVINGS ACCTS. 
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NEWSBOYS WANTED 
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money by building a Ouincy 

Sun home delivery route. 

Telephone: 471-3100 




INDOOR FLAGS OUTDOOR 
ACCESSORIES 

FLAGS MADE TO ORDER 
Stat* Flags Church Fiagt 

Flags of All Nations 
EAGLE FLAG CO., INC. 
147 Itadi St., Wtltastan, Mass. 02170 
^_^^ Tel.,C17-472-8242 



They, ^^re iJRep, Thomas F. 
Brown^l;:> Rtfhfirt Hassey, 
director of Survival Inc.; and 
KeyiAjHickey,- .^ ., .^., -^ -. 

The' HPCG^' 1s'^ a non-profit 
planning and review agency 
made up of health professionals 
and consumers of health 
services. 

Rosemary Wahlberg, director 
of the Germantown 
Multi-Service Center, is chairman 
of the 524 committee. 



MUSIC LESSONS 

Professionai Instruction 
DRUM PIANO GUITAR 
BRASS REEDS 

WOLLASTON MUSIC CENTEI 
27Beal«StyWolla$ton 
Call 7^3-5325 



Wedne«day,July3, 1974QuiiicySunPige 15 



Young Ideas 

Unedited selections from the writings 
of Quincy's elementary school children. 



THE LIFE OF IVORY SOAP 

Hi, there! I'm a bar of Ivory 
Soap. 

We have different life spans. 
In a family who gets dirty quick 
it is very short. In a family who 
does not get dirty fast it is very 
long. 

I'm with a family that does 
not get dirty quick. 

Do you know how hard it is 
to be a bar of soap? Well, let me 
tell you, from a bar of soap with 
experience, its hard! 

You always get soap in your 
eyes. One day someone left me 
in the hot sun, I almost melted! 
One day I fell in the sink, and 
almost went down the drain. 
Sometimes they use me to wash 
the dishes, I almost drowned! 
Sometimes the kids like to 
sqeeze me, I'm telling you, its no 
way to lose weight! 

Well, tTiats my life. I was born 
five inches wide and three inches 
tall! Now I'm half a inch both 
ways!. 

Wish me luck, I'll need it! 

Michael Chopoorian 

WoUaston School 

Grade 6 

WITH A LITTLE BIT 
OF LUCK 

With a little bit of luck, 

1 could find a gold ingot. 

It would be worth one million 
and nine. 

But the best thing about it is 
it'l be all mine. 

1 could find a mine of gold. 

And it would be all mine to 
hold, 

With only a little bit of luck. 

With my millions of dollars in 
gold, 

I would buy a great big boat. 

I would sail round the world 
in the sea. 

Then who would be famous 
but me. 

Fame for taking the longest 
boat cruse, 

With only a little bit of luck. 

Oh boy, Oh my, for goodness 
sake. 

What if I found the gold to be 
fake. 

Oh boy, would my heart sink, 

I would really feel like a fink. 

No more millions of dollars 
for me, 

Well, you can't be that lucky 
you see. 

Jimmy Key 

Willard School 

Grade 6 



NEWSBOYS WANTED 
Here's a chance to earn extra 
money by building a Quincy 
Sun home delivery route. 

Telephone: 471-3100 



WOODWARD'S 

EXPERT 

FRONT END 

WORK 

AND 

ALIGNMENT 

111 Mayor McGratli Highway 
Quincy, Mass. 

TELEPHONE: 773-1200 



SAMMY SOCCER BALL 

Sammy Soccer Ball gets 
socked all around in the 
summer. 

Sammy, the poor soccer ball 
always plays ball and never goes 
to school. All he knows is how 
to play soccer. 

His mother and father art 
medicine balls. Sammy wouldn't 
like to be a person because peple 
have to work. 

Jeffrey Keefe 

Atherton Hough School 

Grade 4 



SPRING TIME 

Spring is a happy time for all. 
The birds sing and seek their 
homes. While the trees and 
flowers bloom, the birds have 
found their homes now., on the 
sunny, warm tree tops. I like 
summer too, but the season 
which I like the most is Spring. 
I love spring! 

Pamela McGunagle 

Atherton Hough School 

Grade 4 




HISTORIC FLIGHT - Capt. Andre Turcat, chief French test pilot, receives award from Norman Forde 
of Quincy, [right] , vice president of the Concorde Rubber Co., after landing supersonic jet Concorde at 
Logan International Airport June 13. Others are Capt. E. L. Miles, Concorde's chief British test pilot 
[left] and James Cannon, president of the Concorde Rubber Co. 

Comdr. Donald Forsyth Receives Masters^ Degree 



Comdr. Donald D. Forsyth, 
U.S.N. [Retired], formerly of 
Quincy, was awarded a master's 

degree in water resources 
engineering at recent graduation 
ceremonies at the University of 
Kansas. 



Comdr. Forsyth, who served 
28 years as a naval officer and 
naval aviator, is a graduate of 
Quincy High School, class of 
1943, and of Tufts University, 
class of 1 946. 

He is now a resident of 
Lawrence, Kans., with his wife 



and three sons. Son of the late Lt. 
Comdr. George D. Forsyth, 
U.S.N., and Mrs. Forsyth, he 

retams ties with Quincy through 
his sister. Miss Louise B. 
Forsyth, coordinator of testing 
for the Quincy Public Schools. 



V^. 



WOIUSTON 



Bank-Dine-Shop-Save 



Whatever your shopping 
needs the Wollaston area 
has a lot to offer. The 
Shopping Center is 



conveniently located at 
the corners of Hancock, 
Beach and Beale Streets. 
The stores listed on this 



page offer a wide variety 
of services and 
merchandise from 
Cameras, Insurance, Hair 



ALLAN'S TAPE & STEREO CTR. 

16 Beale St. 472-9698 
Open Daily 10 to 9 
Sat. Till 6 
ANDREA'S GIFT SHOPPE 

19A Beale St. 472-9697 
Open Mon. thru Sat. 9:30 to 5 
Arlyne Bearse and Grace Lutsky 

ARLENE'S BAKERY 

9 Beale St. 472-4025 
iDaily Bakery Specials 
]2 Large I'A lb. Loaves of Bread .99<f 

BARRY'S DELICATESSEN 

21 Beale St. 472-3n7 
Open Till 6:30 Daily 
BEACON CLEANSERS 

624 Harrcock St. 773-7400 

Open 7 A.M. to 6 P.M. 
CARITA COIFFEURS 

29 A Beale St. 471-6611 

Open 5 Days, Thurs. <fe Fri. Till 9, 

COLONIAL FEDERAL SAVINGS 
AND LOAN ASSOCIATION 

15 Beach St. 471-0750 
8 to 6 Weekdays, 8 to 7:30 Thursdays 
COTTAGE PAINT & WALLPAPER 

652 Hancock St. 479-7169 

Open 9 to 5:30 - Thurs. & Fri. Till 9 



FRANK EVANS CO. INC. 

343 Newport Ave. 479-1014 
Open 8 to 5 Daily 

GRANITE 5^ TO $1.00 

7 Beale St. 
Frank & Bob Braga 
Open 9:30 to 5:30 Fri. Till 8 
GREETING CARD SHOP 

15 Beale St. 472-1987 
Open 9:30 to 5:30 

HANCOCK BANK & TRUST CO. 

20 Beale St. 773-0500 

Open Thurs. 6 to 8 - Lobby 9 to 3 

Drive-Up 8:30 to 4:30 Daily 

HAPPY CHEF 

661 Hancock St. 472-9444 
Open Every Evening 

KEY TO ELEGANCE 

831 Hancock St. 471-2323 

Open 9:30 to 9 Fridays 

9:30 to 5 Daily, Except Friday 
LINCOLN PHARMACY 

716 Hancock St. 472-4246 
A. R. Murphy Jr., Reg. Pharm. 

Open Daily 8 to 9 Sun. 8 to 6 
MUG-'N-MUFFIN 

31 Beale St. 472-9641 

Open 7 A.M. to Midnite 



Styling, Music, 
Restaurants, Home 
Decorating and 
Remodeling, Cards and 
Gifts. 

NOBLE'S CAMERA SHOP 

680 Hancock St. 773-6077 
Open 9:30 to 6 Daily, Fri. Till 8 

PURITY SUPREME 

615 Hancock St. 
Open Every Evening 

RAFAELA COIFFEURS 

672 Hancock St. 472-9229 
Open Thurs. 9 to 9 - Daily 9 to 6 
Closed Mondays 

SCHULTZ, DOYLE & STODDARD INC. 

624 Hancock St. 472-4800 

SOUTH SHORE NATIONAL BANK 

Clay i Chapman Sts. 471-0361 
Open Friday Till 7:30 

WOLLASTON CREDIT UNION 

651 Hancock St. 773-3500 
Open Mon. <t Thurs. Till 8 



"Protection That Never Sleeps" 
BERRY INSURANCE AGENCY INC. 

General Insurance 

Brokers 

All Types Of Insurance 

671 HANCOCK ST, QUINCY 479-5500 



WOLLASTON DONUT SHOPPE 

17 Beale St. 479-1806 
Open 6 to 6 Daily 

WOLLASTON MUSIC and HOBBY SHOP 

27 Beale St. 773-5325 

Open Daily Till 5:30, Mon. & Tues. Till 8 

Officers and Directors of the Wollaston Business 

and Professional Association 
President: Irving Boyes - Schultz. Doyle & Stoddard Inc. 

Sec'y-Treas: Bernice R. King - N. J. Riggs & Son 

Recording Sec'y: E. Sarto Minihan - Ret. - Affial. So. Shore Nat'l Bank 
Directors: Daniel R. Barry - Barry's Deli 

Henry G. Berry - Berry's Ins. Agcy Inc. 

Frank Crotty - General Business Services 

A. L. Hallberg - Purity Supreme 

Jack Lyrfbn - Lydon-Russell Funeral Home 

Elden Meady - Harmon Plumbing 

Ronald 1M€lls«n - South :Shore National Bank 
Harold Robbins - Bobbins Garage 



Page 16 Quincy Sun Wednesday, July 3, 1974 




Joseph W. Lind, 66, of 111 
Willow St., at Jordan Hospital, 
Plymouth, June 26. 

Louis F. Deschaine, 59, of 
111 Sumner St., unexpectedly at 
his home, June 24. 

Earl A. Kettlety, 85, of 167 
Nursery Road, Falmouth, 
formerly of Quincy, at 
Falmouth Hospital, June 26, 

Roger L. Lermond. 60, of 15 
Clapp Ave., Weymouth, 
formerly of Quincy, 
unexpectedly at his home, June 
26. 

Mrs. Barbara (Joyce/ Lyons, 
84, of 24 Grossman St., at 
Quincy City Hospital, June 24. 

Vincenzo Penella, 85, of 120 
Russell St., at Quincy City 
Hospital, June 25. 

Dennis D. Conley, 67, of 92 
Havihmd St., at University 
Hospital, Boston, June 24. 

Clark C. Campbell, 61, of 206 
Taffrail Road, at Beth Israel 
Hospital, Boston, June 25. 

Mrs. C. Mae /Gillis/ Kimball, 
78, of 20 Pond St., Braintree, 
formerly of Quincy, at Quincy 
City Hospital, June 25. 

Mrs. Ruth [Starr] Woolf^on, 
80, of 336 Granite Ave., at a 
Weymouth nursing home, June 
24. 

Thomas U. Kantola, 77, of 3 
Cottage Ave., at the Norfolk 
County Hospital, June 27. 



Arthur G. Rooney, 51, of 132 
Sagamore St., unexpectedly at 
home, June 28. 

Mrs. Louise H. /ButterfieldJ 
Read, 73, of 54 Sea Extension, 
Hyannis, formerly of Quincy, at 
the Cape Cod Hospital, June 28. 
Mrs. Anne M. [Magennityj 
Spinney, 74, of 190 Everett St., 
at a Quincy nursing home, June 
29. 

Lawrence Ulvila, 68, of 93 
Billings St., at the Quincy 
Nursing Home, June 29. 

Mrs. Elvira fMinichielloJ 
Kowalski, 74, of 322 Elmwood 
Ave., at Massachusetts General 
Hospital, Boston, June 29. 

Charles R. Conley, 78, of 22 
Edgi'mere Rd, ut a Quincy 
nursing home, June 29. 

John J. Casey, 65, of 287 
Edge Hill Road, Milton, 
formerly of Quincy, ut a 
Mattapan nursing home, June 
29. 

Mrs. Katherine E. /Prescott/ 
Acker, 85, of 18 Farm Road, 
Braintree, formerly of Quincy, 
at the Quincy City Hospital, 
June 29. 

Mrs. Persethony 
fPolochroniadouJ Calimeris, 83, 
of 243 Quincy Shore Dr., at the 
Carney Hospital, June 29. 

Leonard Palmisano, 73, of 49 
Mt. Ararat Road, at Quincy City 
Hospital, June 29. 



HANCOCK MONUMENT CO. 

JOHN RICCIUTI & SONS. INC. 
295 HANCOCK ST.. OPP. NO. QUINCY HIGH SCHOOL 

BEST DOMESTIC AND 
IMPORTED GRANITE 
VISIT OUR LARGE AND 
COMPLETE DISPLAY 
MONUMENTS FROM $195 * UP 
328-4437 472-3447 

* Cemetery Charge and Sales Tax Extra 




■ National Selected Morticians isn't just 
another association. NSM is a network of 
leading independent funeral directors in 
more than 850 cities 
who work together 
to set new standards 
of responsi- 



^ _ , _,,_ ^^^ _,,_ "-»^<«Miib 



why we 
were (i 

invited 
to joii 



\ 




bility in 

funeral 

service 

so they 

can serve 

their respective 

communities better. 

Membership in NSM 

is granted only after 

careful scrutiny of each firm's quality of 

service and record of performance. Our 

affiliation with NSM means that we 

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membership, it is the finest 

recommendation 

we can have. 

You can count on it. 

KEOHANE FUNERAL HOME 




333 Hancock St. 



785 Hancock St. 



773-3551 



Awards Presented At 
St. Mary's School Graduation 



Daniel J. Jurusz, Mary E. 
Flaherty and Carol Anne Byrne 
captured the highest honors at 
recent graduation exercises at St. 
Mary's School, West Quincy. 

Jurusz won a full four-year 
scholarship to Boston College 
High School and a Scholastic 
Achievement Placque for 
outstanding achievement in 
various fields and excellence in 
the entrance exams. 

Misses Flaherty and Byrne 
won full four-year scholarships 
to Fontbonne Academy and 
Scholastic Achievement Placques 
for outstanding achievement and 
excellence in the entrance 
exams. 

Other award winners were: 
Paul J. Flaherty, the St. 
Mary's Guild Grant of $150 for 
Boston College High School; 
Peter C. Plant, the Holy Name 
Grant of $150 for Archbishop 
Williams High School; Mary 
Ellen Riordan, the St. Mary's 
Guild Grant of $150 for Sacred 
Heart High School, Weymouth. 
Catriona M. McGregor, the 
Holy Name Grant of $150 for 
Sacred Heart High School; John 
F. Lewis, the Ave Maria Council 
Grant of $150 by the Knights of 
Columbus for Don Bosco 
Technical High School; Daniel J. 
Jurusz, an honor certificate from 
Catholic Memorial High School 
for excellence in oratory. 



Local art fair blue ribbons 
were awarded to Sheila M. 
McDonald, Patricia G. Gomez, 
Carol Anne Byrne, Mark E. 
Kelly and Margaret E. Kelly. 

Diocesan art fair awards were 
made to Sheila M. McDonald 
and Patricia G. Gomez, first 
prizes; Carol Anne Byrne, 
second prize; and Mark E. Kelly', 
honorable mention. 

Local science fair awards went 
to Stephen C. Blaser, Daniel J. 
Jurusz and Peter C. Plant, first 
prizes; Patricia G. Gomez and 
Margaret E. Kelly, second prizes; 
Paul J. Flaherty, George lavicoli 
and Patrick J. Vallier, third 
prizes; Mark E. Kelly, John F. 
Lewis and John F. Kilcommons, 
honorable mentions. 

St. Mary's Oratory gold 
ribbons were presented to 
Catriona M. McGregor. Maureen 
A. Little, Mary Ellen Riordan, 
Eleanor C. Vallier, Elizabeth J. 
Nimcskern, Scott R. Gosselin, 
John F. Lewis, Maureen E. 
Leahy, Daniel J. Jurusz, and 
John F. Kilcommons. 

Certificates of Recognition in 
an essay contest sponsored by 
the National Conference of 
Christians and Jews went to: 

Mary Ellen Riordan, Cheryl 
Ann Pitts, John F. Lewis, Daniel 
J. Jurusz, Anne Marie Cattaneo, 
Janet Zero, Patricia G. Gomez, 
Patti Ann Hunt, Mark E. Kelly, 



Robert E. Prewitt, George 
lavicoli, Robert S. Panico. 

Sheila A. McDonald, Terrence 
P. Cahalane, Maureen E. Leahy, 
Peter C. Plant, Mary E. Flaherty, 
John J. Conley, Carol Anne 
Byrne, David T. Mariano, 
Maureen A. Little, Margaret E. 
Kelly, John F. Kilcommons. 

The 33 members of the 
graduating class were: 

Sheila M. McDonald, Patricia 
G. Gomez, Janet Zero, Cheryl 
Anne Pitts, Anne M. Cattaneo, 
Patti Ann Hunt, Mary E. 
Flaherty, Maureen E. Leahy, 
Eleanor C. Vallier, Catriona M. 
McGregor, Maureen A. Little, 
Beth J. Nimeskern, Jean F. 
Raymond, Margaret E. Kelly, 
Mary Ellen Riordan, Carol Anne 
Byrne. 

Paul J. Flaherty Jr., Robert S. 
Panico, Scott R. Gosselin, Daniel 
J. Jurusz, Peter C. Plant, 
Stephen C. Blaser, Terrence P. 
Cahalane, John F. Lewis, George 
lavicoli, Roger E. Prewitt, 
Robert E. Prewitt, Mark E. 
Kelly, Frederick B. Immar, 
David T. Mariano, Patrick J. 
Vallier, John F. Kilcommons, 
John J. Conley. 

The graduates assisted at a 
Mass concelebrated by Fr. John 
J. McMahon and Fr. James 
Lanergan. Msgr. John Mullarkey 
and Fr. Joseph Valenti, S.J., 
were in attendance. 



Edward Keohane Elected 
N.Q. Council Grand Knight 



Knii^ts of Columbus, North 
Quincy Council, have elected 
new officers for the coming 
year. They are: 

Edward J. Keohane, Grand 
Knight; Nicholas W. Fasano, 
Deputy Grand Knight; John J. 
Lydon Jr., chancellor, Kenneth 
Runge, warden; Thomas F. 
Holmes, inside guard; Steven A. 



Connolly, recorder; Donald 
Haley, financial secretary; John 
Crowley, treasurer; Gerald J. 
Connor, advocate. 

James MuUaney, three-year 
trustee; Maurice Dunn, delegate 
to State convention; Francis X. 
Dorney, alternate delegate; 
Angelo M. Ciccolo, Boston 



Chapter; Francis X. Domcy, 
Arthur Keefe, Fred Lutfy, 
Steven Richmond and John J. 
Sullivan Sr., three-year directors 
of Building Association; and 
Charies Doherty, two-year 
director of Building Association. 

The Council's next meeting is 
Aug. 6. 



'God^ Lesson-Sermon Topic At Christian Science 

"God" is the subject of Scriptural selecrions from and ye shall go and pray unto 

Sunday s Lesson-Sermon at First Jeremiah 6: 12-14 contain this me, and 1 will hearken unto you 
Church of Chnst, Scientist, 20 promise: And ye shall seek me, and find 

Greenleaf St., Quincy. "jhen shall ye call upon me, me, when ye shall search for me 

with ail your heart. And I will be 
found of you, saith the Lord." 




WWS'^'**', ."' 




74 ELM STREET-QUINCY 



326 COPELAND STREET 
W. QUINCY 



Dlrectoi' 

M. JOSEPH SWEtNEY 
Telephone 773-2728 



Grimwood 

And 

Coletta 

Funeral Home 

Albert J. Coletta 

Director 

603 .^danis St. 

Quincy 

773-1046 




IE INVITE YOU io discuss freely and frankly w'ifh us 
questions you may have regarding any ai\d all aspecis of 
the funeral including our services and out fees. 
Funeral directors serve besi when such service is based 

on a mutual undersianding between them and those 
who seek their services. This should prevail during the 

arrangements for the funeral and until all the needs 
and desires of the survivors have been satisfied. 

A M*mb*r af a Slat* Auotiotien offiliottd wKh 

NATIONAL FUNERAL DIRECTORS ASSOCIATION 

The Funeral 1$ Testimony That A Life Hat B«en lived 

Wickens and Troupe 

FUNERAL HOME 

26 Adams Street-Qulncy 

Off Street Parking 472-5888 



ROY'S 
FLOWERS 

94 WASHINGTON ST 

Qumcr 

MAJOR CREDIT 
CARDS ACCEPTED- 
BY PHONE 

472-1900, 




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Wednesday, July 3, 1974 Quincy Sun Page 17 




QUINCY YMCA AQUATHON swimmers 14-year-old Jean Finlay and her sister Irene, take to the water 
in around-the-clock swimming marathon at the Y pool to raise funds for YMCA youth programs, 
scholarships, and to support its World Service Program. Seated are Debbie Hovey, Joan Joyce, Cathy 
Riley and Ted Goodenough. 

[Quincy Sun Photo by Laban Whittaker] 

City's 31 Playgrounds Open 



The Quincy Recreation 
Department's 3 1 playgrounds 
are open for an eight week 
period during July and August. 
Director William F. Ryan said 
each playground will be staffed 
with two leaders, from 9 a.m. to 
4 p.m., Mondays through 
Fridays, and each will offer a 
wide range of activities, 
including leagues of baseball, 
basketball, softball, trips, family 
evenings, special events, games, 
and other sports. 

In addition' to the regular 
playground leaders, playground 



specialists will visit each area on 
regular weekly schedules, 
offering instruction in golf, 
archery, tennis, nature study, 
arts and crafts, music, drama and 
dance. City-wide tournaments, 
performances and -exhibits 
climax each of these activities. 

Playground registration is at 
the following locations: 

Ward 1 - Faxon Field, behind 
the Voc Tech School, Whitwell, 
Baker, Bayside, Harborview, 
LaBrecque, Quarterdeck, Snug 
Harbor, Heron Rd and Perkins. 



Ward 2 - Elm St., Fore River, 
Pollard, Pond St., Faxon Park 
and Bradford. 

Ward 3 - Forbes Hill, Stoney 
Brae, Wollaston and Montclair. 

Ward 4 - Shea Rink [Curry 
Field) , O'Rourke, Columbia and 
Kincaide. ; 



Mass Fields, 
Knoll and 



Ward 5 
Beechwood 
Merrymount. 

Ward 6 - Myles Standish, 
Atlantic, Squantum and 
Welcome Young on Sagamore 
St. 



Quincy Tracit Club 
Off To Good Start 



It looks like an interesting 
summer of track in Quincy. 

The Quincy Track Club made 
its official debut last week with 
the first of several weekly meets 
at Veterans Memorial Stadium 
and the turnout and the 
competition were heartening to 
the officials. 

Several Quincy boys and girls 
had been appearing unofficially 
under the Track Club colors in 
meets at Braintree, Brockton 
and Falmouth, and had made 
excellent showings. 

More than 20 events were run 
on the opening card and 
competition was keen. 



Winners in the giris' 100-yard 
dash were Michelle Riggs in the 
9-1 1 year old class, Karen 
Candlaft, 12-15, and Roberta 
Mahn, open. 

Boys' 110-yard dash winners 
were Jack Brown, 9-1 1 years of 
age; Doron Ezickson, 12-15, and 
Lee Watkins, open. 

Giris' 440: Nancy McCarthy, 
9-11; Pat Micelli, 12-15. 

Boys' 440: Pat King, 9-11; 
Doron Ezickson, 12-15, and 
Dave DiBona, open. 

Boys' 880: Don Jones, 12-15 
and Tex Vanasso, open. 

Boys' open two-mile: Bart 
Petracca. 



Boys' lung jump: Dave 
Church, 9-1 1 ; Brian Djerf, 12-15 
and John Johnson, open. 

Girls' 12-15 long jump: Rory 
Nolan. 

Boys's shot put: Harry 
Knudson, 12-15 and Paul 
Doherty, open. 

Men's Discus: Dave Popsie. 

Boys' relay: Andy Levitsky, 
Steve Donovan, Dave Church 
and Jack Brown, 9-1 1. 

Boys' open relay: Bob 
McCormack, Lee Watkins, Tex 
Varrasso and Dave DiBona. 

Giris' 12-15 relay: Patty 
Miceli, Gera Foy, Paula Church 
and Ann Sullivan. 



Special Interest Courses Registration At Y 



Registrations are being 
accepted at the Quincy YMCA 
for several Special Interest 
Courses offered to members and 
non-members this summer. 

Pre-registration is required as 
enrollments are limited. The 
courses are: 

Co-ed Adults and High School 
Youth: 

Pottery, Thursdays, 7 - 9 
p.m., July 1 1 - Aug. 15, 6 
lessons. 

Golf, Thursday, 7-8:15 p.m. 
July 1 ] - Aug. 22, 7 lessons. 

Scuba, Fridays, 6 - 8 p.m. 
June 28 - Sept. 6, 1 1 weeks. 

For Women and High School 
Girls: 

Belly Dancing and Ballet, 
Mondays, 6:30 - 7:30 p.m. July 
8 - Aug. 19, 7 lessons. 

Yoga, Wednesdays, 7:30 - 
.8:30 p.m. July 10 - Aug. 21. 7 
lessons. 

For further ii»formation for 
all courses, except Scuba, 
contact the, Quincy YMCA, 
479-8500.- Fot' Scuba, call 
773-5452. 



INDOOR TENNIS 



FOR COURT) 

Econo Tennis, Inc. 

• WALPOLE 

• RANDOLPH 

• DANVERS 

"is Now Accepting Applications For 
Tennis This Fall 

• Featuring Low cost tennis in a 
modern indoor facility 

f Ple'xi-Cushion courts 
Direct lighting system 

• ■Showers, Sauna locker room 

• tounge and viewing area 

• Babysitting available 

CALL 784-8346 



RESERVE TIME NOW . . . 

SEASON STARTS SEPT. 15, 1974 




Awards Presented At 
NO Track Banquet 



The North Quincy High 
School spring and winter track 
teams and cross country team 
capped the season with an 
awards banquet last week at 
Vallee's in Braintree. 

A special guest was Ralph 
Colson, chairman of the New 
England AAU, who praised the 
athletes for their efforts and 
congratulated the spring track 
team for an outstanding season 
[11-41. 

Coach Lou Tozzi made several 
awards including Most Valuable 
presentations to Bart Petracca 



for cross country, Geoff 
Hennessey, winter track, and 
Paul Doherty, spring track. 

Artie Barrett received an 
Unsung Hero award for spring 
track and Chris Cordeiro for 
winter track. 

Red Raider awards went to 
Neil McPartlin for spring track 
and to Mark Canavan for winter 
track. 

Greater Boston League all-star 
certificates were presented to 
Petracca, Hennessey, McPartlin, 
Doherty, Barrett, Canavan and 
John Flynn. 



Spring Basketball 

Playoffs Open 
Monday At YMCA 



The Quincy YMCA Senior 
Spring Basketball League, 
enjoying one of its most 

successful seasons, will open its 
'playoffs Monday and th'e games 
are expected to be the most 
exciting in years. . 

The two top teams in each 
division will compete, the 
O'Brien Club and Goodless AC 

from Division One and Curran's 
Cafe and Caulfield 11 from 
Division Two. 

The standings (including last 
week's games] : 



DIVISION ONE 

W L 

O'Brien Club ,,-.12 

Goodless AC .'.10 2 

Hot Shots ' '7 5 
Kings Club ««..*.-5 ~N-*=7 

Hackers 5 7 

Hatchetmen 5t"i<-4; • 8 

Hustlers 1 11 

DIVISION TWO 

W L 

Curran's Cafe '^'' \\ 1 

Caulfield II ,- 11 1 

Hounds 8 4 

The Mount 7 5 

Quincy YMCA - 5 7 

C&S 4 8 

Silver Lake 2 1 

Buckeyes 1 2 









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BOATING 

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TENNIS 

* 8 IncJoor courts 

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surfoces & lighting 

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542 EAST SQUANTUM STREET, QUINCY, MASS. 



Page 18 Quincy Sun Wednesday, July 3, 1974 

• Senior Babe Ruth 

Quincy Bows 
To Milton, 4-0 



The Quincy Senior Babe Ruth 
League team, Data Services, 
dropped a 4-0 decision to Milton 
Sunday when Milton scored 
three runs in the fifth inning to 
wrap things up. 

Quincy, which is having a 
good year in the South Shore 
League, was held to three hits as 
it suffered its first shutout of the 
season. 

Last week Quincy out-slugged 
South Boston One, 10-9, with 



SOUTH SHORE 



SKINDIVER 




Complete 
Diving 
Center 



511 WASHINGTON ST. 
773-5452 



two runs in the sixth inning. 

Southie had exploded for six 
runs in the third inning for a 9-4 
lead but strong relief pitching by 
Gerry Gavin halted South 
Boston and his mates scored 
three in the fourth, one in the 
fifth and won it with the two in 
tlie sixth. 

Gavin allowed only two hits 
in 4 2/3 innings. Paul Messina 
was three for three including a 
double, drove in a run with a 
long sacrifice fly, scored a run 
and stole a base. Dave Power was 
three for four and scored three 
runs and Spike Cooney also 
scored three mns. 

Earlier in the week Quincy 
avenged an earlier defeat by 
defeating Randolph, 5-1, behind 
the four-hit pitching of Gerry 
Bugden. In the first game of the 
year Randolph had erupted for 
19 runs against Quincy. Bugden 
also sparked the attack with a 
triple and single while Paul 
Coner and Nick Anastas had 
doubles. 



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PIN CHAMPS - Montclair Men's Club, champions of the Quincy Bowling Little Loop, receive their 
trophies from former Red Sox star Mike Andrews during awards night ceremonies Monday [May 6] . 
Left to right. Loop President Joe Gildea, Andrews, Jim Locke, president of Montclair Men's Club; Bill 
Vey, James Adams, John Gullins, Nick Anastas, Bill Connor. 

•Babe Ruth League 

Firefighters Win 3, Police 2 



The .Police Club won two 
Babe Ruth League games during 
the past week, defeating Gino's, 
16-2, and edging Morrisette Post, 
6-5. 

Against Gino's, Ronny 
Donovan was the winning 
pitcher. Chuck LoPresti had two 
hits including a home run, John 
Ferris, Brian Connolly, Ed 
Laracy, Mike Murphy and Rich 
Boyle each had two hits and 
John Andrews a double. 

LoPresti was the winning 
pitcher against Morrisette and 
struck out 11. Donovan, Boyle, 



LoPresti and Murphy each had 
two hits and Lou Fishman and 
Andrews had other hits. John 
Silva had two for Morrisette. 

Morrisette defeated Burger 
King, 14-9, with Brian Harding 
the winning pitcher. Brian Djerf, 
Tom Cahill, Brian Reidy had 
two hits each, Mark Forrester 
had a double and Jimmy 
Hanrahan a single. Mike Nee 
sparkled defensively. 

Houghs Neck defeated VFW, 
8-5, with Art Davis pitching, and 
Gino's topped Sons of Italy on 
Paul Barry's four-hitter. 



Firemen continued their 
winning ways with three more 
wins and lead the American 
League with a 9-3 record. 

The Firemen nipped Sons of 
Italy, 3-2, with Bud Daley 
pitching a three-hitter and 
striking out eight. Both teams 
played fine defensive ball with 
Firemen's Tom Wilkinson 
making several outstanding plays 
at shortstop. They followed with 
a 6-3 win over Burger King as Sal 
Coscia allowed only four hits 
and struck out eight, and they 
blanked Bersani Brothers, 5-0, as 
Daley pitched a no-hitter. 



Babe Ruth National All-Stars In Tourney 



The Quincy Babe Ruth 
National League All-Stars will 
open state tournament play 
tomorrow [Thursday] at Kelly 
Field in Milton at 2 p.m. 

If Quincy wins on the holiday 
it will continue tournament 
competition at Adams Field in 
Quincy Saturday. 

The all-stars are coached by 
Dick Laracy of the Police Boys 
Club, assisted by Ed Hutchins of 
Hancock Bank and Jack Kelly of 
Morrisette Post. 

The roster: 

Lou Fishman, Chuckle 



LoPresti, John Ferris, Mike 
Murphy and John Andrews, 
Police Club; Paul Bowen, Matty 
King and. Mike McCormack, 
Hancock Bank; Brian Kelly and 
Brian Ready, Morrisette Post; 



Dave Rafferty, Bob Stack and 
Steve Bowen, brother of Paul, 
Granite City Electric; Jim 
McGinley and Frank Cangemi, 
Sons of Italy. Bat boys are Peter 
Murphy and Bobby Laracy. 



Mulroy, McPeck Win 
May Bowl At FB 



The women of Furnace Brook 
Golf Club completed the May 
Bowl with EUie Mulroy and 
Helene McPeck defeating Mimi 



COOL OFF 

INDOORS FOR THE SUMMER AT 

COHASSET WINTER GARDEN 

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PUBLIC SKATING 

with 
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Wednesday and Sunday Nites 

8 P.M. -10 P.M. 

ADMISSION $1.50 



SUMMER 

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Monday Nites 
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MANY OF THESE COUEGE STARS 

WIU BE PLAYING IN THE N.H.L 

FAST COIUEGE HOCKEY 

CHILDREN 12 AND UNDER 




$1.00 



DeFederico and Eileen Clifford. 

In the consolation Florence 
Eramo and Barbara Spinello 
defeated Edna Phelps and Rena 
Roche. 

In Class A of the first round 
of the Directors Cup, Mary 
Morrissey defeated Mimi 
DeFederico, Mel Corbin 
defeated Florence Eramo, 
Jeanne Doherty defeated Rena 
Roche and Joyce Robbins won 
by default over Priscilla O-'Neill. 

In Class B Claire Walsh 
defeated Rena Hodges, Joy 
Robbins defeated Eileen 
Clifford, Pat Cugini defeated 
Dot Smith and Helene McPeck 
defeated Eda Flote. 



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• Squirt House 

Murphy Scores 5 
In Team 1, 11-0 



Wednesday, July 3, 1974 Quincy Sun Page 19 



Tommy Murphy had five 
goals as Team 1 exploded for an 
11-0 win over Team 4 in the 
Squirt House League. Ricky 
Miller had two goals and Kevin 
Craig, Kevm Chase, Billy Curran 
and Mike Marshall one each. 
Craig had five assists, Chase, 
Marshall, Rich O'Cullivan, Mike 
Chennette and Joey Engrassia 
two each and Murphy and 
Curran one apiece. 

Team 5 nipped Team 2, 2-1, 
on goals by Mike Sullivan and 
Dick Mahoney and excellent 
goal tending by Tommy Corliss. 



Paul McCabe scored for Team 2 
with assists for John O'Connell 
and Rich Milano. 

Team 6 edged Team 3, 5-4, 
with Dennis Burtado having the 
hal trick and Rosendo Castilla 
and John Burm one goal each 
for Team 6, Furtado also had 
two assists, Dave MacMurdo and 
Burm one each. For Team 3 
Frankie Raynolds, Kevin Duff, 
Jim Kustka and Chris Gorman 
had the goals and Teddy Walsh 
had two assists, Mike Connally, 
Kevin White and Reynolds one 
each. 



•Pee Wee House 

Boussy's Hat Trick 
Sparks Team 5 



Team 5 rolled over Team 2, 
9-1, in the Pee Wee House 
League, as Mark Boussy had the 
hat trick, Dick McCarthy two 
goals, Mark Veasey, Tommy 
Mullen, John Lyons and Bob 
Larsen once each. 

Boussy, Mullen and Freddie 
Palmer each had two assists, 
Lyons and Bob Currier one each. 
For Team 2 Dick Tyan scored 
and Tom McHugh and Bill 
Doran had assists. 

Team 6 defeated Team 3, 6-4, 



with Steve Walsh scoring twice, 
Mike Doherty, Bobby Bolster, 
Bob Beniers and Jim Paolucci 
once each. Walsh and Doherty 
had two assists apiece, Beniers 
and Mike Nevins one each. 
Robbie Craig had two goals for 
Team 3 and Robbie Zanardelli 
and John Toland one each and 
Zanardelli had three assists, 
Craig two and John Coleman 
and Toland one each. 

Team 1 romped over Team 4, 
11-3. 



tMite House 

Kelly Scores 4 
As Team 4 Wins 



In the Mite House League 
Team 4 defeated Team 1, 5-2. 

Danny Kelly scored four goals 
and Sean Laughman one for the 
winners with assists for Jeff 
Murphy and Pete Quinn. Steve 
White and Bobby McCabe scored 
the Team 1 goals. 

Team 2 topped Team 5, 7-4, 
with Mark Chambers scoring 
four goals and Brian Chase three 
for Team 2. Chase also had three 

MUSIAL'S RECORD 

On May 13, 1958, Stan Mu- 
sial of St. liouis Cardinals 
joined .seven other players in 
baseball history in scoring his 
3,000th major league hit. 



assists and Jim Daly one. For 
Team 5, Scott Messina had all 
four goals with assists for Ray 
Paul Welliver and Brian Spring. 
Team 6 edged Team 3, 4-3, 
with Jimmy Milano having the 
hat trick and Paul Marshall the 
other goal for the winners. Chris 
Hurley had two goals and Jimmy 
Crossman one for Team 3, while 
Billy Hughes had two assists and 
Ed Fleming one. 

MOTORCYCLE FIRST 

On May 16, 1903, George A. 
Wyman of San Francisco be- 
came the first person to try to 
cross the United States by 
motorcycle; he arrived in 
New York two months later. 




THE GOLD TEAM was runnerup in the Quincy Youth Hockey Association Girls' League. Front, left to 
right, Debbie McManus, Joan McManus, Tracy Bowe, Ginny Weeks, Donna Wynn, Kathy Hussey and 
Barbara Wynn. Back, Coach Paul Hussey, Mary Ellen Riordan, Linda Fitzgerald, Jayne Prasinos, Paula 
Contas, Jean Kelly, Maureen Santry and Coach Regina Hussey. 

• Senior Summer League 

Clovers Win Protested 

The Quincy Clovers won their 
second straight Senior Summer 
Hockey League game last week 
at the Quincy Youth Arena but 
their 5-3 decision over the 
Atlantic Flames was protested. 

"I protested the game because 
of what 1 felt Was an illegal goal 
which cost us the game," said 
Flames Coach Barry Blesedell. 

"On the third Quincy goal, 
Fred Ahern came out bf the 
corner with the puck and 
attempted to backhand it into 
the net. The goalie made the 
save. In the process of shooting, 
Ahern fell on the goalie, pinning 
him in the crease. 

"Another Quincy player shot 
the puck into the net and referee 
Mike O'Connell called it a goal. 
NHL rules clearly state that a 
player in the crease nullifies a 
goal." 

• Bantam House 



W L T Pts.CJF GA 
Boston 

Budmen 3 6 17 10 
Quincy 

Clovers 2 10 4 13 1 J 
Newman 

Club 1 1 1 3 16 15 
Whitman 

Cats 111 3 14 12 
Atlantic 

Flames 12 2 12 14 
Walpole 

Chiefs 3 9 18 



O'Connell explained he 
allowed the goal because "the 
player [Ahern] was pushed by a 
defensive player into the goalie 
and also the offensive player had 
left the crease when the goal was 
scored." 

Larry Fitzgerald put Quincy 
ahead, 2-0, at 12:09 of the first 
period with P. J. Flaherty 
assisting. At 14: 16 John Cunniff 



made it 2-0 with an unassisted 
goal. 

Atlantic tied it with two goals 
in the second period but Quincy 
quickly regained the lead at 2:21 
of the third period on Ahern's 
disputed goal and Frankie Guest 
scored the winning goal at 4:54 
with Tim Morrill assisting. After 
an Atlantic goal, Morrill scored 
the insurance goal at 19:41 with 
Cunniff assisting. 

Charlie Rheault was 
outstanding m Quincy's goal 
with 40 saves, seven in the first, 
13 in the second and 20 in the 
final session as Atlantic put on 
the pressure. 

Boston Budmen remained in 
first place with a 3-0 record as 
they defeated the Newman Club, 
7-4, and Whitman Cats gained 
their first win, 5-3, over the 
Walpole Chiefs. 



Teams 5, 2 In Tie 



Team 5 and Te 
a 4-4 tie in the 
League. 

Louis Mathews 
for Team 5, Mike 
John Norton one 
assists for Eddie 
each by Brian 
Coleman, Russ 
John Kelley. For 
Sullivan had two 



am 2 played to 
Bantam House 

had two goals 
Van Tassel and 
each with two 
Kane and one 
Norton, Ray 
DiPietro and 
Team 2 Danny 
goals and Bob 



Collins and John Kelley one 
each. Mike Pitts had three 
assists, Kelley two, Mike Bennett 
and Bud Wells one each. 

Team 1 topped Team 4, 5-2, 
with Mike Bonaarick and Dave 
Lewis having two goals each and 
Jim Crossen one. Danny Gorman 
and Bud Richardson had assists. 
Kevin McGrath and John Cotter 
scored for -Team 4 and Cotter 



and John Rafferty had assists. 

Team 6 defeated Team 3, 5-1, 
with Billy Allen having the hat 
trick and Bryan McGilvray and 
Bobby Hayes scoring once each. 
Steve Whittemore had three 
assists, Jim McHugli and Billy 
Deitsch two each, Hayes, Mike 
Walsh, Danny Higgins and John 
MoUoy one each. 




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Page 20 Quincy Sun Wednesday, July 3, 1974 

•Around The Buoys 

Perez, Durkin 
At SYC 



By JAMES COLLINS 

Light air and a sea fog caused 
an abbreviated race course of the 
Squantum Yach Club on 
Saturday. 

In the Flying Scot class over a 
J.J mile windward - leev/ard 
course the Brandy skippered by 
Gabe Perez was the first home 
followed by Jim Beaton's 
"Dream Awhile". 

The Turnabout Class sailed 
over a 2.5 mile windward-lee- 
ward purse with Margaret 
Durkin's No. 1558 claiming the 
winning spot. 



The summary: 

Brandy, Gabe Perez, 1-10-16. 

Dream Awhile, Jim Beaton, 
1-10-24. 

No. 414, David Gwynn, 
1-11-00. 

Other finishers: No. 421, No 
Name; No. 2422, Bob 
Montgomery; No. 133 1, P. 
Ottobrini; and No. 2454, Earl 
Sunderland. 

Turnabout Class: 

No. 1558, Margaret Durkin, 
0-39-25. 

No. 1433, Nick Ranzalli, 
0-39-27. 

No. 773, Sandy Stover, 
0-39-29. 



Quincy Wins 5-3, 17-6 



Quincy got good all around 
hitting and solid pitching from 
Paul Craig and John Earle last 
week in sweeping a pair of Zone 
6 Legion baseball games from 
Hingham, 5-3, and Wollaston, 
17-6. 

Craig allowed five hits and 
fanned eight in beating 
Hingham. He also banged in two 
runs with a triple and scored a 
third on Paul Sutherland's single 



in Quincy 's big three-run fourth. 

Quincy scored six runs in the 
first inning on singles by 
Sutherland, Frank DiSalvio and 
Bill Berberan, three walks and 
two wild pitches to touch off 
the one-sided victory over 
Wollaston. 

Dave Sten pitched to the first 
four Wollaston batters, then 
retired in favor of Earle, who 
went the rest of the way. 



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• Junior Baseball 



HN, VFW Each Rack Up Pair 



Houghs Neck and VFW each 
won two Quincy Junior Baseball 
League games during the past 
week to move up in the 
standings. 

Houghs Neck defeated Burgin 
Platner, 6-1, behind the strong 
pitching of Jeff Giordani. Mike 
Abboud and Tom McFarland 
had doubles and Greg Oriola, 
Giordani, Abboud, Kevin 
McKinnon, Frank McPartland 
and Matt Kenny had singles. 
Tom O'Connor started at second 
base and played an outstanding 
game. Joe Phelan finished up at 
second. 

Houghs Neck also topped 
Elks, 14-5, with Abboud and 
Oriola sharing the pitching 
duties. Steve Notorangelo, 
McKinnon and Abboud had 



AMERICAN LEAGUE 
W L 



Sears 

Houghs Neck 
Boston Gear 
Foley Chrysler 
Burgin Platner 
Remick's 



12 

12 

8 

6 

c 
J 



3 
5 
8 
9 



1 16 



NATIONAL LEAGUE 



W 



Kiwanis 


12 


4 


Keohane's 


12 


5 


VFW 


10 


5 


Rotary 


9 


7 


Colonial Federal 


7 


9 


Elks 


3 


14 



doubles and Oriola, Giordani, 
Kenny and Bob Cronin singles. 
Marty McLaughlin excelled at 
third base. 

VFW blanked Elks, 7-0, with 
Gordon Spencer starring on the 
mound and Jim Sullivan 
catching. Paul O'Toole had a 
double and two singles, Sullivan 
two singles and Danny Boyle a 
single. 

VFW also defeated Keohane's, 
4-1, with O'Toole pitching a 
one-hitter and striking out 13. 
Tom Roche had a double and 
two singles, O'Toole, Boyle, 
Sullivan and Spencer a single 
each. For Keohane's Brian Reale 
had the only hit and made an 
outstanding diving catch at 
second base. 



Quincy Softball 

Marcel Wins 3 Straight 
Shutouts To Take Lead 



Marcel Corp. won three 
successive shutouts during the 
past week to move into first 
place in the Quincy Softball 
League's American League West. 

Marcel started the streak by 
clobbering Alumni, 23-0, playing 
errorless ball. It edged Barry 's 
Ship Haven, 2-0, with Ed Cahill 
pitching a strong game and 
lolled over Bill's Texaco, 21-0. 



with Ray Connerty going five 
for five including a home run. 
Bill Plant pitched one-hit ball. 

Sabina's kept winning with a 
14-3 breeze over Berry 
I nsurance. Tim Flynn and Paul 

Jay sparked the attack. Flynn 
was four four, including a home 
run and drove in four runs, while 
Jay had three hits. 

A & T Movers broke out of a 



batting slump with a 
come-fro m-behind 14-9 win over 
Dee Dee's. A & T trailed at one 
time, 9-3, thanks mainly to Fran 
Lacy's clutch triple, but A & T 
bounced back led by the big bats 
of Bill Osborne and Ken 
McPhee. A & T then defeated 
Wells Grille, 12-5, despite two 
home runs over the left field 
fence at Rotary Field by Garry 
McGrath. 



Elks Present Memorial Football 
To Mrs. Edward Densmore 



Harry Sarfaty, first 
vice-president of the 
Massachusetts Elks Association, 
presented a souvenir football. 



engraved in memory of the late 
Edward A. Densmore of Quincy, 
to his widow, Mrs. Grace 
Densmore, at her home at 28 



Wollaston, 






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EASY PARKING.. ..Enter Via 1564 Hancock St. or J. Hancock Parking A^ea 
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Wollaston Ave., 
Monday night. 

Densmore was a Past Exalted 
Ruler of Quincy Flks Lodge, a 
past district deputy for ten Elks 
Lodges in the area, was very 
active in services to the Elks' 
hospitalized veterans program, 
and was a strong supporter of all 
Elks' charitable and benevolent 
programs, one of which was the 
annual Elks' Charity Football 
Game, to which were invited 
each year as guests of the Elks, a 
large number of hospitalized 
veterans. 

Attending the presentation 
ceremonies were Quincy Lodge 
Exalted Ruier John J. Gorman, 
Representative Joseph E. Brett, 
a past exalted ruler, past district 
deputy, and past state president 
of the Elks; and Thomas M. 
Garrity of Braintree, Quincy 
Lodge representative in charge 
of veterans' services at the 
Jamaica Plain VA Hospital. 



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Wednesday, July 3, 1974 Quincy Sun Page 21 



New South Shore Summer 
Players Open In August 



L^GAL NOtJCE 



Hi 



LEGAL NOTICES 



South Shore Summer Players 
[SSSP], a new theatrical 
organization in Quincy, invites 
the public to participate in its 
first, kick-off production, to be 
scheduled in August. 

Paul J. Goslin, the club's 
clerk-secretary, calls SSSP "a 
wide-open organization." He 
said, "We'd be glad and thankful 
to accept people." 

Other officers of SSSP are 
Kevin Veronneau, president; 
Joseph Smongeski, first 
vice-president; Paul 
Marcantonio, second 
vice-president; and Richard 
Meredith, treasurer. 

All of the officers are former 
students of North Quincy High 
School. They were members of 
the concert choir, band, and 
drama club, participating in such 
musicals as "The Roar of the 
Greasepaint", "The Smell of the 
Crowd", "The Music Man" and 
"Fiddler on the Roof. 

The officers are now 
continuing their training in the 
arts at Boston Conservatory of 
Music, Northeastern University, 

Swimming 

Class 
Schedule 

Quincy's Recreation 
Department announces the 
following schedule of swimming 
classes for this week. 

Tuesday July 9 - 3:25, 1-6, 
1:00, 1:30, 5:00, 5:30, 4:30, 
2:00, 2:30,4:00,3-4. 

Wednesday, July 10 - 4:07. 

1:30-6:30, 1:30, 2:00, 5:30, 

6:00, 5:00, l30, 3:00, 4:30, 
3:30-4:30. 

Thursday, July 11 - 4:52, 

2:30-7:30, -2:30, 3:00, 3:30, 

4:00, 7:00, 4:30, 5:00, 6:30, 
5:30-6:30. 

Friday, July 12 - 5:38, 

3:00-8:00, 3:00, 3:30, 4:00, 

4:30, 7:30, 6:30, 7:00, 6:00, 
5:00-6:00. 



University of Massachusetts and 
other institutions. 

SSSP has decided to produce 
"Dames at Sea", a spoof on the 
escapist movie musicals of the 
30's. The two leads are Ruby 
and Dick. Ruby is the 
starry-eyed girl from Utah who 
arrives in New York with hopes 
of becoming a Broadway star. 
But she only has a pair of 
tap-dancing shoes in her suitcase. 

Lucky, Joan, Mona Kent, 
Hennessy and Captain 
'Kewpie-doU" Courageous round 
out the rest of the cast. 

Dr. Lawrence Creedon, 
superintendent of Quincy Public 
Schools, has allowed the group 
to rehearse at Atlantic Junior 
High School throughout July 
and August. An organizational 
meeting at the school is planned 
for early July. Help is needed in 
all aspects of the production - 
stage crew, lighting, set design, 
advertising, and of course, 
acting, singing and dancing. 

LEGAL NOTICE "" 

COMMONWEALTH OF 
MASSACHUSETTS 

Norfolk, ss. Probate Court 

NO.74D0910 

To ROBERT J. EASTWOOD of 
2811 Fairpark Blvd. Little Rock, 
Arkansa. 

A libel has been presented to said 
Court by your wife JEANNETTE S. 
EASTWOOD praying that a divorce 
from the bond of matrimony 
between herself and you be decreed 
for the cause of cruel and abusive 
treatment. 

If you desire to object thereto, 
you or your attorney should file a 
written appearance in said Court at 
Dedham within twenty-one days 
from Aug. 7, 1974, the return day of 
this citation. 

Witness, ROBERT M. FORD, 
Esquire, First Judge of said Court, 
this June 28, 1974. 

PAUL C. GAY, 
Register. 
7/3-11-18/74 



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COMMONWEALTH OF 

MASSACHUSETTS 

Norfolk, ss. Probate Court 

No. 74D0882 

To WILLIAM D. O'LEARY of 

Parts Unknown. 

A libel has been presented to said 
Court by your wife ANN S. 
O'LEARY praying that a divorce 
from the bond of matrimony 
between herself and you be decreed 
for the cause of desertion and 
praying for alimony and for custody 
and allowance for minor children. 

If you desire to object thereto, 
you or your attorney should file a 
written appearance in said Court at 
Dedham within twenty-one days 
from Sept. 25, 1974, the return day 
of this citation. 

Witness, ROBERT M. FORD, 
Esquir*, First Judge of said Court, 
June 26, 1974. 

PAUL C. GAY, 
Register. 
7/3-11-18/74 



LOST PASSBOOK 

The following Passbook No. 92924 
has been lost, destroyed or stolen and 
application for payment has been 
made in accordance with Section 20, 
Chapter 167, General Laws. The 
finder will please return to the 
Granite Coop Bank, 120 Granite 
Street, Quincy. 
7/3-11/74 



COMMONWEALTH OF 
MASSACHUSETTS 

COUNTY OF NORFOLK 

PROPOSAL 

The Norfolk County 
Commissioners invite sealed bids for 
installation of security grills, 
emergency stairway, and vault at 
Quincy District Court which will be 
received at the office of the County 
Commissioners, Court House, 
Dedham, Massachusetts, until 12:00 
noon on Tuesday, July 9, 1974 at 
which time and place they will be 
publicly opened and read. 

Specifications may be obtained at 
the office of the County 

Commissioners, Court House, 
Dedham, Mass. 

The Commissioners reserve the 
right to accept or reject any or all 
bids; or to accept any bid or portion 
thereof deemed by them to be in the 
best interest of the County. 

All bids must be clearly marked on 
the outside "Bid for Security Grills, 
Emergency Stairway, and Vault for 
Quincy Court to be opened July 9 
1974." 

James J.Collins, Chmn. 

Thomas K. McManus 

George B. McDonald 

Norfolk County Commissioners 

7/3/74 




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LEGAL NOTICES 

COMMONWEALTH OF 

MASSACHUSETTS 

Norfolk, ss. Probate Court 

No. 199,332 

To all persons interested in the 
estate of CLYDI' W. IIASKINS late 
of Quincy in said County, deceased, 
testate. And to the Attorney General 
of said Commonwealth. 

A petition has been presented to 
said Court for license to sell at public 
auction - private sale - certain real 
estate situated in said Quincy of said 
deceased, in accordance with the 
offer as set forth in said petition. 

If you desire to object thereto you 
or your attorney should file a written 
appearance in said Court at Dedham 
before ten o'clock in the forenoon on 
July 17, 1974, the return day of this 
citation. 

Witness, ROBERT M. 1 ORD, 
I'squire, 1 irst Judge of said Court, 
this June 11, 1974. 

PAUL C, GAY, 
Register. 
6/20-27 7/3/74 

COMMONWEALTH OF- 
MASSACHUSETTS 

Norfolk, ss. Probate Court 

No. 191,193 

To ELMER L. STEVENS of 
Quincy in the County of Norfolk, a 
person under conservatorship, to his 
heirs apparent or presumptive and to 
the Massachusetts Department of 
Mental Health. And to the Attorney 
General of said Commonwealth. 

The conservator of the property of 
said ward has presented to said Court 
his second and final account for 
allowance. 

If you desire to object thereto you 
or your attorney should file a written 
appearance in said Court at Dedham 
before ten o'clock in the forenoon on 
July 17, 1974. the return day of this 
citation. 

Witness, ROBERT M. lORD, 
Esquire, first Judge of said Court, 
this June 11, 1974. 

PAUL C. GAY, 
Register. 
6/20-27 7/3/74 



COMMONWEALTH OF 
MASSACHUSETTS 

Norfolk, ss. Probate Court 

No. 74P1557 

To all persons interested in the 
estate of MARY T. VARVILLE late 
of Quincy in said County, deceased. 
And to the Attorney General of said 
Commonwealth, if required. 

A petition has been presented to 
said Court for probate of a certain 
instrument purporting to be the last 
will of said deceased by GE:0RGE 
PAUL VARVILLE of Quincy in the 
County of Norfolk praying that he be 
appointed executor thereof without 
giving a surety on his bond. 

If you desire to object thereto you 
or your attorney should file a written 
appearance in said Court at Dedham 
before ten o'clock in the forenoon on 
July 17, 1974, the return day of this 
citation. 

Witness, ROBERT M. FORD, 
Esquire, First Judge of said Court, 
this June 12, 1974. 

PAUL C. GAY, 
Register. 
6/20-27 7/3/74 

COMMONWEALTH OF 

MASSACHUSETTS 

Norfolk, ss. Probate Court 

No. 74P1594 

To all persons interested in the 
estate of MARY E. KANE 
CARROLL late of Quincy in said 
County, deceased. And to the 
Attorney General of said 
Commonwealth, if required. 

A petition has been presented to 
said Court for probate of a certain 
instrument purporting to be the last 
will of said deceased by ANN 
CARROLL of Quincy in the County 
of Norfolk, praying that she be 
appointed executrix thereof. 

If you desire to object thereto you 
or your attorney should file a written 
appearance in said Court at Dedham 
before ten o'clock in the forenoon on 
July 24, 1974, the return day of this 
citation. 

Witness, ROBERT M. FORD, 
Esquire, First Judge of said Court, 
this June 1-9, 1974. 

PAUL C. GAY, 
Register. 
6/27 7/3-11/74 



Page22Quin cy Sun Wednesday, July 3, 1974 
LEGAL NOTICES 



LEGAL NOTICES 



COMMONWEALTH OF 
MASSACHUSETTS 

Norfolk, ss. Superior Court 

No. 112,839 

To ROSAMOND E. MATTIE, 
NEAL L. CADOGAN, Administrator 
of the Estate of JULIE A. 
CADOC.AN, RICHARD W. BARRY, 

and the City of Quincy and to all 
persons entitled to the benefit of the 
Soldiers and Sailors Civil Relief Act 
of 1940 as amended HANCOCK 
BANK & TRUST COMPANY 
Greeting: 

Claiming to be the holder of a 
mortgage covering real property 
situated in Quincy, County of 
Norfolk given by Rosamond E. 
Mattie to Hancock Bank & Trust 
Company dated January 20, 1972 
and recorded January 20, 1972 with 
Norfolk County Registry of Deeds in 
Book 4802 page 496 has filed with 
said court a bill in equity for 
authority to foreclose said mortgage 
in the manner following: by entry to 
foreclose and by exercise of power of 
sale set forth in said mortgage. 

If you are entitled to the benefits 
of the Soldiers' and Sailors' Civil 
Relief Act of 1940 as amended, and 
you object to such foreclosure, you 
or your attorney should file a written 
appearance and answer in said court 
at Dedham on or before July 24, 
1974 or you may be forever barred 
from claiming that such foreclosure is 
invalid under said act. 

Witness, WALTER H. 
McLaughlin, Esquire, Chief 
Justice of our Superior Court, the 
12th day of June in the year of our 
Lord one thousand nine hundred and 
seventy-four. 

John P. Concannon, 
Clerk. 
6/20-27 7/3/74 



SHERIFF'S SALE 

Norfolk, ss. Quincy, May 29, 1974 

Seized and taken on execution and 
will sell at Public Auction on 
Wednesday, July 31, 1974 at 9 
o'clock in the forenoon at the 
Deputy Sheriffs Office, 875 Southern 
Artery, Quincy, Norfolk County, all 
the right, title and interest which 
Joseph Sullivan of Holbrook had 
[not exempt by law from attachment 
or levy on execution] on the 29th 
day of May, 1974 at 9 o'clock in the 
forenoon being the day and time the 
same was seized on execution in and 
to the following described real estate, 
to wit: 

The land, in Holbrook, in the 
County of Norfolk and 
Commonwealth of Massachusetts, 
bounded and described as follows: 

FIRST PARCEL: A certain parcel 
of land, with the dwelling house and 
stable thereon, situated on the 
easterly side of Franklin Street, in 
said Holbrook, and bounded: 

Beginning at the southwesteriy 
corner of land owned or occupied by 
Richard Hook; thence running 

Eastedy by said land of Hook to 
the parcel hereinafter described; 
thence running 

Southeriy by the parcel hereinafter 
described; thence running 

Westeriy in a parallel line with the 
northerly boundary by land now or 
formerly of Ellis C. Greaney to said 
Franklin Street; thence running 

Northerly by said Franklin Street 
about five [5] rods to the first 
mentioned bound, at land of said 
Hook. 

SECOND PARCEL: A certain 
paiLcel of land situated in said 
Holbrook and bounded and described 
as follows: 

Beginning at the northeast corner 
of the parcel of land fronting on 
■Franklin Street, hereinbefore 
described; thence running 

Easteriy fifty-two (52 1 feet to 
land formeriy of Bourbeau, now of 
McPherson, at the Southeast corner 
of land formeriy of Aaron Belcher, 
thence running 

Southeriy along said other land 
now of McPherson eighty-two and 
5/10 182.51 feet to a stake and 
stones; thence running 

Westeriy by a line parallel to the 
first mentioned bound fifty-two |52J 
feet to the southeast corner of the 
first described parcel; and thence 

Northeriy along the easteriy line of 
the first described parcel eighty-two 
and 5/10 [82.5] feet to the point of 
beginning. 

.Terms: Cash Donald L. White, 

Deputy Sheriff 
6/20-27 7/3/74 



COMMONWEALTH OF 

MASSACHUSETTS 

Norfolk, ss. Probate Court 

No. 168,407 

To all persons interested in the 
trust estate under the will of AGNES 
V. PHILBEN late of Quincy in said 
County, deceased, for the benefit of 
the children of some of the needy 
families in the City of Quincy. And 
to the Attorney General of said 
Commonwealth. 

The trustee of said estate has 
presented to said Court for allowance 
his fourth to sixth accounts inclusive. 

If you desire to object thereto you 
or your attorney should file a written 
appearance in said Court at Dedham 
before ten o'clock in the forenoon on 
July 17, 1974, the return day of this 
citation. 

Witness, ROBERT M. FORD, 
Esquire, First Judge of said Court, 
this June 11, 1974. 

PAUL C. GAY, 
Register. 
6/20-27 7/3/74 



COMMONWEALTH OF 

MASSACHUSETTS 

Norfolk, ss. Probate Court 

No. 191,900 

To all persons interested in the 
estate of SALLY W. SCHOUTEN 
also known as SALLY WRENN 
SCHOUTEN late of Quincy in said 
County, deceased. And to the 
Attorney General of said 
Commonwealth, if required. 

The executor of the will of said 
deceased has presented to said Court 
for allowance his first and final 
account. 

If you desire to object thereto you 
or your attorney should file a written 
appearance in said Court at Dedham 
before ten o'clock in the forenoon on 
July 17, 1974, the return day of this 
citation. 

Witness, ROBERT M. FORD, 
Esquire, First Judge of said Court, 
this June 10, 1974. 

PAUL C. GAY, 
Register. 
6/20-27 7/3/74 



COMMONWEALTH OF 

MASSACHUSETTS 

Norfolk, ss. Probate Court 

No. 74P793 

To HELEN M. SMITH of Quincy 
in said County, a person under 
conservatorship, to her heirs apparent 
or presumptive, and to the 
Massachusetts Department of Mental 
Health. And to the Attorney General 
of said Commonwealth, if required. 

The temporary conservator of the 
property of said ward has presented 
to said Court his first and final 
account for allowance. 

If you desire to object thereto you 
or your attorney should file a written 
appearance in said Court at Dedham 
before ten o'clock in the forenoon on 
July 10, 1974, the return day of this 
citation. 

Witness, ROBERT M. FORD, 
Esquire, First Judge of said Court, 
this June 7, 1974. 

PAUL C. GAY, 
Register. 
6/20-27 7/3/74 

COMMONWEALTH OF 

MASSACHUSETTS 

Norfolk, ss. Probate Court 

No. 74P1516 

To all persons interested in the 
estate of CHARLES M. JOHNSON 
late of Quincy in said County, 
deceased. And to the Attorney 
General of said Commonwealth, if 
required. 

A petition has been presented to 
said Court for probate of a certain 
instrument purporting to be the last 
will of said deceased by KATHRYN 
M. JOHNSON of Quincy in the 
County of Norfolk praying that she 
be appointed executrix thereof 
without giving a surety on her bond. 

If you desire to object thereto you 
or your attorney should file a written 
appearance in said Court at Dedham 
before ten o'clock in the forenoon on 
July 10, 1974, the return day of this 
citation. 

Witness, ROBERT M. FORD, 
Esquire, First Judge of said Court, 
this June 10, 1974. 

PAUL C. GAY, 
Register. 
6/20-27 7/3/74 



LEGAL NOTICES 

SHERIFF'S SALE 
Norfolk, ss. Quincy, August 6, 1973 

Seized and taken on execution and 
will sell at Public Auction on 
Tuesday, August 20, 1974 at 9:30 
o'clock in the forenoon at the 
Deputy Sheriffs Office, 875 Southern 
Artery, Quincy, Norfolk County, all 
the right, title and interest which 
John M. Williams of Weymouth, had 
I not exempt by law from attachment 
or levy on execution) on the 6th day 
of August 1973 at 9 o'clock in the 
forenoon being the day and time the 
same was seized on execution in and 
to the following described real estate, 
to wit: 

A certain parcel of land witi? the 
buildings thereon in Weymouth, 
Norfolk County bounded and 
described as follows: 

Westerly by Lake Shore Drive, 
sixty-five and seventy-four 
hundredths (65.74) feet; 

Northerly by a passageway shown 
on said plan, one hundred (100) 
feet; 

Easteriy by the shore line of 
Whitman's Pond, thirty-seven (37) 
feet; 

Southeriy by lot 38 on said plan, 
one hundred three ( 103 ) feet. 

Containing, according to said plan, 
five thousand two hundred (5,200) 
square feet of land. 
Terms: Cash Robert E. Brownell, 
Deputy Sheriff. 
6/27 7/3-11/74 

COMMONWEALTH OF 

MASSACHUSETTS 

Norfolk, ss. Probate Court 

No. 74P13S3 

To JOHN FEELEY of Quincy in 
'the County of Norfolk, and to his 
wife, heirs apparent or presumptive 
and to the Massachusetts Department 
of Mental Health. And to the 
Attorney General of said 
Commonwealth, if required. 

A petition has been presented to 
said Court alleging that said JOHN 
FEELEY has become incapacitated 
by reason of advanced age to 
properly care for his property and 
praying that VERNETTE E.WALSH 
of Waltham in the County of 
Middlesex, or some other suitable 
person, be appointed conservator of 
his property. 

If you desire to object thereto, 
you or your attorney should file a 
written appearance in said Court at 
Dedham before ten o'clock in the 
forenoon on July 17, 1974, the 
return day of this citation. 

Witness, ROBERT M. FORD, 
Esquire, First Judge of said Court, 
this June 11, 1974. 

PAUL C. GAY, 
Register. 
6/20-27 7/3/74 

COMMONWEALTH OF 

MASSACHUSETTS 

Norfolk, ss. Probate Court 

N0.74P1584 

To all persons interested in the 
estate of RAYMOND W. JOHNSON 
late of Quincy in said County, 
deceased. An to the Attorney 
General of said Commonwealth, if 
required. 

A petition has been presented to 
said Court for probate of a certain 
instrument purporting to be the last 
will of said deceased by ROBERT I. 
JOHNSON of Quincy in the County 
of Norfolk praying that he be 
appointed executor thereof without 
giving a surety on his bond. 

If you desire to object thereto you 
or your attorney should file a written 
appearance in said Court at Dedham 
before ten o'clock in the forenoon on 
July 24, 1974, the return day of this 
citation. 

Witness, ROBERT M. FORD, 
Esquire,- First Judge of said Court, 
this June 17, 1974. 

PAUL C. GAY, 
Register. 
6/27 7/3-11/74 



For HoMe 
Delivery 

Call 
471-3100 



LEGAL NOTICES 

SHERIFF'S SALE 
Norfolk, ss. Quincy, March 4, 1974 

Seized and taken on execution and 
will sell at Public Auction on 
Wednesday, Aug. 21, 1974 at 9:15 in 
the forenoon at the Deputy Sheriffs 
Office, 875 Southern Artery, Quincy, 
Norfolk County, all the right, title 
and interest with Lewis M. Baker of 
Braintree had (not exempt by law 
from attachment or levy on 
execution) on the 3rd day of August 
1969 at 9 o'clock in the forenoon 
being the day and time the same was 
attached on Mesne Process in and to 
the following described real estate, to 
wit: a certain parcel of land with all 
the buildings thereon in Braintree, 
Norfolk County bounded and 
described as follows: 

Southwesteriy by Armstrong 
Circle, fifiy and thirty-five 
hundredths (50.35) feet; 

Northwesterly by lot 10 on said 
plan, one hundred, and sixty 
hundredths (100.60) feet; 

Northeasterly by land now or 
formerly of John Leo and Thomas 
Leo, eighty and thirty-five 
hundredths (80.35) feet; 

Southeasterly by a future road on 
said plan, seventy and sixty 
hundredths (70,60) feet; and 

Southeriy by a curved line forming 
the junction of said future road and 
ArmsUong Circle, forty-seven and 
twelve hundredths (47.12) feet; 

Containing according to said plan, 
seven thousand eight hundred ninety 
(7,890) square feet of land. 
Terms: Cash Donald L. White,' 

Deputy Sheriff 
6/27 7/3-11/74 

COMMONWEALTH OF 

MASSACHUSETTS 

Norfolk, ss. Probate Court 

No. 188,297 

To all persons interested in the 
estate of PHYLLIS E. HARDY late 
of Quincy in said County, deceased. 
And to the Attorney General of said 
Commonwealth, if required. 

The executor of the will of said 
deceased has presented to said Court 
for allowance his second and final 
account. 

If you desire to object thereto you 
or your attorney should file a written 
appearance in said Court at Dedham 
before ten o'clock in the forenoon on 
July 17, 1974, the return day of this 
citarion. 

Witness, ROBERT M. FORD, 
Esquire, First Judge of said Court, 
this June 12, 1974. 

PAUL C. GAY, 
Register. 
6/20-27 7/3/74 

COMMONWEALTH OF 

MASSACHUSETTS 

Norfolk, ss. Probate Court 

No. 135,102 

To all persons interested in the 
trust estate under the will of 
NAPOLEON J. GUAY late of 
Qumcy in said County, deceased, for 
the benefit of BEATRICE E. 
PRIEST. 

The trustee of said ertate has 
presented to said Court for allowance 
its thirteenth to sixteenth accounts, 
inclusive. 

If you desire to object thereto you 
or your attorney should file a written 
appearance n said Court at Dedham 
before ten o'clock in the forenoon on 
July 17, 1974, the return day of this 
citation. 

Witness, ROBERT M. FORD, 
Esquire, First Judge of said Court, 
this June 14, 1974. 

PAUL C. GAY, 
Register. 
6/20-27 7/3/74 

COMMONWEALTH OF 

MASSACHUSETTS 

Norfolk, ss. Probate Court 

No. 74D0810 

To DIANE K. PROTO of Bulixi, 
Miss. 

A libel has been presented to said 
Court by your husband, STEVEN C. 
PROTO praying that a divorce from 
the bond of matrimony between 
himself and you be decreed for the 
cause of cruel and abusive treatment. 

If you desire to object thereto, 
you or your attorney should file a 
written appearance in said Court at 
Dedham within twenty-one days 
from July 31, 1974, the return day 
of this citation. 

Witness, ROBERT M. FORD, 
Esquire, First Judge of said Court, 
this June 11, 1974. 

PAUL C. GAY, 
Register. 
6/20-27 7/3/74 



LEGAL NOTICES 



COMMONWEALTH OF 

MASSACHUSETTS 

Norfolk, ss. Probate Court 

No. 74 DOS 30 

To BARBARA J. O'HALLORAN 

of Kmgsport, Tenn. 

A libel has been presented to said 
Court by your husband FRANCIS X. 
O'HALLORAN praying that a 
divorce from the bond of matrimony 
between himself and you be decreed 
for the cause of cruel and abusive 
treatment, and praying for custody 
of minor children. 

If you desire to object thereto, 
you or your attorney should file a 
written appearance in said Court at 
Dedham within twenty-one days 
from July 31, 1974, the return day 
of this citarion. 

Witness, ROBERT M. FORD, 
Esquire, First Judge of said Court, 
this June 11, 1974. 

PAUL C. GAY, 
Register. 
6/20-27 7/3/74 

SHERIFF'S SALE 
Norfolk, ss. Quincy, June 18, 1973 

Seized and taken on execution and 
will sell at Public Auction on 
Tuesday, August 20, 1974 at 10 
o'clock in the forenoon at the 
Deputy Sheriffs Office, 875 Southern 
Artery, Quincy, Norfolk County, all 
the right, title and interest which 
Agnes E. Smart of Milton had (not 
exempt by law from attachment or 
levy on execution) on the 18th day 
of June 1973 at 9 o'clock in the 
forenoon being the day and time the 
same was seized on execution in and 
to the following described real estate 
to wit: of that certain parcel of land 
situate in MILTON in the County of 
Norfolk and said Commonwealth, 
bounded and described as follows: 

Northwesteriy by Lincoln Street, 
fifty (50) feet; 

Northeasteriy by lot numbered 12, 
shown on the plan hereinafter 
referred to, two hundred one and 
31/100(201.31) feet; 

Southeasterly by lots numbered 22 
and 21 , shown on said plan, fifty and 
31/100(50.31) feet; and 

Southwesteriy by lot numbered 
14, shown on said plan, two hundred 
six and 93/100 (206.93) feet. 
Terms: Cash Robert E. Brownell, 
Deputy Sheriff 
6/27 7/3-11/74 

COMMONWEALTH OF 

MASSACHUSETTS 

Norfolk, ss. Probate Court 

No. 74D0824 

To DAVID R. BENNETT of 
DamarLscotta, Maine. 

A libel has been presented to said 
Court by your wife IRENE E. 
BENNETT praying that a divorce 
from the bond of matrimony 
between herself and you be decreed 
for the cause of cruel and abusive 
treatment. 

If you desire to object thereto, 
you or your attorney should file a 
written appearance in said Court at 
Dedham within twenty-one days 
from July 31, 1974, the return day 
of this citation. 

Witness, ROBERT M. FORD, 
Esquire, First Judge of said Court, 
this June 11, 1974. 

PAUL C. GAY, 
Register. 
6/20-27 7/3/74 

COMMONWEALTH OF 
MASSACHUSETTS 

Norfolk, ss. Probate Court 

NO.74P1508 

To all persons interested in the 
estate of GRACE J. DINEEN late of 
Quincy in said County, deceased. 
And to the Attorney General of said 
Commonwealth, if required. 

A petition has been presented to 
said Court for probate of a certain 
instrument purporting to be the last 
will of said deceased by ANN G. 
ALEXANDER of Weymouth in the 
County of Norfolk praying that she 
be appointed executrix thereof 
without giving a surety on her bond. 

If you desire to object thereto you 
or your attorney should file a written 
appearance in said Court at Dedham 
before ten o'clock in the forenoon on 
July 10, 1974, the return day of this 
citation. 

Witness, ROBERT M. FORD, 
Esquire, First Judge of .said Court, 
this June 6, 1974. 

PAUL C. GAY, 
Register. 
6/13-20-27/74 



ufi'h- ^ 



Wednesday, July 3, 1974 Quincy Sun Page 23 



WSS.^^A.VlJ' 




LEGAL NOTICES 



COMMONWi: ALTH OF 

MASSACHUSETTS 

Norfolk, ss. Probate Court 

No. 74P1459 

To all persons interested in the 
estate of GERTRUDE B. HOLTON 
late of Quincy in said County, 
deceased. And to the Attorney 
General of said Commonwealth, if 
required. 

A petition has been presented to 
said Court for probate of a certain 
instrument purporting to be the last 
will of said deceased by LOUISE G. 
WORTH of Quincy in the County of 
Norfolk and MARY E. RACE of 
Northfield in the State of Vermont 
praying that they be appointed 
executrices thereof without giving a 
surety on their bonds. 

If you desire to object thereto you 
or your attorney should file a written 
appearance in said Court at Dedham 
before ten o'clock in the forenoon on 
July 10, 1974, the return day of this 
citation. 

Witness, ROBERT M. FORD, 
Esquire, First Judge of said Court, 
this June 3, 1974. 

PAUL C. GAY, 
Register. 
6/20-27 7/3/74 

COMMONWEALTH OF 

MASSACHUSETTS 

Norfolk, ss. Probate Court 

No. 74P1384 

To VIVIAN FEELEY of Quincy in 
the County of Norfolk, and to her 
husband, heirs apparent or 
presumptive and to the Massachusetts 
Department of Mental Health. And 
to the Attorney General of said 
Commonwealth, if required. 

A petition has been presented to 
said Court alleging that said VIVIAN 
FEELEY has become incapacitated 
by reason of advanced age, to 
properly care for her property and 
praying that VERNETTE E. WALSH 
of Waltham in the County of 
Middlesex, or some other suitable 
person, be appointed conservator of 
her property. 

If you desire to object thereto,, 
you or your attorney should file a 
written appearance in said Court at 
Dedham before ten o'clock in the 
forenoon on July 17, 1974, the 
return day of this citation. 

Witness, ROBERT M. FORD, 
Esquire, First Judge of said Court, 
this June 11,1974. 

PAUL C. GAY, 
Register. 
6/20-27 7/3/74 

COMMONWEALTH OF 

MASSACHUSETTS 

Norfolk, ss. Probate Court 

No. 199,301 

To all persons interested in the 
estate of MARION A. HASKINS, late 
of Quincy in said County, deceased. 
And to the Attorney General of said 
Commonwealth, if required. 

A petition has been presented to 
said Court for probate of a certain 
instrument purporting to be the last 
will of said deceased by SOUTH 
SHORE NATIONAL BANK of 
Quincy 'in the County of Norfolk 
praying that it be appointed executor 
thereof without giving a surety on its 
bond. 

If you desire to object thereto you 
or your attorney should file a written 
appearance in said Court at Dedham 
before ten o'clock in the forenoon on 
July 17, 1974, the return day of this 
citation. 

Witness, ROBERT M. FORD, 
Esquire, First Judge of said Court, 
this June 14, 1974. 

PAUL C. GAY, 
Register. 
6/27 7/3-11/74 




HELP WANTED 



HEtrWANTED 



HOCKEY 



Face of Circle Sports Inc. will be holding 
more interviews to select go-getters for our 
hockey school and broadcasts. In person 
interview only. Call Mr. Yeager for 
appointment. 396-1350. 

7/11 



LEGAL JNOTICES 



COMMONWEALTH OF 
MASSACHUSETTS 

Norfolk, ss. Probate Court 

No. 74P1035 

To all persons interested in the 
estate of HELEN M. SMITH late of 
Quincy in said County, deceased, 
testate. And to the Attorney General 
of said Commonwealth, if required. 

A petition has been presented to 
said Court for license to sell at 
private sale certain real estate of said 
deceased which is situated in said 
Quincy, in accordance with the offer 
set out in said petition. 

If you desire to object thereto you 
or your attorney should file a written 
appearance in said Court at Dedham 
before ten o'clock in the forenoon on 
July 31, 1974, the return day of this 
citation. 

Witness, ROBERT M. FORD, 
Esquire, First Judge of said Court, 
this June 26, 1974. 

PAUL C. GAY, 
Register. 
7/3-11-18/74 

COMMONWEALTH OF 
MASSACHUSETTS 

Norfolk, ss. Probate Court 

No. 74P1457 

To all persons interested in the 
estate of MARGARET H. FOLEY 
late of Quincy in said County, 
deceased. And to the Attorney 
General of said Commonwealth, if 
required. 

A petition has been presented to 
said Court for probate of a certain 
instrument purporting to be the last 
will of said deceased by GEORGE R. 
LOWE of Quincy in the County of 
Norfolk praying that he be appointed 
executor thereof without giving a 
surety on his bond. 

If you desire to object thereto you 
or your attorney should file a written 
appearance in said Court at Dedham 
before ten o'clock in the forenoon on 
Sept. 4, 1974, the return day of this 
citation. 

Witness, ROBERT M. FORD, 
Esquire, First Judge of said Court, 
this June 4, 1974. 

PAUL C. GAY, 
Register. 
6/20-27 7/3/74 



LEGAL NOTICES 

COMMONWEALTH OF 

MASSACHUSETTS 

Norfolk, ss. Probate Court 

No. 74P1610 

To all persons interested in the 
estate of VONIE I. BARNES late of 
Quincy, in said County, deceased. 

A petition has been presented to 
said Court for probate of a certain 
instrument purporting to be the last 
will of said deceased by AGNES A. 
BRADLEY of North Miami, in the 
State of Florida, praying that she be 
appointed executrix thereof without 
giving a surety on her bond. 

If you desire to object thereto you 
or your attorney should file a written 
appearance in said Court at Dedham 
before ten o'clock in the forenoon on 
July 31, 1974, the return day of this 
citation. 

Witness, ROBERT M. FORD, 
Esquire, First Judge of said Court, 
this June 24, 1974. 

PAUL C. GAY, 
Register. 
7/3-11-18/74 

COMMONWEALTH OF 
MASSACHUSETTS 

Norfolk, ss. Probate Court 

No. 74P1466 

To all persons interested in the 
estate of PHILIP FRANKEL late of 
Quincy in said County, deceased. 
And to the Attorney General of said 
Commonwealth, if required. 

A petition has been presented to 
said Court for probate of a certain 
instrument purporting to be the last 
will of said deceased by HYMAN M. 
FRANKFL of Quincy in the County 
of Norfolk praying that he or some 
other suitable person, be appointed 
administrator with the will annexed 
of said estate. 

If you desire to object thereto you 
or your attorney should file a written 
appearance in said Court at Dedham 
before ten o'clock in the forenoon on 
July 17, 1974, the return day of this 
citation. 

Witness, ROBERT M. FORD, 
Esquire, First Judge of said Court, 
this June 10, 1974. 

PAUL C. GAY, 
Register. 
6/27 7/3-11/74 



SERVICES OFFERED 



SERVICES OFFERED 




\ART FLOOR CO., Inc. 

ctSbAe the EMood with . . . 

LINOLEUM 

& TILE 

KENTILE • AMTICO • ARMSTRONG 

CONGOLEUM 

SOLD and INSTALLED 

HARDWOOD FLOORS, LAID & REFINISHED by our SPECIALISTS; 
Complete Line of Ceramic Tile • Carpeting 

dial . . . 328-6970 

115 Sagamore St., NORTH QUINCY 



LICENSED 
ELECTRICIAN 

Douglas W. Mason Jr. No job too 
small. Free Estimates. CaH 
328-5743 anytime. 

7/25 

KEYS MADE 

Locksmith on Duty 

GRANITE CITY 

HARDWARE 

1617 Hancock St., Quincy 

479-5454 



T.F. 



CARPET INSTALLATION 

BOB QUINLAN 

Wall-To-Wall Carpet 

Expert Installation 

* KNOW YOUR INSTALLER 

* 20 YEARS EXPERIENCE 

* ALL WORK GUARANTEED 

* FULLY INSURED 

When buying your carpet, tell the 

salesman you have your own 

installer. It will save you money. 

Tel: 826-4094 

7/3 

FOR SALE 
REFRIGERATOR 

15.5 cu. ft. Admiral, Coppcrtone, 
excellent condition. $200 or best. 
Two back seats for Van. Call 

Linda, 479-837 L 

7/3 

MATTRESSES 

MATTRESSES - Immediate 
Delivery. Can you use 
exceptionally good buys on king, 
queen, full or twin mattresses, 
beds, trundles, bunks at discount. 
Brand names. Sealy, Eclipse, 
Slumberland, Englander, etc. 
Bedding has been our only 
business for over 20 years. Open 
eves.. Siesta Sleep Shops, 221 
Parkingway, Quincy, Corner of 
School Street. 

T.F. 



Save Gas and Money 
shop locally. 



C & R ROOFING 

Roofs, gutters. No Job Too Small. 
Prices can't be beat. 

471-3205 479-3566 



7/3 



CARPENTRY 

Licensed builder, 26 years 
experience. Repairs, remodeling & 
additions. No job too small. Free 
estimates. Charles J. Ross, 
479-3755. • T.F. 

HALL FOR RENT 

North Quincy K. of C. Building, 5 
Hollis Ave. For information 
■"lease call 

328-5552- 328-0087 



328-9822 



T.F. 



HALLS FOR HIRE 

Weddings - showers - meetings - 
banquets. Elks Home, 1220 
Hancock St., Quincy, 



472-2223. 



T.F. 



CHILD CARE 

Rent-A-Parcnt. Young married 
South Shore couples will care for 
your home and children while 
you enjoy your vacation. 
Interviews and References 
available. 

UNIVERSITY 
HOME SERVICES 
961-1616 RANDOLPH 
449-3590 NEEDHAM 

T.F. 

ARCHIE'S LAWN 
MOWER SERVICE 

Guarantee Quality Work. Honest 
Prices. No job too small. Free 
Estimates. 92 South Central 
Avenue, Wollaston. 472-8675. 
8/29 

INSURANCE 



HOME OWNERS RATES ARE 
LOWER: If you have a basic 
Homeowner's policy for $20,000 
and are paying more than $62.00 
a year, call 282-4412 at once. 
Rutstein Insurance Agency. T.F. 



Index for 
Classified 

A Services 

B For Sale 

C Autos 

D Boats 

E For Rent 

F .Help Wanted 

G Pets, Livestock 

H. Lost and Found 

I. Real Estate for Sale 

J Real Estate Wanted 

K Miscellaneous 

L Work Wanted 

M Antiques 

N Coins and Stamps 

O Rest Homes 

P Instruction 




MAIL TO: QUINCY SUN 1601 Hancock St., Quincy 02169 
WANT ADS PAYABLE IN ADVANCE...cash must accompany order 
Enclosed '° <'»'• the following ad to ■•■"" times 



COPY:, 



JCofitnct lite: 



$2.50 for one week, up to 20 word, ^i each additional word. 
$2.25 per week, up to 20 words for three or more insertions of 

the same ad. 
10 Consecutive issues $2.00 per week 
No refund will be made at this contract rate in the event of 

cancellation. 

Deadline: Friday 5 P.M. for the following weeks publication. 
Please 'include your phone number in ad. 



Page 24 Quincy Sun Wednesday, July 3, 1974 

Honored By Friends, Relatives 



^Don't Be An Old Grouch\ Advises 'Pop' On 90th 




KING FOR A DAY - Roland "Pop" Josselyn sits in the chair of honor as 21 relatives help him celebrate 
his 90th birthday Saturday. From left, first row: Dickie Josselyn, grandson; Ann MacDonald, 
great-granddaughter; Laurie MacDonald, great-granddaughter; Charlene Josselyn, granddaughter; Nancy 
Josselyn, in front of Charlene, granddaughter; Jacob Smullen, great-grandson; Pop Josselyn; Joan 
MacDonald, great-granddaughter; David Smullen, grandson; Bill MacDonald, great-grandson. Second 
row: Fred Spencer, nephew; Mary Alice Smullen, granddaughter; Dick Smullen, grandson; Gilbert 
Josselyn, son; Barbara Josselyn, daughter-in-law, Louise Smullen, daughter; Myrtle Ermoian, daughter; 
Kenneth Josselyn, son; Steven Moore, grandson; Christine Moore, granddaughter; Happy MacDonald, 
grandson; Madelyn MacDonaki, granddaughter. 

[William MacDonald Photo] 



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Member South Shore 
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[Also see Sunbeams, Page 11/ 

Most people stop counting 
birthdays after 40 - or they try 
to forget them. 

But Roland [Pop] Josselyn is 
still counting, and remembering, 
at 90. An open house was held 
on the big day - Saturday - at the 
home of Pop's granddaughter 
and her husband, Mr. and Mrs. 
William MacDonald of 1 109 Sea 
St., Houghs Neck. 

Pop's great-grandchildren 
decorated the house which 
welcomed 75 birthday-wishing 
neighbors and passers-by. Ward 1 
Councillor Leo J. Kelly stopped 
by to congratulate Pop. 

Late in the afterqoon, Pop 
and 50 friends and relatives 
feasted at a cookout. A group of 
friends headed by Mrs. Kay 
Dennis presented Pop with a 
money tree. A cake baked and 
decorated by Mrs. Abbie 
Sinesand had the number '90" 
inscribed on top. 



But Pop laughingly turned the 
"9" upside-down, saying, "Look 
how old I am -60!" 

Pop Josselyn was a carpenter 
and builder by trade, working 
out of Brockton and Quincy. He 
was fourth in a family of six 
children. 

He was active in boy scouting 
for 35 years. He was a cub 
master for many years and' 
served on scout committees. 

Pop's advice to others wishing 
to match his age will be 
welcomed with cheers: 

"Don't worry about weight 
and height, about being fat oi 
thin. I eat everything." 

But then Pop wisely adds, 
"Keep busy". 

Pop raised four children of his 
own and has 1 1 grandchildren 
and 8 great-grandchildren. No 
wonder he say: 

"Look at life the right way. 
Take an interest in your 
children. And don't be an old 
grouch." 



Guest Jogs 180 
Miles To Wedding 



Sixteen-year-old Peter J. 
Creedon, nephew of Quincy 
School Supt. Dr. Lawrence 
Creedon, traveled from St. 
James, Long Island to attend the 
wedding of his uncle Eugene 
Creedon. 

But Peter did not drive to 
Quincy. He did not fly, nor did 
he hitchhike. He jogged. 

Peter and three friends jogged 
the 180-mile distance between 
St. James and Roslindale, 
earning money for a Long Island 
hospital mile by mile. 

By the time Peter, Glenn 
Luce, 16, Jeff Quinn, 15, and 
Bryan Shea, 16, cooled their 
tired feet in Dr. Creedon's pool, 
they had raised $1,500. 

The boys left Long Island last 



Monday equipped with sturdy 
jogging shoes and a 
wagon-toting-bicycle. The wagon 
contained a tent and sleeping 
bags, for the boys camped out 
most of the time. One night, 
however, they stayed in a 
dormitory at Brown University. 
Their trip ended five days later 
in Belleview Park, Roslindale. 

The boys took turns riding 
the bike while the other three 
diligently jogged behind. They 
covered approximately 38 miles 
each day. 

But the boys were certainly 
prepared for their gruelling trip, 
for all of them are metnbers of 
the cross-country team at 
Smithtown High School in New 
York. 



Reminds Candidates 
To Obey Sign Laws 



Quincy Building Inspector 
Allan F. MacDonald has issued a 
reminder to candidates in the 
fall election that the city has 
laws governing the display of 



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'training 

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political signs. 

Zoning Ordinance Chapter 24, 
Section 81, as amended, states: 

"In any business or industrial 
district, signs or advertising 
devices shall be permitted only 
as follows: 

"Temporary political signs, 
not exceeding 32 square feet in 
area, may be erected no sooner 
than 30 days before any primary 
"election and must be removed 
by the property owners 14 days 
after the general election. • 

"No political signs shall be 
permitted in any residence 
district." 

Paul Johnson 

Promoted To 

Fire Lieutenant 

Firefighter Paul G. Johnson of 
71 Cliff St., West Quincy was 
promoted to Heutenant Monday. 

Johnson, 40, joined Quincy's 
Fire Department on March 27, 
1965. He is temporarily assigned 
to Engine 3 at Quincy Point. 



Newscarriers 
Wanted 

Boys- Girls 

'Start Your Own 
Quincy Sun Paper Route^ 

Call 471- 3100 



■■ 



Thomas Crane Public Library 

Box 379 

Quincy, Mass. 02169 




Vol. 6 No. 43 
Thursday, July 11, 1974 



2«tiMe^4 Omt TVteiUf 7te(M^A/lte% 




THREE-LEGGED RACE at Fore River Field, Quincy Point, was one of the features of the Ward 2 Civic 
Association sponsored July 4th celebration. 




FOOT RACES were one of the highlights of Germantown July 4th field day at Baker Beach. 




The 4th Of July 

Still Has Special 

Meaning In Quincy 





4> 




1 ■""^■^;- 


"?f**^ 


■'*:'' 
. .-*« 


^ 


- !>•■ 






MISS MERRYMOUNT, Carol Loughlin, 15, and Junior Miss 
Merrymount, Pamela Norton, 4, wave during Merrymount 
Association sponsored parade, one of its many July 4th activities. 




MISS HOUGHS NECK, Cheryl Bergstrom. 15 [second leftl receives trophy from her predecessor, Tish 
Cullen. Looking on are Susan Dolan, winner of best hairdo and Terry Bergstrom, best sports outfit. It 
was a highlight of the Houghs Neck Community Council sponsored activities. 



HELPING HANDS were needed for the greased pole climbing 
contest at Faxon Park sponsored by the Adams Heights Men's Club. 



(Quincy Sun Photos 
By Laban Whittaker) 



■iV. 



Page 2 Quincy SuTJ Thursday, July 1 lvl974 




Published weekly on Thursday by 

The Quincy Sun Publishing Company 

1601 Hancock St., Quincy, Massachusetts 02169 

Publisher and Editor 

Henry W. Bosworth, Jr. 

Advertising Director 

John B. Powers 

10^ Per Copy - $4.00 Per Year - Out of State $5.00 Per Year 

Telephone: 471-3100 471-3101 471-3102 

Second-Class Postage Paid at Boston, Mass. 

MEMBER NEW ENGLAND PRESS ASSOCIATION 

The Quincy Sun asjumes no financial responsibility for 
typographical errors in advertisements but will reprint that part of 
an advertisement in which the typographical error occurs. 



LaRaia: 'Can Be Reversed' 

Council Continues Battle With Mayor 
Over Trash-Garbage Collection 



JO From Quincy Receive 
Massasoit 



Deg 



Nine Quincy men . and . a 
WoUaston woman received 
associate degrees at this year's 
commencement exercises at 
Massasoit Community College, 
Brockton. 

Among the 575 graduates 
were: , . ' 

Patricia Callahan, George J. 



rees 

Coletti, Robert A,. DrjscoU, 
Richard A. Giglio, James A. 
Gilmore, Robert Kelley, John F. 
Leblanc, Daniel P. Schwemin, 
Harvey Siebert and Ronnie L. 
Wier. 

Congresswoman Margaret M. 
Heckler, ,10th Congressional 
District, addressed'the graduates. 



By MARYANN DUGGAN 

The City Council this week 
refused to toss in the towel in its 
battle with Mayor Walter 
Hannon over the combined 
collection of garbage and trash. 
Although the Mayor was saying . 
the operation was "going 
smoothly" and praised residents 
for their cooperation, Councillor 
Joseph LaRaia declared: 

"The Mayor's actions can be 
reversed. The important thing is 
not to let the issue die when the 
Mayor says the operation is 
going well." 

■Meanwhile Councillors James 
Sheets and Warren Powers 
continued their efforts to halt 
the disposal of garbage in any 
Sanitary ' landfill facility in 
Quincy. 

A special City Council 
meeting was c?lled by Council 
Presfdtnt Arthur Tobirt for 
Wednesday night at the request 
of LaRaia. 

Af this rrieeting the council 



was to formally receive Mayor 
Hannon's veto of three council 
orders pertaining to the 
trash-garbage collection. 

LaRaia noted that the council 
would then have seven days 
before it could officially act on 
the vetos. A two-thirds [six] 
vote would be required to 
override the vetos. 

"There's a chance-50-50," 
said LaRaia, "that his [the 
Mayor's] actions can be 
reversed." 

LaRaia also said: "There have 
been trucks from out of town 
coming into the Quincy dump. 
Do we take their garbage, too?" 

The council's agenda hsted 
three vetoed items for 
discussion. The first was 
introduced by LaRaia calling for 
the separate collection of 
rubbish and garbage in Quincy. 
Underscoring the urgency of the 
order, the Council had attached 
to it an emergency preamble 
declaring the order "an 



SOUTH SHORE 
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VS. 

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BANKS 



A savings account at a savings bank will pay you about V4 % more than 
a savings account at South Shore National Bank. 

For most people, who average somewhere under $1 000 in savings, 
that comes to around $3 a year. 

So we say, put your savings into South Shore National, in a 
Multistatement account. 

We'll give you free checking. 

And 10% refunds on the interest you pay on your loans. 

And you'll come out way ahead with us. (We're beating the savings 
banks at their own game.) 



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emergency law necessary.. .to 
promote the health, safety and 
welfare" of Quincy residents and 
property. 

The Mayor, however, 
discounted the need for an 
emergency preamble. In his 
veto-statement to the Council, 
Hannon noted that the Mass. 
Department of Public Health 
approves the combined 
collection and disposition of 
garbage and rubbish. 

"Therefore I see no danger to 
pubhc health and no need for an 
emergency preamble," he said. 

The Mayor also cited Norfolk 
Superior Court Judge Vincent 
Brogna's ruhng that a mixed 
collection is not a health hazard. 

Hannon called the City 
Council ordinance 
"unenforceable," since it would 
force the Quincy dump to close 
.and thus "cost the city millions 
of dollars to dispose of its 
rubbish and garbage outside city 
hmits." 

, The City council had also 
approved a resolve which would 
have prohibited cities and towns 
in Massachusetts from mixing 
garbage and rubbish. 

But the Mayor also vetoed the 
resolve, saying that 81 cities and 
towns throughout the state 
operate under a contract 
dictating a combined pick-up of 
rubbish and garbage. The passage 
of the resolve would thus fofce 
those communities to breach 
their contracts, he said. 

The Council's special agenda 
also dealt with a proposed 
change in city ordinance 
introduced by Councillors 
Sheets and Powers. The change 
would clarify Section 37, 
Chapter 15 of the City 
ordinances which now reads: 

"No person shall deposit in 
any dump, public or private, any 
animal or vegetable material, or 
other material which shall 
become a breeding place for 
rodents, flies or vermin." 

The Sheets-Powers 
amendment to this ordinance 
would read: "No person shall 
dump garbage in a public or 
private landfill facility or dump 
in Quincy. Garbage is defined as 
animal, vegetable or other 
organic waste." 

Powers delineated the 
differences between Section 37 
as it stands and Section 37 as 
amended, noting that the latter 
specifically mentions as well as 
defines "garbage" and 
specifically mentions the phrase 
'Mandfill facility." 

The present Section 37 
neither mentions nor defines 
garbage, nor does it use-ihe 

(Cont'd on Page 17) 



WOODWARD'S 

EXPERT ' 
DISC BRAKE 
WORK 

for 

ALL CARS 

111 Mayor McGratti Highway 

Quinqf,Ma$s. 



Tel. 773-1200 



U 



Thursday, July 1 1 , 1974 Quincy Sun Page 3 



Tax Rate Will Still 
Increase Despite 

$1.1 Million Windfall 



By JAMES COLLINS 

Although Quincy will receive 
an additional amount of 
$1,141,982 in state 
reimbursement as a result of 
revision of the Cherry Sheet 
there will still be a sizeable tax 
increase for Quincy homeowners 
Mayor Walter J. Hannon reports. 

The additional reimbursement 
the city will receive is equal to a 
saving of $4. on the city's tax 
rate city officials pointed out. 
Last year's rate was $154.50. 

The funds the city will receive 
are in addition to the 
$8,262,126 the city is due to 
receive in state and county 
reimbursements when the first 
Cherry Sheets were released In 
April. 

Mayor Hannon said the tax 
rate will increase because of 
three factors already known: A 
City Council passed a budget of 
$62,028,177; a total assessed 



valuation of the city of 
$154,000,000; and the total 
revised Cherry Sheet figure of 
$9,438,107. 

Mayor Hannon said that it 
will be some time yet before all 
the city employee bargaining 
units agree on their contracts 
and the tax rate can be set. The 
only city department near a 
settlement is the Public Works. 

Quincy will pick up under the 
revised Cherry Sheet figures 
$519,825 on its County tax; 
$27,724 on its County hospital 
tax; $22,527 on MDC park 
taxes; $40,125 on highway 
taxes; $232,271 on Chapter 70; 
$132,877 on the State highway 
fund; and $274,933 on State 
lottery reimbursements. 

These gains are offset, 
however, by Cherry Sheet 
revisions which will cost the city 
$8,172 in taxes on state owned 
land and $100,228 on 
machinery distribution tax. 




Legislation Will Save City 
$1,1 Million In Assessments 



SGT. WILLIAM C. CARULLO, a familiar face on the City Hall beat, was honored at a testimonial at 
VFW Hall recently on the eve of his retirement after more than 41 years on the Quincy Police 
Department. Left to right, Mrs. Fosolena Ameno and Mn. Amilio Mazzetti, his sisters; William S. 
Carullo, his son; Sgt. and Mrs. Carullo; Sen Arthur H. Tobin; City Clerk John Giliis;and Mrs. Louise C. 
Zeni, his sister. Sgt. Carullo retires July 1. 

'Millions LosV 

Shipyard Strike In 114th Day 



The City of Quincy will save 
over $1,100,000 this year and in 
coming years in county 
assessments by a locally initiated 
bill signed into law by Gov. 
Francis Sargent. 

The bill was co-sponsored by 
Representative William D. 
Delahunt and Thomas F. 
Brownell of Quincy. 

The legislators in a letter to 
Mayor Walter J. Hannon said 



they hoped that savings resulting 
from the legislation coupled 
with the city's eiTorts to cut 
spending on the local level will 
hold the line on any property 
tax increase this year. 

Delahunt and Brownell 
pointed out that many of the 
property owners especially the 
elderly will be unable to handle 
any further increases in the tax 
rate. 



Blood Supply 'Very Low\ 
Red Cross Seeks Donors 



Mrs. Mildred Ambrosia, 
Volunteer Blood Donor 
Chairman for the Greater 
Quincy Red Cross Chapter is 
appealing to residents of the 
Quincy area to donate a pint 
of blood as supplies "are very 
low at this time". 

Eligible to donate are those 
in good health between the 



ages of 18 and 66. With 
parental consent those 17 
years old can donate blood. 
The Bloodmobile will be at 
Temple Beth El, 1001 
Hancock St., on Friday, July 
19, between the hours of 1 
and 5 p.m. Prospective 
donors should call 472-2700 
for an appointment. 



iVeii? Students Must Enroll 



All students new to the 
Quincy public schools eligible 
for enrollment in Quincy High 
School, North Quincy High 
School, or the Vocational 
Technical School should report 
to the Guidance office this week 
and from Aug. 5 to the 30th. 



Members of the Guidance 
staff will be available each day 
to meet with students and their 
parents to assist them with 
admission . procedures and 
program planning. Students 
should bring transfer cards with 
them. 



The strike at the Quincy 
Shipyard of General Dynamics 
which entered its 1 14th day 
Tuesday in the opinion of a 
Federal Mediator has cost the 
South Shore area millions of lost 
dollars. 

Federal and State mediators, 
the shipyard unions, and 
management officials were called 
into a mediation session Tuesday 
at the John F. Kennedy Building 
in the Government Center, 
Boston. 

W. J. Usery, head of the 
Federal Mediation Service in 
Washington, D.C., said the 
economic loss to the company, 
union members, and the 
communities on the South Shore 
has already run into millions of 
dollars. 

Attending the meeting were 
members of the shipyard unions, 
representatives of General 
Dynamics, federal and state 
mediators. Representing the 
Federal Mediation Service was 
Norman Walker of the 
Washington office; Richard 
Goggin of the Boston area 
office; and David Grodsky of the 
State Board of Conciliation and 
Arbitration. 



General Dynamics terms it 
"production improvements". 
However Local 5 composed of 
production works calls it 



"shipyard mechanics" or jacks 
of all trades. The union has sent 
a letter to its members listing 64 
issues still unresolved. 




Wedgwood 

signed originals . . . 

the ultimate gift • 

If they love beautiful things, Wedgwood 
is the gift they'll cherish above all! 
Each piece from the famous Wedgwood family 
of England is a signed original. We show 
Blue Jasper with delicate white etchings, 
cameo-like but durable-and just a 
sampling of the collection of Wedgwood 
bone china, queensware and stoneware 
awaiting you at Remick's. Teapot $65.00 
Cake Plate $28.00 Covered Jar $24.00 



>»••-■•• 



Page 4 Quincy Sun Thursday, July 1 1 , 1974 




MARRIED - Mr. and Mrs. John F. Joyce were married recently in 
St. John's Church, Quincy. Mrs. Joyce is the former Susan E. 
McQuinn, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Howard McQuinn of 24 Macy 
St., Quincy. Mr. Joyce is the son of Mrs. Stella Joyce of 13 Brooks 
Ave., Quincy. Both are graduates of Quincy High School. After a 
wedding trip to Canada, they will live in Quincy. 
[Peter A. Markhard Photo] 

1000 Southern Artery 
Plans July Activities 



1000 Southern Artery has 
invited the Massachusetts Eye 
and Ear Infirmary of Boston to 
sponsor a glaucoma detection 
program July 17 at 12:30 p.m. 

Those needing treatment will 
be referred to local physicians. 
This screening is for members of 
1000 Southern Artery only. 
Reservations must be made to 
participate. 

The center has planned other 
events for the month of July. 

The second cook-out of the 
season will take place Monday, 
July 15. Two sittings have been 
planned - one at 5 p.m., the 
other at 6 p.m. - in order to 
accommodate everyone. The 
Milton Band, directed by Ken 



Lodge, will entertain from the 
pavilion at 7 p.m. 

The Fountain Photo Club will 
visit Fuller Rose Gardens, in Rye 
Beach, N.H., Saturday, July 20. 
The bus will leave at 10:30 a.m. 
A luncheon will be served at 
Jerry's Restaurant in Hampton. 
On Friday, July 26, a bus will 
leave at 8:30 a.m. for Onset 
where passengers will board the 
"Onset Vacationer". A 
three-hour cruise off the Cape 
Cod Canal is planned. Everyone 
should bring a picnid lunch. 

The movie "Carousel" will be 
presented on Monday, July 29 at 
7:30 p.m. in the auditorium. 
The two-hour film stars Shirley 
Jones and Gordon McRae. 



HANOVER 

BEAUTY SCHOOL 

■NOW ACCEPTING APPLICATIONS 
FOR OUR JULY 
DAY OR EVENING CLASSES 
FULL OR PART TIME 



CALL OR WRITE FOR BROCHURE 
24 COTTAGE AVE.. QUINCY 471-1673. 




At Quincy City Hospital 
June 27 

Mr. and Mrs. Allan Spaur, 19 
Yardarm Lane, a son. 

Mi. and Mrs. Kevin 
McDonough, 683 Sea St., a 
daughter. 

June 29 

Mr. and Mrs. Michael Lewis, 
41 Taffrail Road, a daughter. 

Mr. and Mrs. Charles Reid, 59 
East Elm Ave., a daughter. 

July 1 

Mr. and Mrs. Michael 
Dunning, 289 Beach St.. a 
daughter. 

Mr. and Mrs. Steven Kelly, 
109 Robertson St.. a daughter. 

Julys 

Mr. and Mrs, Arthur Ceurvels, 
67 Sealund Road, a daughter. 

Mr. and Mrs. William D. 
Dennis, 30 Lawrence St., a 
daughter. 

Mr. and M/s. David A. 
Kaufman, 415 Nowport Ave., a 
daughter. 

At St. Margaret's Hospital 

June 27 

Mr. and Mrs. William Ward, 43 
White St., a son. 

June 30 

Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Ridge, 20 
Lafayette St., a daughter. 

July 1 

Mr. and Mrs. Thomas 
McNamara, 17 Ocean St., a son. 

Scituate Arts 
Winners 

Two Quincy residents were 
among the previewed winners of 
the 7th Annual Scituate Arts 
Festival sponsored by the 
Scituate Arts Association. 

Paul Fortin of 134 School St., 
Quincy won second prize in 
Juried Photography. He 
submitted an untitled, black and 
white photograph contrasting a 
forboding, darksome sky with a 
smooth, white stretch of sand. 
Fortin's prize was $25. 

Doris Ferrara of 9 Aberdeen 
Rd, Squantum received an 
honorable mention for a mixed 
medium painting of red peppers 
and pink anemones. 




ENGAGED -- Mr. and Mrs. Joseph M. Campbell of 112 Mollis St., 
North Quincy, announce the engagement of their daughter, Maureen 
Anne, to Paul J. Welch, son of Mr. and Mrs. John E. Welch of 39 
Sunnyside Rd, Quincy. Miss Campbell is a graduate of North Quincy 
High School and works for the Boston Gas Co. Mr. Welch also is a 
graduate of North Quincy High School and is employed by New 
England Tel. and Tel. A March 1 wedding is planned. 

[Pagar Studio] 

Historical Society Tea At 
Adams Birthplaces July 14 



The Quincy Historical Society 
will hold its Annual Tea and 
Open House at the Adams 
Birthplaces Sunday, July 14 
from 3 to 5 p.m. 

This traditional event has 
been held for many years on the 
Sunday nearest the birthday of 
John Quincy Adams which falls 
on July 11. 

In recognition of the joint 
operation of the historic red 
farmhouses on Franklin St. by 
the Historical Society and the 
City of Quincy, City officials 
and their wive? are specially 
invited to this event. Invitations 
have also been sent to the 
presidents of neighboring 
historical societies. This year the 
Weymouth Historical Society 
wi!! be participating with the 



Quincy Historical Society. 

Miss Vera Call is in charge of 
arrangements for the tea, 
assisted, as is customary, by the 
lady members of the Society's 
Board of Curators and the wives 
of the men on the Board. 

The Birthplaces have been 
open to the pubhc as historic 
shrines since 1897. They have 
been owned by the City of 
Quincy since 1940 when they i 
were deeded to the City by the 
Adams family. Quincy Historical 
Society owns the contents of the 
houses, and has operated the 
John Quincy Adams Birthplace 
since 1897 and the John Adams 
Birthplace since 1950. 



The event will be 
regardless of the weather. 



held 



Mr., Mrs. Kevin Kelly Parents Of Son 



Mr. and Mrs. Kevin M. Kelly 
of 175 Elmwood Ave., 
Wollaston announce the birth of 
their son bom May 24 at St. 
Elizabeth's Hospital, Boston.' 



Grandparents are Mr. and Mrs. 
John L. Kelly, Jr. of 357 Chelsea 
St., East Boston and Mr. and 
Mrs. Stephen J. Garvey Sr., of 
16 Fairlawn Ave., Milton. 



lEMlMBU WHIH? 





PHOTO cock i haV OF THOMAS CRANE PUBLIC LIBRARY 



...This is how Ocean Street in 
North Quincy looked while 
many new homes were being 
built. 

REMEMBER WHEN 

...You were not just a Policy 
Number and retained your 
own identity, when personal 
service was always given ... It 
still is at ... 



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Quincy Sons Of Italy 
Social Center 

120 Quarry St., Quincy 

Newest function hall now available for weddings showers, dinner, 
dancer Two tastefully decorated halls: The Venetian Room has 

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Thursday, July 1 1 , 1974 Quincy Sun Pige 5 




ENGAGED - Mrs. Irene M. Vitagliano of 22 Ocean St., North 
Quincy, announces the engagement of her daughter, Andrea M., to 
Dikran Yakubian, son of Mrs. Haykanus Yakubian of Mt. Auburn 
St., Watertown. Miss Vitagliano is a graduate of North Quincy High 
School and attended Quincy Junior College. She is a legal secretary 
with the law firm of Choate, Hall and Stewart. Mr. Yakubian was 
educated In schools In Amaysa, Turkey. A Nov. 2 wedding is 
planned. 

Wollaston Juniors Plan 
Several July Activities 



The Wollaston Juniors have a 
number of activities planned for 

July. 

Tonight [Thursday] at 8:30 
p.m. an executive board meeting 
will be held at the home of Mrs. 
Robert Dunphey, 43 Carruth 
St., Wollaston.' Co-hostesses will 
be Mrs. Richard DelGrosso and 
Mrs. Maryanne Murphy. 

A Hayride for mothers and 
children v/ill be held July 17 
from 1 1 a.m. to noon. Meeting 
time is at 10:30 a.m. at the Lazy 
S Ranch, 300 Randolph St., 
Canton. Proceeds will benefit 
the International Affairs 
Committee. 

Mrs. Frederick T. Flukes is 



chairman and she will be assisted 
by Mrs. Charles Fellows and Mrs. 
Barry Whelpley. Those 
interested in attending are asked 
to call Mrs. Flukes for 
reservations. 

A Night at the Music Circus in 
Cohasset to see the Sandler and 
Young Show with Myron Cohen 
will be held July 23 at 8:30 p.m. 

The evening will benefit 
children with Learning 
Disabilities. 

Chairman is Mrs. Maryanne 
Murphy, who is assisted by Mrs. 
Gerald Rossi and Mrs. Allan 
Sarruda. Those interested in 
attending are asked to call Mrs. 
Murphy for reservations. 



Ann Trifone Receives 
Degree From Tufts 



Ann Louise Trifone received 
her B.A. in Foreign Languages 
from Tufts University, 
graduating magna cum laude. 

She is the daughter of Mr. and 
Mrs. Pasquale.J. TrifQ.ne..Qf 97. 
Lawson Rd, Scituate, formerly 
of Quincy. 

Ann completed the required 
four-year course of studies at 



Jackson College, womens' 
division of Tufts, in three years. 
She was on the Dean's List 
during her entire college career. 

In the fall, Ann will attend 
Johns Hopkins University 
School of Law and Diplomacy in 
Washington, D.G. wehre she will 
pursue her master's degree. Ann 
is one of 17 women selected for 
the 200-membeT program. 




^ FASHION SHOPPE 

7^ 1538 Hancock St., Quincy 



Dresses - Pantsults 
Sportswear - Sizes 8 To 20 

Mon, thru Sat. 10 to 5 

Thurs. & Fri. til 9 773-4748 




Marriage 
Intentions 




.%^r^§fei^^^^^ 



Peter E. Dodwell, 55 Cornish 
St., Weymouth, accountant; 
Kathleen M. McHugh, 31 
Dixwell Ave., Quincy, teacher. 

John Pisciottoli, 370 Green 
St., Weymouth, teacher; Elaine 
P. Daly, 135 Willard St., Quincy, 
teacher. 

Michael F. Finn, 60 Houston 
Ave., Milton, woodworker; Jean 
P. Bast, 20 Fort St., Quincy, 
waitress. 

Steven P. Harris, 24 Rogers 
Circle, Braintree, teacher; 
Colleen M. Corcoran, 1193 
Furnace Brook Parkway, 
Quincy, teacher. 

James V. McLaughlin, 26 S. 
Marshall St., Hartford, Conn., 
import specialist; Barbara A. 
Beatson, 231 Common St., 
Quincy, teacher. 

Herbert Kendall 

Pomona Grange 

Master 

Herbert Kendall was elected 
master of the Blue HUls Pomona 
Grange at its recent meeting in 
the Brookville Grange Hall. 
Other officers elected were: 
Mrs. Elsie Gorman, overseer; 
Mrs. Dorothy Kendall, lecturer; 
Melvin Wesley, steward; William 
Morrison, assistant steward; Mrs. 
Lillian Wall; lady assistant 
steward; Mrs. Helen McCue, 
chaplain; Robert G. Berry, 
treasurer. 

Mrs. Alice Curtis, secretary; 
Danny Ward, gatekeeper; Mrs. 
Ehzabeth Trevains, Ares; Mrs. 
Linda Ward, Pomona; Mrs. 
Pauline Sullivan, Flora; Mrs. Elva 
Robbins, executive committee 
for three years. 

Reports on agriculture, 
conservation and legislation were 
read by Mrs. Mary Hayward, 
Mrs. Anna Taylor and John 
Zampine respectively. 

Special guests were Deputy 
Ashley' Blanchard, Deputy 
Robert Pike, Deputy Robert 
Sweet and John Gorman, 
chairman of the Agricultural 
Service Committee. 

Donations of $25 each will be 
made to the Heifer Fund and the 
Massachusetts Educational Aid 
Fund. 

Lecturer Mrs. Dorothy 
Kendall will attend the lecturer's 
conference at the University of 
New Hampshire Aug. 19-24. 

Danny Ward will be the 
delegate to the Youth 
Leadership School July 28 to 
Aug. 3 -at Nichols College in 
Dudley. 

New officers will be installed 
Sept. 7 in Brookville Grange 
Hall. 



PERMANENT 
REP.10VAL 



UNWANTED 



EMI 



MARLENE 
MELAMED RE. 

Registered and Licensed 
Electrologist 
1151 Hancock St. 
Quincy 
By Appointment only 

Call 773-1330 
1()RMi:hi.v 




MARRIED - Mrs. David Braunels is the fornier Delphlna Ann 
Fontana, daughter of Mrs. Dean M. Jackson of 20 Blossom Lane, 
Weymouth. Her husband is the son of Mr. and Mrs. Frederick 
Brauneis of 64 Ovington Rd, Falmouth. They were married June 22 
in St. John's Church, Quincy. Mrs. Brauneis is a graduate of Quincy 
High School. Mr. Brauneis is a graduate of Upper Cape Regional 
Vocational Technical High School and is employed as a mechanic. 
After a wedding trip to Florida, the couple will live in Falmouth. 

[The Noursesl 

Elizabeth Trevains Elected 
Blue Hills Assn. President 



Mrs. Elizabeth Trevains was 
elected president of the Blue 
HUls Masters and Lecturers 
Association at its recent meeting 
in the Fore River Grange Hall. 

Mrs. Christine Curley was 
named vice president; Mrs. Ethel 
Warner, chaplain; Mrs. Sadie 
Wesley, secretary; Mrs. Pauline 
Sullivan, treasurer; Melvin 
Wesley, program director; Mrs. 
Lillian Wall, executive 
committee for three years. 

They will he installed Sept. 16 
at 8 p.m. 

Mrs. Gertrude Paakonen and 
Mr. and Mrs. Theodore Johnson 



were welcomed as new members. 

Mrs. Lillian Wall presided and 

Mrs. Elva Robbins was pianist. 

The Association's annual 
outing will be held July 14 at 11 
a.m. at Grays Beach, Kingston. 
In case of rain, it will be 
postponed until July 21. 



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WRITE: Director of Admissions at above address 
Resident Facilities Available in nearby private homes. 



Page 6 Quincy Sun Thursday, July 1 1 , 1974 



Magazine a good gift 



By RIV TOBIN 

Dear Mrs. Tobin: 

My grandson is 12 years old 
and is returning to the United 
States after having lived in 
South America where his par- 
ents are missionaries. I'd like 
to give him a "welcome 
home" gift, but have no idea 
what to buy. I have never seen 
him and always sent money to 
his mother to buy him suitable 
gifts there. Please give me an 
idea for something that would 
please him. 

Donna McM. 

Dear Donna: 

How about a subscription to 
Boys' Life. It's published 
monthly by the Boy Scouts of 
America. 

Dear Mrs. Tobin: 

Our 30-year-old daughter 
was recently divorced and has 
come home to live with us. 
When we are invited to a par- 
ty should we tell our hostess 
we have a "house guest"? 

Mr. and Mrs. Folks 

Dear Folks: 

No. Your friends will soon 
learn about the addition to 



your household and if they 
want to include your daughter 
they will. She should be mak- 
ing friends in her own age 
group and not toddling along 
with her parents. 

Dear Mrs. Tobin: 

'We are not Jewish but 
friends have invited us to 
their daughter's Bas Mitzvah. 
We're not exactly sure what a 
Bas Mitzvah is or what will be 
expected of us. 

The Johnsons 

Dear Johnsons: 

A Bas Mitzvah is a cere- 
mony held for a Jewish girl 
when she is 12 or 13 years old 
and assumes religious re- 
sponsibilities. A Bar Mitzvah 
is given for a boy. It is a beau- 
tiful service and nothing will 
be expected of you in the way 
of participation. The Bas 
Mitzvah girl is usually given a 
gift of money, jewelry or the 
ever popular fountain pen. 
(She probably will receive 
three!) 1 expect you have 
been invited to the reception 
afterward. Congratulate the 
young lady and thank her par- 
ents for inviting you. 



To-dftfjlWomeri 



ONCE OVER LIGHTLY 

Daughter told of a visitor 



By ANN RUDY 

Because we have an- 
nounced our daughter's en- 
gagement, I thought it only 
fitting that I take the girl 
aside and tell her a few facts 
of life. 

I'll admit I've been remiss 
in this respect, but you know 
how mothers are. I mean, it's 
only natural to want to shield 
a young girl from as much as 
possible. 

Besides, the facts I had to 
tell her she'd have no use for 
anyway unless she was mar- 
ried. So we sat down together 
in the living room over a pot of 
tea and I told her to make her- 
self as comfortable as she 
could because what I had to 
tell her might cause her to 
swoon. 

"Go ahead, mother," she 



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Holbrook: Tues. — Fri. noon— 7 p.m.; Sat. 9 a.m.— 2 p.m. 
Wareham: Tues. — Fri. 10 a.m.— 6 p.m.; Sat. 9 a.m. — 1 p.m. 
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It may come as a great shock, 
instructed, so I launched right 



in. 

"It nnay come as a great 
shock to you," I said, "but af- 
ter you have been married 
nine months or so you may 
have a visitor." 

She rolled her eyes heaven- 
ward and said, "Mother, 
come on!" 

I edged closer to her on the 
sofa and clutched her knee. 
"You must listen to me," I 
implored. "Nine months is 
just about how long it takes 
for a garbage disposer to 
break down from all the corn 
husks you'll probably stuff in- 
to it and then you will have to 
call a plumber. And his visit 
will cost you more than the 
honeymoon." 

Strangely enough, she 
seemed to relax. Even after I 
told her about steam irons 
that suddenly spray rusty wa- 

Brides drop $1,000 
on bedroom fixtures 

Newlyweds are spending 
more money these days on 
their bedroom furniture. 

According to a Tendex 
study, 1.7 million newlyweds 
spent an average of $994 
apiece for their bedrooms in 
1973. That works out to a total 
of $1.7 billion. — CNS 



ter instead of steam. 

Even after I warned her 
about what the underside of 
her cook top will look like 
when she lifts it to clean after 
three months of things boiling 
over. 

"Dried oatmeal and old egg 
whites," I told her, "are so 
hard to remove that when you 
find them you'd be better off 
to either move or paint them 
and pretend they are part of 
the appliance." 

By this lime I was trem- 
bling. It isn't easy for a moth- 
er to talk about such things — 
especially when I haven't 
looked under my own cook top 
for six months. 

But she was wonderful 
about it. 

"Mom," she said, putting 
her arm around my 
shoulders, "Thanks. I think 
I'm gonna make it." 

Wood is used 
in many shampoos 

People use wood for many 
things — including washing 
their hair. 

Chemically treated wood 
byproducts form an ingredi- 
ent of shampoos, according to 
the National Forest Products 
Association. — CNS 




•T"7Tnr i nnnn iii » i m ni>nni HM j uuuu 



FIND A FLOAT 



Suppose you see someone fall 
into the water and begin shouting 
for help. You're not a good 
swimmer. What can you do? 
There's no ring, life buoy or other 
aid in sight - or is there? 

Usually there is. How about a 
vacuum jug, or an ice chest with a 
clamp-on lid? A canoe paddle? A 
fallen branch from a tree? And 
don't forget that spare tire in the 
trunk of your car. 

These and dozens of other 
commonplace objects have one 
important, lifesaving 
characteristic - they float, and a 
floating object can save a 
drowning person. 

Many of the 5,000 victims who 
drow;i annually in water-related 
accidents could be saved by the 



use of improvised flotation aids. 
Just keep in mind that lots of 
things float - and not every 
lifesaver has to look like one. 



* * * 



This information has been 
brought to you as a public service 
by NABORHOOD PHARMACY, 
406 Hancock St,, No, Quincy. 

OUR SERVICES INCLUDE: 

24 hour emergency service, 
Charge accounts, 
Family prescription recordi, 
Year end tax records. 
Delivery service. 
Insurance receipts. 
Hospital supplies for safe or rent. 
Open 7 days a week, 8-10. 
Phone: 773-6426. 



'wwiwiau, 



***^*ir'f^f'f*^«**tf^hM<^\'^et ^M ie *0« ^ * > e* *»» i m fmtk 



Your Horoscope Guide 



For The Week of July 14-20 
By GINA, Copley News Service 

For more complete forecast, read indications for your 
Ascendant sign plus Birth sign. To find your Ascendant sign, 
count ahead from Birth sign the number of signs indicated. 



Time of Birth: 


Probalile Asrendant is: 


4 to 6 a.m. 


Same as birth sign 


6 to 8 a.m. 


First sign following 


8 to 10 a.m. 


Second sign following 


10 to 12 Noon 


Third sign following 


Noon to 2 p.m. 


Fourth sign following 


2 to 4 p.m. 


Fiuh sign following 


4 to 6 p.m. 


Sixth sign following 


6 to 8 p.m. 


Seventh sign following 


8 to 10 p.m. 


Eighth sign following 


10 to Midnight 


Ninth sign following 


Midnight to 2 a.m. 


Tenth sign following 


2 to 4 a.m. 


Eleventh sign following 



ARIES: (March 21 to April 

19 — Also Aries Ascendant) — 
Blocks and delays lift now and 
you can operate with greater 
ease. Concentrate attention 
on details of money matters. 
Stick to your budget — curb 
extravagance. Issues involv- 
ing residence must be re- 
solved now. 

TAURUS: (April 20 to May 

20 — Also Taurus Ascendant) 

— You can solve yoiu" prob- 
lems now with surprising 
ease. Your popularity is high 
so enlist the support from 
others you need this week. 
Think over past ideas as they 
could apply to a new project 
begun now. 

GEMINI: (May 21 to June 
20 — Also Gemini Ascendant) 

— Your energy appears 
somewhat low now, but you 
will have to "produce." 
Others make demands which 
must be met. An important 
decision must be made and 
some sort of deadline met. 
Concentrate carefully. 

CANCER: (June 21 to July 
22 — Also Cancer Ascendant) 

— Pull your attention away 
from the past — what is 
ended. Look optimistically to- 
ward new beginnings. If sepa- 



First woman driver 
raced in 1899 

The first known woman 
driver in the United States 
was Genevra Delphine 
Mudge. 

She drove an electric-pow- 
ered car in New York in 1898 
and raced in a gasoline vehi- 
cle the next year. — CNS . 



rations occiir, know that you 
are released for new experi- 
ence. Be realistic and face the 
facts. Cooperate. 

LEO: (July 23 to August 22 

— Also Leo Ascendant) — 

Busy, busy, busy character- 
izes this week. Old projects 
and new plans, all cry for at- 
tention. Matters at a distance 
appear important now. Popu- 
larity is high and social life 
expands. Settle a matter with 
compromise. 

VIRGO: (August 23 to Sept. 
22 — Also Virgo Ascendant ) — 
Associating with a partner in 
a business venture appears 
possible. You impress those in 
high positions very positively. 
You're sharp now regarding 
finances. Some confusion sur- 
rounds a romantic attraction. 

UBRA: (Sept. 23 to Oct. 22 

— Also Libra Ascendant) — 

With so many "irons in the 
fire" it is possible that errors 
will occur. Keep the new, 
powerful "you" under control 
and be careful not to "use" 
others. Use finesse and charm 
in dealing with difficult supe- 
riors. 

SCORPIO: (Oct. 23 to Nov. 
21 — Also Scorpio Ascendant) 



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— A time to begin new proj- 
ects in personal life and work 
areas. You'll work best on the 
sidelines rather than at the 
center of activity. Bring har- 
mony in domestic life by gentr 
ly leading instead of com- 
manding. 

SAGITTARIUS: (Nov. 22 to 
Dec. 21 — Also Sagittarius As- 
cendant) — Work at your top 
form now to meet and conquer 
competition. Be self-confident 
and maintain a positive atti- 
tude. A financial deal involv- 
ing property makes you tense 
but should turn out well. 

CAPRICORN: (Dec. 22 to 
Jan. 19 — Also Capricorn As- 
cendant) — Financial or tax 
matters can be solved and 
agreements reached now. A 
major success in business can 
be achieved through coopera- 
tive efforts. Some conflict be- 
tween professional life and 
domestic life defies compro- 
mise. 

AQUARIUS: (Jan. 20 to 
Feb. 18 — Also Aquarius As- 
cendant) — Be meticulously 
truthful now and refrain 
from gossip or idle comments. 
Be patient, observe, and don't 
jump to conclusions without 
all the facts. Be creative — in- 
vest in your personal ability 
and talents. 

PISCES: (Feb. 19 to March 
20 — Also Pisces Ascendant) 

— Now is the time to get your 
idea packaged and merchan- 
dised. Financing should be 
available if needed. Oppor- 
tunities for increased income 
are around you. Make con- 
tacts — take action. Romance 
is highlighted. 



Thursday. July 11 , 1974 Quincy Sun Page 7 

HOLLYWOOD HOTLINE 

Kamel attracts 
night fans too 



By NANCY ANDERSON 
Copley News Service 

HOLLYWOOD - Though 
Stanley Kamel plays (in his 
words) "a compassionate 
young writer" in the soaper 
"Days of Our lives," he's 
played so many meanies in 
guest roles on other shows 
that he reports, "My nieces 
and nephews keep saying, 
'They got Uncle Stanley 
again,' as I'm led off into the 
sunset in handcuffs. I'd like to 
play something more sympa- 
thetic for a change." 

Meanwhile, though, he's de- 
veloped such a following 
through his daytime televi- 
sion career that, when Actors 
and Others for Animals held 
its annual money-raiser at the 
Burbank Studio, fans raced 
right by night-time stars to 
pounce on Stanley. 

Kamel joyously admits that 
daytime viewers are numer- 
ous and ardent as he discov- 
ered once when performing a 
guest role in a "Mannix" epi- 
sode. 

"We were out on location 
somewhere," he cheerily re- 
lates, "and the very police- 
men posted on duty to keep 
the public away grabbed me 
to ask, 'You didn't really rape 
that girl, did you, Eric?' 

"They ignored Mike Con- 
nors and other big stars there, 
because, they said, their 
wives watch 'Days of Our 
Uves.'" 

(Incidentally, the police 
weren't asking about rape in 
pursuance of crime. They 
were seeking reassurance 
about a soap opera favorite.) 



While Stanley's private life 
may not be so interesting as 
"Days of Our Lives," his love 
life is interesting enough, be- 
cause he's madly in love with 
an IsraeU combat veteran. 

A wMnan, of course. 

"I'm 31 and she's 43," Stan- 
ley says, "so I probably 
should be going with someone 
her daughter's age. 

"But, compared with her, 
young girls just aren't inter- 
esting. 

"She's fought with the Isra- 
eli army. She speaks five lan- 
guages. She's a gourmet cook. 

"Young girls are all right, 
but this woman is 
marvelous!" 

Yet, despite such enthusi- 
asm, Kamel doesn't plan 
marriage. Not for the mo- 
ment, at least. 



MICHELANGELO 

COIFFURES 

572 Columbian St. 

South Weymouth 

335-9668 




announce 
thof 



MISS ERIKA 

formerly of a 
Quincy Salon 

HAS JOINED 
OUR STAFF 



There's a fuel- 
conserving, time-saving, 

convenient way to do 

oH your bani<ing. 

Bank with us. 

Now, especially, you need the Hancock Bank - a full-service 
bank that can take care of a// your banking requirements: 
checking accounts, savings accounts, Maxi Statement, HOW 
Accounts, Government Check Banking Plan, Certificates of 
Deposit, personal loans, car loans, home improvement 
loans, mortgages, safe deposit boxes. 
Travelers Cheques, money 
orders. Master Charge, 
you name it. 

And we can take 
care of all your 
banking require- 
ments by mail — we ^ 
pay the postage! 

Call or visit. Our ^ 
people will be happy 
to serve you. 




^0M£ GROW WITH ^^ 





The Money Tree Bank 



ii HANCOCK BANK 

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^S. of Boston Quincy 7730500 Norwood 769-1300 



Memt)er F D I C 



mm 



Page 8 Quincy Sun Thursday. Jujy 1 1 . 1974 




CHANGING HANDS - Newly-installed president George Riley 
[left] accepts the Quincy Lion's Club gavel from out-going president 
Everett Tatreau. 

George Riley Installed 
Lions Club President 



George Riley of 109 Faxon 
Lane, Quincy, was installed as 
president of Quincy Lions Club 
at the Annual Installation and 
Lady's Dinner Dance recently at 
the Neighborhood Club, 

He succeeds Everett Tatreau 
of Quincy. 

During the evening Joseph N. 
Ricciardi of Scituate was named 
Lion of the Year. He is district 
manager of Quincy's office at 
the John Hancock Insurance 
Company. Ricciardi was also 
installed as the club's secretary. 

Other officers installed were 



Roger Perfetti, Braintree, first 
vice-president; William 
O'Connell, Duxbury, second 
vice-president; John Swanson, 
Weymouth, third vice-president; 

Alexander Smith, Plymouth, 
treasurer; William Shea, 
Squantum, tail twister; and 
Golumbo Cherubini, lion tamer. 

Installed as directors were 
Matthew McDonnell, Quincy; 
Joseph Kopovsky, Milton; 

Arthur Gillis, Weymouth; 
Edward Deenen, Quincy; Leroy 
Rounseville, Quincy and 
Norman Jacoby of Brookline. 



Prasantra K. Mitra, M.D. 

announces the opening of his 
Office for the Prbctice of 

Urology and Sterility 

at 67 Coddington St., Quincy 

Beginning July 1, 1974 

Hours by appointment Phone 773-2677 




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HEATING 



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MONTH OF JULY SPEQALS 




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Appointments cv Walk-in setvice - Open Thursday evenings 




Abundant Early Summer Crops 
May Bring Lower Prices 



The bounty of early summer 
is evident now, reports the 
Massachusetts Department of 
Agriculture [MDA], with ample 
supplies of just about all of the 
vegetables grown in the Bay 
State. 

There may even be some price 
reductions at farm stands and 
produce counters. 

Zucchini squash, native green 
cabbage, chicory and escarole, 
beets, Boston, romaine and salad 
bowl lettuce, radishes and 
green-house tomatoes are to be 
found in good quantities, all 
harvested from nearby farms. 

G reenhouse-grown, 
vine-ripened tomatoes are 
especially noteworthy this week, 
having been quite scarce in the 
market until now. This delicious 



Massachusetts specialty - plump, 
bright red, and identified by the 
bright green stem left intact - 
appears to be dropping in price, 
and well worth looking for. 

Native Savoy and Chinese 
cabbage are in good supply. The 
Savoy has a curly leaf, is 
considerably more tender than 
the green cabbage, and is 
excellent for cooking. Chinese 
cabbage is straight and white, 
with stalks like celery, and 
makes a fine salad. 

Native green beans are starting 
to come to market, but prices at 
the moment will be on the high 
side. 

Locally-grown sweet corn 
should show up before the end 
of the month, and the crop 
should be a very good one. Corn 



on the market right now is from 
Florida, Delaware, North 
Carolina and New Jersey. Some 
of it is of excellent quality. ..but 
nothing can compare to the 
flavor and quality of native corn, 
fresh-picked and cooked while 
only a few hours old. 

Only extreme weather - hot or 
cold - will delay the local corn 
crop. 

Though we have had some 
peculiar weather hereabouts, 
with June going into the records 
as well below normal in 
temperature, our native crops 
are doing well, and are 
reasonably "on schedule", says 
the MDA. ..and our native 
abundance should make eating a 
bit easier on the wallet, as well 
as happier on the taste buds. 



COOL TIPS FOR HOT WEATHER 



Heat and humidity affect 
some people more than oth- 
ers. But when the T-H-I 
(temperature humidity in- 
dex) climbs into the seven- 
ties almost all of us begin to 




N.O.W.: 

Get it 

from 
Colonial 
Federal. 

We've got it— 

theJ\[.O.W. 
Account. 

It's better than a checking 
account because it pays 
interest from day of deposit to 
day of withdrawal -at 5% 
annually, compounded 
monthly. 

You can pay your bills with a 
N.O.W. Account by writing 
negotiable orders of 
withdrawal, making them 
payable to anyone— just like 
checks. 

Each draft you write costs only 
15 cents, and when they're 
cashed at Colonial Federal, 
they're free. 

N.O.W. For 
Experience. 

If you're 62 or older. Colonial 
Federal gives you N.O.W. For 
Experience— a free N.O.W. 
Account. 

Colonial 
^Federal 
if^ Savfags 

And Loan Association 
of Quincy 

15 Beach Stre« 

Wollaston 

Te«. 471-0750 

VNote: $10 must remain in ) 
account to be paid interest^^X 



suffer. Here, then, are some 
reminders of time-tested tips 
to help take the sizzle out 
of summer. 

• Keep shades and blinds 
drawn when windows are in 
direct sunlight. 

• Turn off any un-needed 
lights. Burning blubs add to 
the heat in a room. 

• Avoid tight fitting, high- 
necked clothing. Light, 
loosely fitted clothes allow 
air to circulate. 

• Drink plenty of liquids 
to replace the fluid lost 
through perspiration. 

• Remember that iced 
tea is one of nature's best 
hot weather beverages be- 
cause it is non-sweet, non- 
carbonated and won't build 
up another thirst soon after 
drinking. 

• Cut down on the use 
of heat-producing appli- 
ances. Barbecue outdoors in- 



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stead of using the kitchen 
range. 

• Take tepid showers 
rather than icy-cold ones. 
And pat yourself dry in- 
stead of rubbing vigorously. 

• Stay away from heat 
producing foods such as 
fats. Eat plenty of summer's 
fruits and vegetables. 

• Wear a floppy brimmed 
hat to keep the sun's rays 
off your face and neck. Or 
borrow great-grandmama's 
idea and carry a parasol. 




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Thunday . July 1 1 . 1974 Quincy Sun Pifc 9 



Parade Winners Listed 

Congressman Burke 
Presents Flag To 
Adams Shore Association 



The Adams Shore Community 
Association's July 4th 
celebration was highlighted by a 
visit by Congressman James A. 
Burke. 

Burke was the featured 
speaker at a morning flag raising 
ceremony at O'Hara Circle and 
presented committee chairman, 
Paul Harold, with a flag for the 
association. The flag had been 
flown over thje U.S. Capitol in 
Washington in the name of the 
Adams Shore Community 
Association. 

Mayor Walter Hannon, 
Senator Arthur Tobin, Rep. 
Thomas Brownell and 
Councillors Leo Kelly and 
Clifford Marshall were also 
present. Deputy Sheriff John 
Brownell of the Bryan VFW Post 
was color guard, assisted by Boy 
Scout Mark Foley. Rev. Kenneth 
Miner of the Adams Shore 
Community Church gave the 
prayer. 

Assisting at the flag ceremony 
were Blue Birds, Christine Cefail, 
Linda Cefail, Kelley MacKeil, 
Carol Lynch, Natalie Nigro, 
Christine Donovan, Michelle 
Holbrook and Ann Marie Shea; 
Brownie Sharon Solomon and 
Cub Scouts Brian Donovan, 
Bobby Cardillo and Brian Foley, 

Later in the morning citations 
introduced by Sen. Arthur 
Tobin and Councillor Leo Kelly 
were presented to R. Cady 
Loud, one of the oldest residents 
of Adams Shore and long-time 
active in the community 
association. 

Various parade contest 
winners were: 

Doll carriage parade - first 
prizes, Maryann Dennis, Jimmy 
Dennis and Suzanne Shea; 
second prize, Deanna Nigro, 
third prizes to Maureen Donovan 
and Jana Nordstrom. 

Costume parade, ages 1-7 - 
first prize Maureen Shea; second 
prizes, Tracy O'Donnell and 
Jody O'Donnell; third prize, 
Amy Donahue. 

Costume parade ages 7 and up 
- first prizes, Patty Murray, 
Marianne Murray and Donna 
Picot, second prize, Gary 
MacNeil; third prizes, Donna 



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Marcin, Janet McLaughlin and 
Jackie McLaughlin. 

Adult division winners were 
Harry Graham and Debbie 
Nigro. 

Parade judges were Mrs. John 
O'Hara, Mrs. William Duane and 
Mr. and Mrs. Bartholomew 
O'Leary. 

The committee comprised 
Debbie Nigro, Carol Bonderick, 
Leo Donovan, Bob Nordstrom, 
Barbara Bellew, Nancy O'Brien, 
Bill Perch, John Johnston, 
Harvey and Rhoda Solomon, Peg 
Thornton, Gerry Shea, Clara 
Cardillo, Kathy Donovan and 
Rev. Kenneth Miner. 




HORRIBLES PARADE brought out a variety cf costumed clad contestants at the Adams Shore 
Comnfiunity Association's sponsored event. 



Massachusetts Electric people 
want to answer all your questions 

about electric bills. 




Judith Fantdsij 
Senior Clerk 



It's onh' nntuttil. BeccUist', aftor all, our 
270G employoes aro just as amcornod 
abtnit rising electric bills as our 633,0(K) 
cusloiners. Thoy pay the same electric 
rate and fuel adjustment charge yi>u do. 

That's why we've compiled a list of the 
10 c]uestions the\' are asked most fre- 
quentl)', ti>gether with brief answers to 
gi\e you a better idea oi w here things 
stand. 

If you have a question of \i>ur own 
that is not answered here, ask a Massa- 
chusetts Electric empknee for an answer. 
Call the office nearest you or, if you 
prefer, siniph' mail us the attached 
coupon. 

Q. Why has my electric bill gone up in 
recent months? 
A. The a\erage resi- 
dential electric bill 
for a customer 
using .^tX) kilowatt 
hours a month 
went from $17.^)2 
inMav \'')7Mo 
$23.73 in May 1974. 
Approximately 
$l.()2t)f this increase 
reflects basic rate increases rex'iewed and 
approved by the Department of Public 
Utilities. The remaining $4.79 of the 
increase in the average residential bill is 
the result of higher fuel adjustment 
charges during the same period. This is 
duetotheastriMiomical rise in the cost of 
residual fuel i>il used to generate nearl\' 
70' i ofourelectricitw 
Q. Why doesn't the electric company pay 
for these fuel cost increases instead of 
passing them along to their customers? 
A. Since September 1973, residual fuel 
oil costs ha\e gone up fnim $3.44 to over 
$1 1 .00a barrel c>ra total of nn)re than 
$220,000,000 annually for our S\'stem. 
N This is more than 
6 times our annual 
earnings and, with- 
c)Ut the fuel adjust- 
ment charge, your 
electric company 
would be unable to 
pay its bills and 
remain in business 
more than 60 days. 
Q. Who gets the 
fuel adjustment charge on my electric bill? 
A. 1007( of the fuel adjustment charge is 
paid directly to our fuel suppliers and 
your electric company diK^sn't make a 
penny's worth of profit on it. 
Q. If fuel costs go down, will my electric 
bill go down, too? 




lohnS. Bjiiufiik 
I ii'kl In^int'cr 




Doug Clough 
LinenunHlCljss 



A. Yes. The fuel adjustment charge pro- 
tects both you and your electric company 
against rapid fuel cost changes. When 
fuel costs go down, your fttel adjustment 
charge will lUitoiiinHoilhi go down, too. 
Q. Are fuel costs higher here in New Eng- 
land than in other parts of the country? 
A. Yes. Fuel costs in N'ew lingland haxe 
risen l39'/( since lheenerg\' crises began; 
this is about 3 tiniesthe national axerage. 
These energ\' costs are for oil, coal, and 
gas used to generate electricitv and not 
other energy costs. Legislation is needed 
to equalize New Hngland's energ\' costs. 
We have asked mu- Congressmen for 

help in putting us 
on an equal price 
footing with other 
areas. 

Q. What else is the 
electric company 
doing to reduce 
fuel costs? 
A./\ll that we can. 
by next I all, three- 
quarters of ourS\s- 
tem's fossil-fuel generating facilities will be 
modified to enable us to burn coal as well 
as oil. Given the go-ahead, we can begin 
to burn the lowest price coal and oil avail- 
able and still meet primar\' air quality 
standards. Amendments [o the Clean 
Air Act will enable us to use coal on a 
reasonable basis. The\' will also clear 
the vva\' for long term variances which 
will permit us to buy coal at more 

fax'orable prices. 
Q. What can I do to 
help lower my elec- 
tricbill? 

A. Yoiu" support of 
legislation which will 
enable us to achieve 
a reasonable balance 
between air i]ualit\ 
improvements, 
economic impact, 
,^nd a reliable supply (.)f energy is essen- 
tial in bringing fuel costs down. Given 
approval to burn coal for .t years and to 
arrange fiv e-vearcoal contracts, our sys- 
tem can save customers about $30 million 
per year. And, at current prices, we could 
saveal'>out$4 million a month through 
the reasonable use of higher sulfur fuel 
oil. 

Q. Would nuclear energy reduce the 
high cost of electricity? 
A. Yes. Though nuclear energy is now 
used to generate only about 20'/f of our 
electricity, this capacity saved New Eng- 
land customers between $40 and$70 mil- 





lion during Decem- 
ber, January and 
February alone. Elec- 
tricity generated by 
nuclear plants is not 
included in the fuel 
adjustment charge. 
However, it now 
takes up to 12 years 
to get a nuclear plant 
built and licensed 
foroperatii>n and legislation is required 
to help streamline the licensing process. 
Q. Why doesn't the electric company 
use the money they spend on advertising 
to reduce my bill? 

.A. Ihc total annual cost ol all newspaper, 
radio, telev isionand otheradv ertising 
amounts toaboutdOt'percustoiueror 
alxiut .Va month. \\V believe it essential 
to keepourciistomers informed of the 
latest dev elopments in the energy crises 
and to bring viHi up todateon our con- 
tinuing efforts to provide reliable service. 
Since May o\ 1972 iio)icotoiir(ii{irrli>iii\^ 
has been used to promc»te the increased 
usage t)felectricitv. 

Q. Have electric company profits gone 
up as a result of the energy crisis? 

A. No. To the con- 
trary, our System 
earnings for the 
twelve months 
through April, 1974 
came to $1.94 per 
isg share compared 
V with $2.39 per share 
ayearagiK Our first 
four months earn- 
ings for 1974 were 
(S7(f per share compared with $1.08 per 
share a year ago. 




ttH'KSSm 



Peler W. (ejns 
Engineering \ss\. 



r" 



Mrs. M.»r>;an*l Anders4)n 
SocreLirv 




MASSACHUSETTS 
ELECTRIC 



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Page 10 Quincy Sun Thursday, July 1 1 , 1974 



Merrymount Association Lists July 4th Contest Winners 



Winners of the various Fourth 
of July celebration contests 
sponsored by the Merry mount 
Association are announced by 
the committee. 

Among them were William 
Connolly, who won the road 
i.'ice and Carole Loughlin, 15, 
who was selected Miss 
Mcrrvmount. 

Connolly who lives on Furnace 
Brook Parkway and is a teacher 
in the Boston school system, was 
the overall winner of the 
Merrymount Association's first 
annual road race. 

Out of 56 starters, he finished 
the 2,4-mile race with an official 
time of 16:06 to take first place 
in the 14-30 age group. Second 
in the 14-30 group was Dave 
Previte [18:011, third was 
Michael Boyle. 

Paul Hussey, president of the 
Merrymount Association, 
finished second overall, and first 
in the men over-30 group with 
an official time of 16:58. 
Second was Dave Raftery 
[18:35] and third, Tom Collins 
[20;57J. 

Tom Connolly finished first in 
the boys 9-13 group with an 
official time of 18:09. Second 
was Bruce Tobin [ 18:36] , third, 
Dan Gorman (18:36:01). 

Cristine O'Brien finished first 



in the girls 9-13 group with an 
official time of 19:57. Second 
was Susie Seamans [20:00]; 
third, Jennifer Seamans 
[20:44]. 

Dottie Irvine was first in the 
girls 14-30 with 19:56. Second 
was Kelly Tobin [21:00]. First 
in the women's division was Gail 
Goodwin [23:59]. 

Carole Loughlin, 15, selected 
as Miss Merrymount, lives at 68 
Narragansett Rd, and is the 
youngest of five children. She 
will be a sophomore at Quincy 
High in the fall. Her future plans 
include a career in architecture 
with further studies at either 
Northeastern University or the 
University of Massachusetts. 

First runner up was Donna 
Madden 16, of Assabet Rd., 
second runner up was Susan 
Tolson, 14. of Narragansett Rd. 

Robbie Mitchell, four-year-old 
son of Mr. and Mrs. Robert 
Mitchell of Quincy Shore Drive, 
was chosen Master Merrymount. 
Pamela Norton, four-year-old 
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. 
Lawrence Norton of Sea St., was 
chosen Little Miss Merrymount. 

Winners in the Junior 
Olympics sponsored by the 
Merrymount Association were: 



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DASHES 

Girls Up to Age 5 - ( 1 1 Laura 
Jane Flavin, [2] Eileen 
McClosky, [3] Tie Maura 
O'Gara and Jennifer Raftery. 

6 and 7 years - [ 1 ] Roseann 
Cristiani, (21 Jennifer Cassidy, 
[3] Jackie Coleman. • 

8 and 9 years - [ 1 ] Joan 
Roche, (21 Krissy Kelly, [31 
Kathy Flaherty. 

1 and 1 1 years - [ 1 1 Lisa 
Cody. (21 Joan Lewis, (3] 
Suzanne Clarke. 

1 2 and 1 3 years - ( 1 ] Jennifer 
Seamans, [21 La.urie Clarke, [31 
Chris Cunniff. 

Boys up to Age 5 - [ 1] Eddie 
Flavin, [2] Billie Roche, [3] 
Michael Loughman. 

6 and 7 years - ( 1 1 John 
Cristiani, [21 Marty Tolson, [3] 
John Kelly. 

8 and 9 years - [11 Dave 
Coletti, [:[ Nicky Cristiani, [31 
Michael Callahan. 

10 and 1 1 years - ( 1 1 Jqe 
Irvine, [2[ Mike Cristiani, [31 
Jimmy Dunford. 

1 2 and 13 years - [ I [ Leon 
Fra/.ier, [21 Dave Lewis, (31 
Carroll Coletti. 

14 and 16 years - [11 Dave 
Raftery, [21 Peter Cassidy, [31 
Sieve Sullivan. 

BUDDY RACES 

Girls up to age 5 - [ 1 1 Michele 
llealy iind Jennifer Raftery. |2| 
Carolyn Kedd\ and Maura 
O'Gara, [3[ .MariVic Hscano aiul 
Eileen McClosky. 

6 and 7 - [ 1 | Jennifer Cassidy 
and Jackie Coleman. |2| Lee 
Roberts and Lee Wagiicr. |3| 
Jennifer Cioklen and Rebecca 
Sage. 

8 and 9 - |1 | Diane Raftcr\ 
and Jane Bramaii. [21 Ro.seanne 
Cristiani and Michele Ilcaly, |31 
Lena Cristiani and .Maigi 
Cristiani. 

10 and 11 - [1] Cns O'Brien 
and Carol Lynch, [21 Kathy 
Flynn and Nancy Tolson, [31 
Suzanne Clarke and Debbie 
McManus. 

12 and 13 - [ H Laurie Clarke 
and Jane Hanlon, (2] Chris 
Cunniff and Mary Loeb, [31 Sue 
Coleman and Diane Cirino. 

Boys up to age 5 - [ 1 1 Patrick 
Haddigan and David Hack, [2] 
Marty Cosgrove and Chros 
Goodwin, [3] Michael O'Brien 
and Kevin Flynn. 

6 and 7 - [ 1 1 Marty Tolson 
and John Kelly, [21 Vincent 
Cosgrove and Bruce Duffy, [31 
Timmy Flavin and Cliff llession. 
8 and 9 - [H Nicky Cristiani 
and Dave Coletti, [21 Mike 
Fowkes and Russ Leary, [3] 
Mike Molloy and Timmy Barry. 
10 and 11 - [1] Jimmy 
Dunform and Billy O'Neil, [2] 
Mike Barry and Danny Boyle, 
[3] Paul McConville and Danny 
Molloy. 

12 and 13 - [ 1 1 Dave Lewis 
and Tom Joe Connolly, [21 Bob 
Thompson and Ken Grinsteff, 
(31 Todd Veale and Carroll' 
Coletti. 

14 - 16 - [1] Dave Raftery 
and Mike Dunford, [21 Peter 
Cassidy and Steve Sullivan, [31 
Mike Boyle and Kevin 
McCarthy. 

WHEELBARROW 
Girls up to age 5 - [11 
Carolyn Keddy and Marua 
O'Gara, [21 MariVic Escana and 
Eileen McClosky, [3] Mary Ann 
McCole and Molly McDonough. 
6 and 7 - [ 1 1 Mia Gonzales 
and Beth Anderson, [21 Jennifer 
Cassidy and Jackie Coleman, [3] 
Jennifer Golden and Rebecca 
Sage. 

8 and 9 - [ 1] Diane Raftery 
and Jane Braman, (21 Maritess 
Escano and MaryKate 
McConville, [3] Kristin 
Loughman and Patty Hooley. 

10 and 11 - (Ij Joan Lewis 
and Kristin O'Gara, (2) Kathy 
Flynn and Nancy Tolson, [3) 
Pamela Noe and Tracy Palmer. 
12 and 13 - (1) Claire Lynch 
and Susan Tolson, [2] Marie 




CAKE FLOAT commemorating the 50th anniversary of the 

Merrymount Association was one of the eye-catchers in the 
association's July 4th parade and celebration. 

[Quincy Sun Photo by Laban Whittakerl 

16 - I !] Brian llahatv 



Cialiaghor anil Maureen Swantua, 
1 31 Chris ("unnitf and Mary 
Loeb. 

14 - lo - I I I Kell\ Tobin and 
Dottie Irvine. |2| .Susan 
DcKiaizo and Katli> DelCiai/t\ 
I .^ I ('liijs O'Brien and Jackie 
Burke tic Donna DcPietro and 
Patty Irvine. 

Boys up to age 5 - |l I Bruce 
Dulty and Vincent Cosgrove. 
I 2] Patrick Haddigan and David 
Hack. [31 Billic Roche and 
Bobb\ Roache tie with .\l.irk 
-Molloy and Danny .McClosky. 

6 and 7 - . [ 1 ] Keith Palmer 
and Mark Fareri, (2[ Patrick 
Shea and Shawn Barry, [31 Cliff 
llession and Timmy Flavin. 

8 and 9 - [11 Mike Fowkes 
and Russ Leary, [21 Rickie 
Muriay and Mike Callahan, (31 
Sean Loughman and Janiey 
Seamans. 

10 and 11 - [1] John 
Gonzales and Mike Cristiani, [2[ 
Chadie McManus and Aldo 
DiMeco, [31 Dean Riz/o and 
Hddie O'Gara. 

I 2 and 1 3 - I 1 [ Tom Roche 
and Bobby Currier. (21 John 
McConville and Jim Crossen, [3| 
Todd Veale and Carroll Coletti. 
14-16-11] Steve Anderson 
and Jackie Molloy, (21 Pete 
Cassidy and Steve Sullivan, [3] 
Mike Dunford and Dave Raftery. 
BLUEBERRY PIE EATING 

CONTEST 
Girls and Boys 5 and under 
[11 Mike Loughman, (21 Mike 
O'Brien, [3] Patty Duffy. 

Girls 6 and 7 - [ 1] Jennifer 
Cassidy, [21 Maura Callahan, 
[3] Nancy Callahan. 

8 and 9 - [11 Patty Hooley, 
(2! Ruth Gallagher, [3| Joan 
Roche. 

10 and 11 - [11 Karen Shea, 
[2] Nancy Tolson, [3| Andrea 
Coleman. 

12 and 13 - [1] Susan 
Stearns, [2] Jane Hanlon, [31 
tie - Peggy Rugg and Claire 
Lynch. 

14 - 16 - [11 Mary Braman, 
[2] tie Sue Coleman and Kelly 
Tobin 

Boys 6 and 7 - (Ij Mark 
Fareri, [2] Keith Palmer, (31 
Marty Tolson. 

8 and 9 - ( 1 ] Louis Gonzales, 
[2] Ricky Murray, (3] tie-Ray 
Welliver and Mike Callahan. 

10 and 11 - (U John 
Gonzales, (2] Chris Gorman, 
(3] tie-Jimmy Dunford and 
Willie Gallagher. 

12 and 13 - (H Michael 
Dunford, (2) Bobby Currier, 
(3) Dan Murray and Steve 
Currier. 



-[II Sissy Fcancx . 
Dutty, 131 Ariciic 



14 - 
[21 Jimmy McConville. j.^l 
tic-Richie Bovle and .Steve 
Sullivan. 

-Mothers 
|:j Terry 
C..issidy. 

SOFTBALL rilROW 

Girls S and ^' ■ | 1| iicrni.c 
DcPictro. 1 21 Nancv Rnhcrts 
l-^l Diane Raftery. 

10 and II - [1] Kathy Fi\nn, 
12] Kristin O'Gara, [.^| N.incy 
Tolson. 

12 and 13 - [1] Chris Cunniff. 
[2] Susan Tolson, [3] Claire 
Lynch. 

14 and 15 - (H Rita Cassidy. 
[2] Kelly Tobin, [3] Dottie 
Irvine. 

Boys 8 and 9 - [1] David 
Coletti, [21 Matthew Tobm. [3] 
Michael Fowkes. 

10 and 11 - (11 Paul 
McConville, [21 Billy DeCarli. 
[31 Bruce Tobin. 

12 and 13 - (11 Don Marray. 
[2] John DeCarh, (31 Andy 
Driscoll. 

14 and 15 - [1] David 
Driscoll, [21 Steve Sullivan, [31 
Mike Boyle. 

SHOT PUT 

Girls 8 and 9 - ( 1 1 Dorothy 
Shea, (21 Diane Raftery. [3] 
Kathy Hussey. 

10 and 11 -(11 
[2] Lisa Coady, 
Clarke. 

12and 13-(11 Chris Cunniff. 
[2] Sue Coleman, [31 Marie 
McAuliffe. 

14 - 16 - [1] Rita Cassidy. 
[2] Dotty Irvine, [3[ Kelly 
Tobin. 

Boys 8 and 9 - [1] David 
Coletti, [21 Mike Fowkes, [3 1 
Russell Leary. 

1 and 11 - ( 1] Billy DeCarli, 
[2] Jim Flaherty, [31 Dan 
Molloy. 

12 and 13 -(H Dave Lewis. 
(2) Dennis Djerf, [31 Don 
Murray. 

14 - 16 - (1) Mike Boyle, [2[ 
Steve Sullivan, (31 Peter 
Cassidy. 

Algonquin Road's Musical 
Memories of the past 50 years 
won first place in the street 
competition. Second was 
Narragansett Rd and third, 
Virginia Rd. The flatbed 
competition was won by 
Samoset Avenue's Great Gadsby 
float. Highfield Road won 
second. 

Bicycle competition was won 
by Brian Milauskas. ., Mark 
Scariatta was second and Brian 
Garity, third. 



Kathy Flynn. 
(31 Suzanne 



Thursday, July 11, 1974 Quincy Sun Page 11 



FACTORY OUTLET STORE 

356 SOUTH AVENUE. WHITMAN. MASS. ON ROUTE 27 
OPEN EVENINGS UNTIL 9 — SATURDAYS UNTIL 5:30 



FABULOUS FOOTWEAR 

WORTH GOING OUT 
OF YOUR WAY FORI 



SALE! Men's Summer Shoes 

Black and White Brown and White 

Wing Tip Oxfords and All Leather Buckle Slip 0ns 

First Quality Values to $22.99 

JUST REDUCED TO 

Two Pairs for Only ^7.95 

(First Pair $4.95 — Second Pair $3.00) 



TWO PAIRS /!^;^^S A GOOD INVESTMENT 




All First Quality 

Suede, Leather and Suede Uppers 

Crepe Rubber Soles 

Chukka and Oxford Styles 

Solids, Two-tones Values to $18 

1st Pair ^2.99 
2nd Pair HM 



Sizes 
6 to 13 



^ / Our^ 

If ^^^>\^ Sensational 

i W^ J Men 



en's 1 

ua]§ 



TWO PAIRS 



Only 



Famous 

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Shoes for Men 

Other Brands In This Group 
Include "Volaire" 



// 



Bally" and "Verdi 



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All First Quality 
Values to '40.00 

Our Low Price 
^14.95 





Men's Leather Sandals 



ALL FIRST QUALITY 

VALUES TO ^15 

Some Rubber Soles 



1st Pair <2.88 
2nd Pair n.44 



Brown, Dark Brown 

Sizes 6 to 13 
(No 7/2 Sizes) 



Two Pairs for Only M.32 



two PAIRS 




IS A GOOD INVESTMENT 



Men's Shoes by "Regar "Pedwin" and Others 

Variety of Styles Values to ^30.00 



1st Pair 
2nd Pair 



«4.95 
3.00 



2 Pairs ^7.95 



(Our Regular $4,95 Oroup) 



1st Pair 
2nd Pair 



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"Regal" "Pedwin" "Verdi" and Others 
Variety of Styles Variety of Colors 

Sizes 6V2 to 13 
Values to $35 

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2nd Pair < 7.00 

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Page 12 Quincy Sun Thursday, July 1 1 , 1974 



^ Along The Campaign Trail 

Hedges Makes It Official, 
He's Candidate For Re-election 



Norfolk County Sheriff 
Charles W. Hedges, who i:as held 
that office for nearly 14 years, 
has made it official. He is a 
candidate for re-election. 

A former state senator from 
Quincy he has been sheriff since 
Dec. 27, 1960 when he defeated 
Democrat Peter McCormack of 
Brookline to fill the unexpired 
term of Sheriff Samuel Wragg, a 
Republican, who died in office. 

McCormack had been named 
by the then Gov. Foster Furcolo 
to fill the position until the 
election. Hedges praised "the 
men and women from every 
community for their aid and 
active support of him and his 
staff in establishing a well 
balanced program of education." 



These programs included 
drug, alcoholic, work-release, 
group therapy, religion, 
psychology, remedial reading, 
television and radio repair, 
cooking, baking, silk screening, 
journalism, resource and referral, 
earned furlough, musical, 
counselling, recreational, and 
classification programs. 

In addition generous 
donations of clothing, shoes, 
motion picture projectors, 
boxing ring and gloves, weight 
lifting equipment, ping-pong 
tables, books, newspapers, 
magazines, television and radio 
sets, and pianos have "been of 
high value", he said. 

Hedges pointed out that 
active personal and community 
participation has not only 
resulted in effective 



WEybANIc]' 



rehabilitation but has saved the 
taxpayers many thousands of 
dollars through the years. 

He recalled that his final 
decision to remain as Sheriff of 
Norfolk County was made not 
only by his desire to complete 
modern progressive penal 
programs but also to 
"compliment his loyal, 
experienced, and devoted staff 
of associates." 

Sheriff Hedges recalled that 
the policies and programs 
undertaken at his direction have 
been repeatedly praised by 
judges, attorneys, jurors, law 
enforcement officials, and penal 
authorities. 

He pledged that every effort 
will be made to constantly 
improve and effect the 
techniques he has initiated. 



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Dukakis Urges More 

Housing For Elderly 

In Quincy Stop 



Michael Dukakis, Democratic 
candidate for Governor, told a 
group of senior citizens in 
Quincy Monday that 
"Massachusetts should be 
expanding its commitment to 
elderly housing, rather than 
cutting it back. 

"No new bonding 
authorization for elderly housing 
has been requested for 1975," 
Dukakis said, "and the 
Department of Community 
Affairs has been told not to 
apply for any further 
authorization in future budget 
requests." 

Dukakis made the statement 
in a speech to members of the 
1000 Southern Artery Senior 
Citizens Center in Quincy. 

"Between 1970 and 1980," 
Dukakis continued, "the elderly 
population in Massachusetts will 
increase by almost 43,000. Yet 
the Department of Community 
Affairs, in its housing needs 
study, reports that its 1976 
request for new construction, 
rental and mortgage assistance 
for the elderly will be less than 
half of the 1975 totals. That 
request," emphasized Dukakis, 
"will remain at that level for the 
rest of the decade. 

"We already have a higher 



percentage of elderly citizens 
than most other states," Dukakis 
said. "That high percentage will 
remain constant through the end 
of the decade. So now is 
certainly not the time to cut 
back our commitntent to decent 
housing for the elderly. 

"With housing costs and 
interest rates going out of sight 
in this state," Dukakis said, 
"Massachusetts must be 
prepared to increase its 
commitment to elderly housing. 
The elderly, who often live on 
fixed incomes, are the first to 
suffer in a housing squeeze." 

Dukakis, who was the original 
legislative sponsor of the 
Massachusetts Housing Finance 
Agency, concluded that 
"subsidized housing in general is 
in trouble in this state, as we 
look for new ways to provide 
homes for our low and moderate 
income citizens. 

"But elderly housing has 
worked." Dukakis stated. "We 
know how to build it and how 
to maintain it. So there can be 
no realistic excuse for backing 
off from our commitment to 
provide a decent home for every 
elderly citizen in the 
Commonwealth." 



Police To Sponsor Field Day 
For South Shore Retarded 



The Quincy Police Betterment 
Association will sponsor a field 
day for South Shore retarded 
Saturda\' at Pageant Park, 
.Mcrrymount. 

The event will be from 10 
a.m. to 5 p.m., will include a 
cookout, games, rides, clowns 
and dancing to the rock music of 
the all girl band "Mandala". 

This is the fourth time the 
police association has sponsored 
such an event. Notes Patrolman 
David Doherty, president of the 
association, "The kids have a 
great time and so do all the 
officers who donate their time 



on this yearly party for the 
retarded." 

Attending the field day will 
be residents of the Paul A. Dever 
State School, Wrentham State 
School. Fernald State School, 
members Quincy Park 
Department, Milton Park 
Department, Weymouth Park 
Department and the retarded 
youth from the South Shore 
area. 

Coordinating the event - 
Patrolman William Donnelly and 
Arnold Rinkofsky, South Shore 
Association for Retarded 
Citizens. 



Dean Nicastro Receives Degree 



Dean Paul Nicastro of 45 
Edison St., Quincy Point was 
awarded the degree of Doctor of 
Law from Harvard Law School 
at the annual commencement 
exercises of Harvard University 
last week. 

Nicastro, who is the son of 
Dr. and Mrs. Joseph S. Nicastro 
of the same address, is a summa 



cum laude graduate of Harvard 
College and a member of the 
national honor society of Phi 
Beta Kappa. 

He was Latin Orator at 
Harvard commencement in 1969, 
and was Class Valedictorian at 
Boston College High School in 
1965. Nicastro is secretary of 
the Harvard Cub ■of Quincy. 



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A Tiny Jar Of Flowers^ 
And Richard Stratton 

By HENRY BOSWORTH 

The late Mrs. Dorothy Rae, long-time popular traffic supervisor at 
the Atherton Hough School was honored last month when a placque 
was dedicated in her memory. 

A large crowd turned out for the ceremonies as the stone-based 
placque in front of the Houghs Neck fire station was unveiled. 

And for the past week or so, someone has quietly returned each 
day to place a small jar of fresh cut flowers on top of the memorial. 

A touching tribute. From a child? 

*** 

THIS WEEK'S TV special on former POW Richard Stratton was a 
moving experience for viewers, 

The former Quincy resident who spent six years as a prisoner of 
the North Vietnamese apparently has been able to pick up his life 
back home without much difficulty. The scenes of the family at 
church-especially his tribute to his wife, Alice, and then their 
renewal of marriage vows left quite an impression on the viewer. 

Stratton in a visit to Quincy last year also left a lasting impression 
on Ward 1 Councillor Leo Kelly. Stratton took part in the 
Merrymount Association July 4th celebration and parade. 

And as he finished the parade route and took his position waiting 
for the others, two men started talking as the American flag passed 
by. 

Stratton leaned over, thumped one of them in the back and said: 
"The flag is going by. Acknowledge the flag." [They did] . 

Kelly, who was standing beside Stratton says: "I'll never forget 
that!" \*>* 

A NEW LAW firm will materialize in the fall. Joining together as 
partners: Rep. William Delahunt, Rep. Thomas Brownell, Assistant 
City Solicitor Robert Fleming and Robert Langlois, federal funds 
coordinator for Norfolk County. The four will locate their office in 
the Dimmock Building sometime in September. Come to think of it, 
this may be Quincy's only law firm. 

*** 

TOOTING OWN HORN DEPT: Item here June 6: "Insiders 
report that City Purchasing Agent Richard Newcomb definitely will 
be named to a top post at Quincy City Hospital. 

"Newcomb, they say, will become assistant director of the 
hospital in July in charge of non-health departments such as 
maintenance, finance, housekeeping, etc. This was predicted here 
April 4. The job will reportedly pay about S 17,000." 

Headline in another local newspaper July 2: "City Purchaser To 
Get New Post At Hospital".- 

Toot! Toot! ^^^ 

HISTORIC EXCHANGE: After speaking at a flag raising 

ceremony at O'Hara Circle in Adams Shore July 4, Congressman 

James Burke was honored at a reception at the home of Paul Harold. 

Burke presented the Adams Shore Community Association with a 

flag which was flown over the Capitol. At the reception, Burke in 

turn was presented with a gift from John Whyte: a piece of the USS 

Constitution. 

*¥* 

SPEAKING OF Congressman Burke, Ronald P. lacobucci, an 
internist in his Washington, D.C. office. The other day young 
lacobucci was visited by the four women in his life: his 
grandmother, Mrs. Regina Montini; Mrs. Eleanor lacobucci, his 
mother; Miss Rita Montini, his aunt; and Miss Helen Johnson, a 
friend. 

Quincy tourists who also stopped by the office included Mr. and 
Mrs. Peter Bertrand of 30 Harrington Ave., and Mr. and Mrs. Ronald 
Leone of 4 Trafford St. 

*¥* 

LOOK ALIKE DEPT: Forrest Neal, Jr., the Quincy businessman 
and head of the MBTA board of directors, sends along a note saying 
h^ had to look twice at the photo on Page 1 of last week's Quincy 
Sun. That's the one showing Andrew Carrera, 12, receiving a Senate 
citation from Senator Arthur Tobin for saving a youngster from 
being hit by a truck at the Willard School. 

It was someone else in the photo-Ambrose Milford, president of 
the Willard School PTA-that caught Neal'seye. He thinks Milford is 
a look-alike to President Nixon. 

*** 

AMONG THOSE GIVING Benny Goodman deserving standing 
ovations at the South Shore Music Circus Sunday night were three 
well known South Shore figures and their ladies: Probate Judge 
Robert Ford, Ralph Tedeschi and Jack Conway. 

And in case you've forgotten or are merely wondering, Beniiy 
Goodman was crowned the "King of Swing" Aug. 21, 1935 at the 
Palomar in Los Angeles. That was the night the dancers stopped 
dancing and gathered around the bandstand to listen and applaud. 
He was then 26. 



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Thursday, July 1 1 , 1974 Quincy Sun Page 13 

• Letter Box 

Downtown Improvements vs. Helping Feed Elderly 



Editor, Quincy Sun: 

The Quincy Sun issue July 3, 
page 1, in its lead story reads, 
"$60,000 start for mini-parks in 
Quincy downtown area 
improvement." 

On the same page we read 
that the hot lunch for Quincy 
senior citizens will increase from 
50 cents to 60 cents effective 
July 15. 

The great city of Presidents 
cannot afford $10. per day, at 
the most [if 100 elderly attend] 
to help feed the old folks but it 
has $60,000 "so that people can 



sit on the benches and read in 
the evening". 

Will someone please tell "the 
powers that be" in Quincy that 
many of its citizens are having a 
hard time existing and they do 
not need this "move to allow 
people on foot to exist with cars 
on Hancock Street". Why not 
just tell the people that thus 
$60,000. left over from the 
garage nust be spent? 
Incidentally, this eliminated 
many benches and trees when 
the garage was built. 

A way to allow people to 
co-exist with traffic would be to 
close Hancock Street from 



Granite to School Streets and 
spend this $60,000 (if they 
must] on a maU. Then Quincy 
might become a shopping center 
with plenty of parking already 
provided in the rear of the 
stores. Hancock Street would no 
longer be a throughway in these 
boundaries and people could 
move around. 

In any event, deduct $10. a 
day from the $60,000. and help 
feed the elderly. Probably the 
architect and the contractors 
would be willing to contribute! 
Charles L. Murphy 
122 Everett St., Wollaston 



A'Thank You^ From Executive Hockey League 



Editor, Quincy Sun: 

On behalf of the Quincy 
Executive Hockey League, I 
want to thank you for your 
excellent coverage of our hockey 
games. 



Thank you also for having 
your representative, Paul Harold, 
present the Executive League 
Playoff Trophy at our banquet 
Thursday evening at Valle's 
Steak House. 

Your paper is truly a paper 



for the people of Quincy, and 
we sincerely appreciate your 
assistance in getting our league 
off to a fine start. 

Paul C. Hussey 

Commissioner 

Quincy Executive League 



$93,244 In Federal Grants For QJC 



Four federal grants totaling 
$93,244 have been allocated to 
Quincy Junior College for the 
fiscal year beginning July 1, 
1974. 

The sum is the largest federal 
grant awarded to the college. 



The largest single award is the 
sum of $76,710 in direct student 
aid under the Basic Educational 
Opportunity Grant Program - a 
program providing funds for 
students beginning their 
education after April 1, 1973. 



Other grants include $11,258 
for the College Work Study 
Program; $1,141 for the 
National Student Loan Program 
and $4,235 for the College 
Library Resources Program. 



Chamber Clambake Set For July 17 



A full day's program ranging 
from horseshoes to volley ball, 
topped off by a lobster bake will 
highlight the annual outing of 
the South Shore Chamber of 
Commerce July 17 at Peter's 
Grove, Kingston. 

Host will be George Reardon 
of President Chevrolet, Chamber 
president George Fay is 
chairman. Emcees will be Herb 
Fontaine of WJDA and Lou 
Cassani of President Chevrolet. 



Many companies in the South 
Shore also use the chamber's 
outing as their own and invite 
their employees to participate. 

Included among the invited 
guests are the South Shore's 
elected officials on the 
Congressional, State and local 
levels who represent the 
communities of Braintree, 
Canton, Cohasset, Hanover, 
Hingham, Holbrook, Hull, 
Milton, Norwell, Quincy, 



Randolph, Rockland, Scituate 
and Weymouth. 

The lobster bake and all food 
arrangements are being handled 
by Leighton Caterers of 
Weymouth who have catered the 
outing for many years. 

Reservations can be made by 
contacting Brian Alosi, South 
Shore Chamber of Commerce at 
479-1111. Tickets are $13.50 a 
person and include all activities 
of the day. 



Muscular Dystrophy Day At Edaville Railroad 



Saturday, July 20, from 10 
a.m. to 5:30 p.m. is Muscular 
Dystrophy Day at Edaville 
Railroad, Rte. 58, South Carver. 

Rex Trailer, Willie Whistle, 
Rondar the Magician, Clowns, 
and Gypsy Jazzbo's Calliope 
Variety Show will entertain and 
welcome visitors to ride the SVi 
mile train ride througli the red 
and greenery of the cranberry 
belt line. There's also a museum, 
carousel, zoo, model T turnpike, 
chicken bar-b-que and exhibits. 

All proceeds benefit Muscular 
Dystrophy Associations to help 

TREE WORK 

Compare our prices. Work 
guaranteed. Call 

335-7675 

331-3741 7/25 



provide patient care services, 
research, and summer camp for 
hundreds of thousands of 
children crippled by Muscular 
Dystrophy and related 
neuromuscular disease. 



NEWSBOYS WANTED 
Here's a chance to earn extra 
money by building a Quincy 
Sun home dehvery route. 

Telephone: 471-3100 



QUINCY CITY 
HOSPITAL 

Needs blood donations. 
Call for appointment 

773-6100 Ext. 438 or 439| 

Men. . Tues. • Wed. • Thurs, 
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Sat. 1-3:30 P.M. 






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Page 14 Quincy Sun Thursday, July 1 1 , 1974 



Montclair Men's Club 

Family Outing Contest 

Winners Announced 



More than 300 persons 
.attended the Montclair Men's 
Club annual Family Outing at 
D, inkwaters Grove in Randolph 
last Sunday. 

First, second, and third-place 
winners of the various contests 
were; 

Field race for boys 5 and 
under, Johnny Broadbent, Mike 
Savage and Dennis O'Reilly. For 
girls, Jannine Sumner, Michelle 
Ouellette and Donna Dovalski. 

Field race for boys 6 and 7, 
Jimbo Locke, Wayne Sumner 
and Jimmy Kelley. For girls, 
Carolyn O'Reilly, Kristine Locke 
and Jean Maloney. 

Field race for boys 8 and 9, 
Paul Maloney, Bryan Ellis and 
Tommy Kearney. For girls, Lisa 
Locke, Karen O'Reilly and 
Tracey Bulens. 

Field race for 10-year-old 
boys, Kenny Mann, David 
Adams and Eddie O'Reilly. For 
ten-year-old girls, Joyce 
Kearney, Peggy Bulens and Ann 
Marie Bulens. 

Field race for boys 1 1 and 12, 
Eddie Kearney, Chris Flaherty 
and Tommy Orrock. For girls, 
Nancy Pasquariello, Lisa 
Margenson and a three-way tie 
for third between Donna Ellis, 
Darlcne Bulens and Tara 



Mahoney. 

Boy's egg-throwing contest, 
Paul Zenga, Leo Doyle and John 
Ellis. In the girl's competition, 
Lisa Margenson, Nancy 
Pasquariello and Tara Mahoney. 

Ron Beresznicwicz and Janet 
Robak won the adult 
egg-throwing contest. 

Mike and Bryan Ellis won the 
horseshoe-pitching in the boy's 
competition. In adult 
competition, Ed and Dave 
Adams took first place and Mark 
Smith and Ed Reynolds won 
second place honors. 

Eileen and Donna Kovalski 
placed first in the girl's bocce 
contest. Mabel McGee and 
Marlene Ouellette were second. 

Dave Adams and Stan 
Kovalski were the adult cribbage 
champs. 

Club President Jim Locke 
also presented athletic jerseys to 
the Club's championship "Little 
Loop" bowling team. Team 
members are Captain Nick 
Anastas, Billy Vey, Jim Adams, 
Billy Connors and John GuUins. 

Bill Connelly, chairman of the 
Outing Committee, was assisted 
by Herb Baker, Ed Adams, Bob 
Rice, John O'Reilly and Webby 
EHis. 



Ensign Alan McKenzie 
On Deployment To Spain 



Navy Ensign Alan B. 
McKenzie, son of Mr. and Mrs. 
Alexander McKenzie of 179 



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North Quincy 479-9685 

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AUXILIARY POLICE lead Squantum July 4th parade along East Squantum St. as crowd looks on from 

sidewalk and seawall. 

[Quincy Sun Photo by Laban Whittaker] 

19 Winners Of Hibachis, Cookout 
Utensils Announced By NQBPA 



The North Quincy Business 
and Professional Association 
announces the winners of 
double-grill hibachis and 

cookout utensils given away by 
members in conjunction with 
the June opening of Granite 
Co-operative Bank's new North 
Quincy headquarters. 

The winners and where they 
won: 

Blanche Lynch, 29 South 
Bayfield Rd, North Quincy, at 
Doran and Horrigan. 

Maureen Cribby, 46 Vane St., 




North Quincy, at Mister Sub. 

Saul Lipsitz, 40 Harriet Ave., 
North Quincy, at Quincy Savings 
Bank. 

Virginia Moore, 10 Windsor 
Rd, North Quincy, at Fashion 
Quality Cleaners. 

Louise Skudris, 88 Heiir>' St., 
North Quincy, at South Shore 
National Bank. 

Anne E. McCarthy, 44 North 
Central Ave., WoUaston, at 
Hancock Bank. 

Edith Stracuzzi. 40 French 
St., North Quincy, at 
Naborhood Pharmacy. 

John Mini, 470 Hancock St., 
North Quincy, at Balducci's. 

Bernard Stern, 53 Erin Rd, 
Stougliton, at Henry E. Thorton. 

Michale Rose, 17 Hovey St., 
North Quincy, at Granite 
Co-operative Bank. 

Christopher Nee, 978 Main 
St., Hingham, at Francette's 



World of Nature. 

Jack Hoffman, 34 Holmes St., 
North Quincy, at Hussey Radio 
Shop. 

Barbara Piccinotti, 12 Eames 
St., Milford, at Walsh's 
Restaurant. 

Tom McLaughlin, 37 Albion 
Rd, North Quincy, at Cammy's 
Delicatessen. 

William Sullivan, 30 Becket 
St., North Quincy, at Curtis 
Compact. 

Helen Hauser, Palisade St., 
Nashua, N.H., at President Real 
Estate. 

Annette Holland, Dorchester, 
at Nesco TV. 

Carol Carroll, 163 Safford St., 
North Quincy, at Stan's Card 
and Gift Shop. 

Richard Stack, 644 East 
Eighth St., South Boston, at 
Dudley Furniture. 



NESCO 
423 HANCOCK ST. 
NO. QUINCY 



Geoffrey Hennessy Tours 
Columbia With GBYSO 




LUNCHEON 
SPECIALS 

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NORTH QUINCY 

FREE PARKING 
IN REAR 




Violinist Geoffrey Hennessy 
of 308 Billings Rd, North 
Quincy, was among 100 young 
musicians to tour Columbia with 
the Greater Boston Youth 
Symphony Orchestra [GBYSO]. 



Hennessy, 18, has been 
playing the violin tor eight years 
and has been a member of 
GBYSO for four years. This was 
his first tour with the orchestra. 



An Old l-ashioned Hardivare Store E'it 1898 

TURNER HARDWARE 

471 HANCOCK STREET 
NORTH QUINCY. MASS. 02171 
Glass 472-1167 Trewax 

Sacrete Products Plumbing Supplies 

Dutch Boy Paints Scotts Lawn Products 

Benjamin Moore Paints Hand & Power Tools 

General Hardware Supplies Agrico Lawn & Garden Products] 

1^00% Pure Hardwood 
Lump Charcoal $099 
20 LB. Bag J 

Scotch-Gard a r.. c 

Fabric Protector "Con Fourgone 

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Spray Can ^>^.OU Reg. $2.75 15 oz. Pkg. 

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Comu in and visit with us Paul & Don Nogueira & Little Dave 



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Thursday, July 11, 1974 Quincy Sun Page 15 



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NORTH QUINCY 



773-5508 



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Let us mind your business . . . 

DORAN & HORRIGAN 

D] 



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19 Billings Road, N. Quincy 
4797697 



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419 HANCOCK ST. 
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98M388 



Page 16 Quincy Sun Thursday, July 1 1 , 1974 

Brett Seeks More MDC 
Police Coverage On QSD 



Rep. Joseph Brett has written 
a second letter to MDC Police 
Deputy Supt. Edward Fahey, 
asking for expanded police 
coverage along Quincy Shore 
Drive. 

In his letter Brett said, "I am 
still being deluged with calls 
from North Quincy and 
Wollaston citizens who are 
concerned over the inadequacy 
of police patrolling along Quincy 
Shore Drive." 

He cited several problems near 
the beach front area: cars 
speeding, people crossing the 



highway without using the 
pedestrian signal lights, and 
gangs congregating along the sea 
wall "until the wee hours of the 
morning." 

Brett said he had been told 
that police coverage would 
expand during the summer 
months. However, he said, "the 
expansion, if any, is still far 
from adequate." 

Brett urged Fahey to help 
"restore order and safety to all," 
thus bringing "a share of peace 
and comfort" to the residents 
near Quincy Shore Drive. 



Lt. Joseph Burke 
Marine School Graduate 



Marine Second Lt. Joseph E. 
Burke Jr., son of Mr. and Mrs. 
Joseph E. Burke Sr. of 145 
Willow St., Wollaston, has 
graduated from The Basic 
School at the Marine Corps 
Development and Education . 
Command, Quantico, Va. 

The 26-week course includes 
instruction in leadership 
principles, map reading, 
marksmanship, tactics, military 



law,, personnel administration, 
Marine Corps history and 
traditions, communications and 
physical conditioning 
techniques. 

It is designed to prepare 
newly commissioned officers for 
duty in the Fleet Marine Force, 
with emphasis on the duties and 
responsibilities of a rifle platoon 
commander.' • • • . 



David MacCoy Promoted 
At Weymouth Savings 



David S. MacCoy of 283 
Highland Ave., Wollaston has 
been promoted to an assistant 
treasurer at Weymouth Savings 
Bank. 

He has worked at the bank for 
three years. Prior to his position 
there, he was a stockbroker at H. 



C. Wainwright & Co., Boston. 

MacCoy is a graduate of 
Deerfield Academy $nd h.olds an 
Economics degree from Tulane 
University. He will -continue 
with his present duties in the 
securities /and mortgage 
departments. 



Peter Davis In Phi Beta Kappa 



Peter J. Davis of 26 Hilma St., 
North Quincy was initiated into 
the University of Massachusetts, 



WOLLASTON 

Beale St. off Hancock St. 

QUINCY PR 3 1600 



WED. 7/10 THRU 7/17/74 

AMERICAN 
GRAFFITI 

9:15 [P.G.] 
ALSO 

SHOWDOWN 

STARRING ROCK HUDSON 
AND DEAN MARTIN 

7:30 [P.G.i 



Amherst chapter, • of Phi Beta 
Kappa. 

Membership in, the society is 
the. highest national honor 
awarded for . putstafiding 
scholarship ia the liberal arts and 
sciences. Davis is one Of 1 63 new 
members in the chapter. . 



ADMISSION $1.00 



MUSIC LESSONS 

Professional Instruction 
DRUM PIANO GUITAR 
BRASS REEDS 

WOLLASTON MUSIC CENTER' 

27 Beale St._^ Wollaston 
Call 7^3-5325 




INDOOR flMiS OUTDOOR 
ACCESSORIES 

FLAGS MADE TO ORDER 
State Flags Church Flags 

Flags of All Nations ' 
EAGLE FLAG CO., INC. 

147 Beach St., Wollaston, Mass. 02170 

Tel.- 617.472-8242 



WOLLASTON 




IT WAS EYES up during basketball foul shooting contest at Wollaston July 4th Field Day at Pageant 
Field. Activities were sponsored by the Wollaston Juniors and the Wollaston Community AssociatJoni. 

1,000 Attend Wollaston Assn.'s 
First 4th Of July Celebration 



Approximately 1,000 
residents took part in the first 
annual July Fourth celebration 
held at Pageant Field, 
Merry mount. 

Sponsored by the newly 
organized Wollaston Community 
Association it is planned to 
make the hoUday celebration an 
annual event. Cooperating in the 
venture was the Wollaston 
Woman's Club. 

Ice cream, cold drinks, and 
balloons were distributed to all 
in attendance. Prizes were 



awarded to the following: 

Doll Carriage Parade, Danielle 
Spring, Jimmy Phelan, Julia 
Marsters, and Beth Roberts; 
Bicycle Parade, Marie 
Manchester, Sina Fee, and Ricky 
Derosiers; Horribles Parade, 
Cheryl, Michelle and Steven 
White, Dwayne Wilcoxen, and 
Christen, Dennis and John 
Keohane. 

The foul shooting contest was 
won by Joseph Flynn, Pat 
Wilkinson, Linda Widdison, and 
Maurine Sullivan. 



An pld-fashioned pie eating 
contest was won by Dan Lyons.. 

The committee on 
arrangements included Mrs, 
Kathy Roberts and Mrs. Pam 
Spring, co-chairmen; Bob and 
Diane Ulchak, Joyce Baker, 
Dorothy Blyth, Cindy Hurley, 
Joan Keohane, Kay Borak, Tom 
MuUaney, Margaret Richardson, 
Vicki Smith, Ed Spring, Audrey 
Wilcoxen, and Bill Connolly. 
Residents of Fenno House 
served as judges of the various 
events. 



Petitions Ask 'Danceograph^ Course At High Schools 



Over 300 Quincy parents, 
students and other residents 
have signed petitions endorsing 
the implementation of a new 
course in Quincy's high schools. 

The course is called 
"Danceograph, the Language of 
Motion". It is a system of 
reading and writing the dance 
and of developing physical and 
mental health. 



The Committee tor 
Educational Recreation met 
with Sdiool Supt. Dr. Lawrence 
Creedon, Carl Leone, 
co-ordinator of athletics, 
Kenneth Rickson, co-ordinator 
of physical education and 
health, and Walter Lunsman, 
director of arts and humanities, 
to urge that the course be 
offered and to present the 



petitions. 

School officials gave initial 
approval to move the course 
through the channels necessary 
for acceptance into the 
curricula. 

Leone, Rickson and John 

'Mahbney, social health 

co-ordinator will work towards 

acceptance of Danceograph into 

the curricula. 



SOUTH SI JOB E 
SEWING MACHINE CO. 

We Service All Makes Sewing 
Machines and Vacuum Cleaners 
665A Hancock St., Wollaston 
471-5982 



4 From Quincy On 
Heart Assn. Boards 



The Wollaston Community Association 

Would Like To Thank The Following 

For Contributing To The Success Of Their 

First Annual Fourth Of July Celebration: 



Joyce Baker 

Joe Brett 

Burger King • Quincy 

George Burke 

Mary Collins 

Colonial Federal Savings & Loan 

BillDelahunt 

Granite Plumbing Supply 

Howdy's • Quincy 

Keohane's Funeral Home 



Jack Lydon 

McDoriald's - Weymouth 

Tom Mullaney 

Mike Peatridge 

Warren Powers 

Stan's Pizza of Alumni Cafe 

Winfield House 

Wollaston American Legion Post 

Wollaston Businessmen's Assoc. 

Wollatton Woman's Club Jrs. 



Four Quincy residents have 
been elected to committees of 
the American Heart Association, 
Southeast Massachusetts 
Chapter. 

Alyce Souden, RN, will serve 



NEWSBOYS WANTED 
Here's a chance to earn extra 

money by building a Quincy 

Sun home delivery route. 

Telephone: 471-3100 



on the Executive Committee and 
on the Board of Directors. 

Richard Koch, Dorothy Juitt, 
RD, and Arnold Levine were all 
newly elected to the Board of 
Directors. 

The elections took place at 
the annual meeting of the 
Association held at Holiday Inn, 
Brockton. Following a social 
hour, a gourmet, fat-controlled 
buffet was served. 




WOLLASTON 
CREDIT UNION 

PERSONAL & AUTO LOANS 
NO NOTICE SAVINGS ACCTS. 
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651 HANCOCK ST., 
WOLLASTON 

773-3500 773-8600 

OPENMON.THURS. 9-8 TUES., WED., FRI. 9-5 



Thursday, July 1 1 , 1974 Quincy Sun Page 17 



Council Continues Battle With Mayor Over Trash-Garbage 



(Cont'd from Page 21 

phrase "landfill facility," he 
said. 

Powers said the amended 
Section 37 "expresses the 
current feeling of voters of 
Quincy as to what they want as 
an ordinance." 

Also on the agenda was the 
planned filing of legislation 
co-sponsored by Rep. William 
Delahunt and Tobin. This bill 
was rejected by Hannon. 

Powers admitted that a literal 
interpretation of the present 
1965 Acts and Resolves could 



allow the dumping of garbage in 
the Quincy facility. But he 
emphasized that the intent of 
the authors of the act was 
merely to create the needed 
landfill facility, not to permit a 
mixed collection of garbage and 
rubbish. 

Powers said that he has 
spoken to three men who were 
councillors at the time of the 
drafting of the act: George B. 
McDonald, now a Norfolk 
County Commissioner; George 
G. Burke, now district attorney; 
and John J. Quinn, present 



"Dean" of the City Council. 
Powers said all three agreed that 
the 1965 act was intended to 
create a landfill facility, not to 
permit the mixed deposit of 
garbage and rubbish. 

Powers commented: 

"One has to look at the 
historical sequence of events. 
From 1965 to 1974 there was a 
separate collection of garbage 
and rubbish. If the intent of the 
1965 act were to allow for 
mixed collection of garbage and 
rubbish, the City would not have 
waited neaily a decade to 
implement the law." 



Powers also said that the 
original 1965 act was "drafted 
too broadly," allowing for the 
possible implementation of an 
incineration program to deal 
with the garbage. He said that 
the amended act would 
"attempt to overcome a 
conclusion that could be 
formed," to combine the 



dumping of garbage and rubbish. 

Powers feels that only one 
conclusion is possible; garbage 
and rubbish should be collected 
separately. 

"This is an equitable 
situation," he said. "One must 
go behind what was written and 
look at the totality of the 
situation." 



Garbage-Trash Pickup Patrols To End 



Mayor Walter J. Hannon has 
commended Quincy residents 
for their "spirit of co-operation" 
in complying with the combined 
garbage-rubbish pick-up. 

"The spirit of co-operation of 
the citizens in Quincy has made 
this policy work," he said. "I'd 
like to thank the residents for 
their help." 



The Mayor said that the 
transition to a combined 
collection was "smooth and 
successful." Commenting that 
the extra volume of waste at the 
dump site did not create any 
significant problems. 

According to the Mayor, the 
transition has been so successful 
that the previously announced 



30-day patrol of the pick-up 
route will stop at the end of this 
week. He emphasized, however, 
that patrol teams will be 
available to inspect specific areas 
along the collection route if 
needed. 

The Mayor also praised 
residents for restraining their 
dogs during pick-up hours. 



Ricciuti Clarifies City Dump Hours 



Public Works Commissioner 
James J. Ricciuti has clarified a 
misunderstanding regarding 
Saturday dumping hours. 

He noted that the dump is 
closed to commercial 
contractors at 12 noon and is 
open to residents until 4 p.m. 

According to Ricciuti, 
residents driving an automobile 
or beach wagon must show their 
registration at the control point 
at the dump. 

However, residents driving a 
pick-up truck or other type of 
truck, must obtain a seven-day 
permit from the Department of 

Renegades Host 
CYO Contest 

The Quincy Renegades will be 
the hosts Friday evening at 6:30 
p.m. for a CYO Music Circuit 
contest at Quincy Stadium. 

Senior Drum and Bugle Corps, 
Senior Drill Teams, Prep 
Division Drum and Bugle Corps, 
Junior Drum and Bugle Corps 
and Junior Drill Teams will be in 
action. 

Entries in the Senior Drum 
and Bugle Corps class are 
competing for a berth in the 
National CYO Invitational 
contest to be held Tuesday, Aug. 
13 at Boston College Alumni 
Stadium. 

Holy Family, Rockland, and 
the Jeanettes of Lynn are tied 
for first place in the Senior 
Drum Corps race with seven 
points each. 

The Quincy Renegades 
themselves occupy first place in 
the Junior Division Drum and 
Bugle Corps race. They have 
garnered eight points with two 
straight victories. St. Francis, 
Weymouth, is tied for second 
with the Annunciators of 
Somerville. They have five 
points each. 



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There is no charge for the 
permit provided the tnickload is 
household rubbish. If the 



truckload is not household 
rubbish, the person will be 
charged according to the 
registered weight of the vehicle. 




A Place to Grow 

Christian 

Science 

Sunday 

School 

from Nursery to 20 years of age 

10 A.M. Sunday Morning 

First Church of 
Christ, Scientist 

20 Greenleaf Street, Quincy 



ti 



V%i 



WOUASTON 



Bank-Dine-Shop-Save 






Whatever your shopping 
needs the Wollaston area 
has a lot to offer. The 
Shopping Center is 



conveniently located at 
the corners of Hancock, 
Beach and Beale Streets. 
The stores listed on this 



page offer a wide variety 
of services and 
merchandise from 
Cameras, Insurance, Hair 



ALLAN'S TAPE & STEREO CTR. 

16 Beale St. 472-9698 
Open Daily 10 to 9 
Sat. Till 6 
ANDREA'S GIFT SHOPPE 
19A Beale St. 472-9697 
Open Mon. thru Sat. 9:30 to 5 
Arlyne Bearse and Grace Lutsky 

ARLENE'S BAKERY 

9 Beale St. 472-4025 
iDaily Bakery Specials 
1 2 Large I'A lb. Loaves of Bread .994 

BARRY'S DELICATESSEN 

21 Beale St. 472-3322 
Open Till 6:30 Daily 

BEACON CLEANSERS 

624 Hancock St. 773-7400 
Open 7 A.M. to 6 P.M. 
CARITA COIFFEURS 
29 A Beale St. 471-6611 
Open 5 Days, Thurs. & Fri. Till P. 

COLONIAL FEDERAL SAVINGS 
AND LOAN ASSOCIATION 

15 Beach St. 471-0750 

8 to 6 Weekdays, 8 to 7:30 Thursdays^ 

COTTAGE PAINT & WALLPAPER 

652 Hancock St. 479-7169 

Oven 9 to 5:30 - Thurs. & Fri. Till 9 



FRANK EVANS CO. INC. 

343 Newport Ave. 479-1014 
Op'en 8 to 5 Daily 

GRANITE 5^ TO $1.00 

7 Beale St. 
Frank & Bob Braga 
Open 9:30 to 5:30 Fri. Till 8 
GREETING CARD SHOP 

15 Beale St. 472-1987 
Open 9:30 to 5:30 

HANCOCK BANK & TRUST CO. 

20 Beale St. 773-0500 

Open Thurs. 6 to 8 - Lobby 9 to 3 

Drive-Up 8:30 to 4:30 Daily 

HAPPY CHEF 

661 Hancock St. 472-9444 
Open Every Evening 

KEY TO ELEGANCE 

831 Hancock St. 471-2323 

Open 9:30 to 9 Fridays 

9:30 to 5 Daily, Except Friday 
LINCOLN PHARMACY 

716 Hancock St. 472-4246 

A. R. Murphy Jr., Reg. Pharm. 

Open Daily 8 to 9 Sun. 8 to 6 
MUG-'N-MUFFIN 

31 Beale St. 472-9641 

Open 7 A.M. to Midnite 



Styling, Musl'c, 
Restaurants, Home 
Decorating and 
Remodeling, Cards and 
Gifts. 

NOBLE'S CAMERA SHOP 

680 Hancock St. 773-6077 
Open 9:30 to 6 Daily, Fri. Till 8 

PURITY SUPREME 

615 Hancock St. 
Open Every Evening 

RAFAELA COIFFEURS 

672 Hancock St. 472-9229 
Open Thurs. 9 to 9 - Daily 9 to 6 
Closed Mondays 

SCHULTZ, DOYLE & STODDARD INC. 

624 Hancock St. 472-4800 

SOUTH SHORE NATIONAL BANK 

Clay & Chapman Sts. 471-0361 
Open Friday Till 7:30 

WOLLASTON CREDIT UNION 

651 Hancock St. 773-3500 
Open Mon. & Thurs. Till 8 

WOLLASTON DONUT SHOPPE 

17 Beale St. 479-1806 
Open 6 to 6 Daily 

WOLLASTON MUSIC and HOBBY SHOP 

27 Beale St. 773-5325 

Open Daily Till 5:30, Mon. & Tues. Till 8 



"Protection That Never Sleeps" 
BERRY INSURANCE AGENCY INC. 

General Insurance 

Brokers 

All Types Of Insurance 

671 HANCOCK ST., QUINCY 479-5500 



Officers and Directors of the Wollaston Business 

and Professional Association 
President: Irving Boyes - Schultz, Doyle & Stoddard Inc. 

Sec'y-Treas: Bernice R. King - N. J. Riggs & Son 

Recording Sec'y: E. Sarto Minihan ■ Ret. - Affial. Sp. Shore Nat'l Bank 
Directors: Daniel R. Barry - Barry's Deli 

Henry G. Berry - Berry's Ins. Agcy Inc. 

Frank Crotty - General Business Services 

A. L. Hallberg - Purity Supreme 

Jack Lydon : Lydon-Russell Funeral Home 

Elden Meady - Harmon Plumbing 

Ronald Neilsen - South Shore National Bank 

Harold Robbins - Robbins Garage 




Page 18 Quincy Sun Thursday, July 11, 1974 



DEATHS 



Mrs. Corcta I Caldwell I 
Tunotte of 63-A Martemen St., 
unexpectedly at a Brain tree 
nursing home, July 2. 

Mrs. Mabel / Wilson/ Benson, 

84, of 185 East Squantum St., at 
the Samuel Marcus Nursing 
Home, Weynumth, July 2. 

Orlie L. Anderson, 73, of 11 
Castle Rd, Weymouth, formerly 
of Quincy, on arrival at South 
Shore Hospital, Weymouth, July 

2. 

Mrs. Debtte /Frost/ Monroe, 
90, of 12 Cyprus St., Brain tree, 
formerly of Quincy. at a heal 
nursing hemic, July 2. 

Mrs. Isabelle C. IDillon/ 
Belanger, 85, of 26 Grove St.. 
Weymouth, formerly of Quincy, 
at a local nursing home, July 2. 

James F. Morrill Sr., 60, of 
135 Winthrop St.. at Quincy 
City Hospital. July 2. 

Walter F. Murray Jr., 49. of 
49 Union St., Mansfield, 
formerly of Quincy, at the 
Quincy City Hospital, July 5. 

Mrs. Anna/Hcalyj Sweeny of 
Quincy at the Deaconess 
Hospital, Boston, July 5. 

Donald Guivens, 32, of 
iongw'ood Calif, formerly of 
Quincy, accidentally in 
California, July 4. 

Mrs. Ethel [Keith/ Russell, 
75, of 27 Washington St., at 
Quincy City Hospital, July 7. 

Miss Rose A. Comi. 83, of 
Ritchie Rd, at Quincy City 
Hospital, July 7. 

Mrs. Sarah M. { Walsh j King, 

85, of 18 Collins Rd, Holbrook, 
formerly of Quincy, at the 
Goddard Memorial Hospital, 
Stoughton, July 7. 

Mrs. Dorothy /.Acorn/ 
Sabean, 71, of 19 Concord St.. 
Rockland, formerly of Quincy, 
at a Rockland nursing home, 
July 6. 

Antonio Campanale, 85, of 53 
Newbury Ave., at Quincy City 
Hospital, July 6. 

Roland M. Sirois, 35, of 14 
Hardwick Road, accidentally, 
July 7. 



Jesse G. Pinhero, 86, of 48 
Turner St., at the Otis Hospital, 
Cambridge, July 1. 

Mrs. Winifred T. /Cole/ 
Kendall, 82, of 41 Appleton St., 
at her summer home in Eastham, 
June 30. 

Mrs. Helen J. /Myatt/ 
Kerrigan-Bean, 53, of 83 Pearl 
St., Middleboro, formerly of 
Quincy, July 1. 

Herbert G. Sadlier, 70, of 81 
Brook St., at Quincy City 
Hospital, July 1. 

Joseph F. Gilraine, 61, of 
Quincy, at the Bedford VA 
Hospital, June 29. 

Mrs. Elizabeth /Kelley/ 
McNulty, 78, of 166 Pine St.. at 
a Boston nursing home, July I. 

Mrs. .Sadie M. /Simpson/ 
I.ynds. of Van Nuys. Calif, 
formerly of Quincy. at 
Northridgc Hospital, Los 
Angeles, Calif, June 30. 

Mrs. Laura /Broulct/ DuPree, 
82, of 19 Old Colony A ve., at a 
Wevmouth nursing home. June 
30. 

W. Albert Richards, 59, of 26 
Harbor Villa Ave, Brain tree, 
formerly of Quincy, 
unexpectedly at his home, June 
29. 

Miss Florence A Eichorn, 92, 
of 134 Sherman St., July 3. 

John M. Carroll Sr., 61. of 26 
Sycamore St., at Quincy City 
Hospital, July 6. 

Mrs. Elizabeth A. /Conway/ 
Morey, 78, 5 Snug Harbor 
Court, at a local hursing home, 
July 6. 

Walter F. Murray Jr., 49, of 
49 Union St., Mansfield, 
formerly of Quincy, at Quincy 
City Hospital, July 5. 

Mrs. Olive /Roberts/ Seavey, 
82, of 260 Amity St., Amherst, 
formerly of Quincy, at the 
Kanes Nursing Home in 
Amherst, July 8. 

Mrs. Caroline /Berryhill/ 
Hemeon, 75, of 11 LaCivita 
Court, Stoughton, formerly of 
Quincy, at Goddard Memorial 
Hospital, July 6. 





74ELMSTREET-QUINCY 






326 COPELAND STREET 
W. QUINCY 



Director 

11. JOSEPH SWEIMEY 
tel«ptio9t 773-2728 



Hannon Urges Participation 
In City Employees Blood Bank 



Mayor Walter J. Hannon urges 
city employees to participate in 
the Quincy City Employees 
Blood Bank. 

the bank is part of a 
newly-established Blood 
Procurement Program at Quincy 
City Hospital. 

Under the program, every 
donor is offered protection not 
only for himself but also for his 
immediate family at a ratio of 
two pints for each donation 
during a one-year period. The 
Mayor said, "By keeping a 
continuous supply of blood on 
hand for transfusions, you and 
your family will always be 
protected. 

"The community must be 



made aware that the need for 
blood is the sole responsibility 
of the community itself. As your 
Mayor, 1 urge you to participate 
in this most worthy project." 

Donors may call the Hospital 
at extensions 438 and 439 for an 
appointment. Anyone between 
the ages of 18 and 65 may 
donate blood. A 17 year-old 
may donate with a parent's 
approval and 66 year-olds with a 
doctor's approval. Donating 
hours are Monday, Tuesday, 
Wednesday and Thursday from 9 
a.m. to 3 p.m., and from 7 to 
9:30 p.m.; Friday, from 1 2 to 2 
p.m.; and Saturday from 1 to 
3:30 p.m. 

Emma Hassan, volunteer 
supervisor at the Hospital, 



reminds the public that they, 
too, can donate blood during the 
hours listed above. 

'^Everyone is willing to donate 
blood during a tragedy," she 
said. "But why wait until a 
tragedy or an emergency strikes 
to donate? The blood is needed 
on the shelves now." 

Miss Hassan noted that new 
donors might be apprehensive 
about giving blood. But she said 
that the staff taking blood from 
volunteers is congenial and if 
necessary, comforting to donors. 
The entire blood-donating 
process takes a mere 15 minutes 
from filling out a 
questionnaire, to donating the 
blood, to resting and snacking 
on orange juice and cookies. 



23 Pints Of Blood Donated At Point Congregational 



Mrs. Mildred Ambrosia, 
Volunteer Blood Donor 
Chairman for the Greater 
Quincy Red Cross Chapter 
announces that 23 pints of 
blood were donated during a 
recent bloodmobilc visit at 
Quincy Point Congregational 
Church. 

Those donating were: 
Rev. Ronald J. Cebik, C. Ruth 
Cebik, James Chaney, Arthur 



Corniack, Robert A. Curtis, 
David Demaggio, Colin A. 
Donaldson, Edna Goranson, 
Jeffrey J. Isaacson, Joyce E. 
King, Taimi Korpela, Louise 
Mulloy, Glen T. Munn, Harold 
D. Parker, Robert P. Pitts, 
Woodrow Sawyer, Henry E. 
Smith, Patricia Sweeney, Warren 
Sweeney, Wilfred Trotnian, 
Audrey J. Welch, Owen R. 
White, and Gary Wintermeyer. 
Woodrow Sawyer. Blood 



Chairman for the Quincy Point 
Congregational Church was in 
charge of recruiting donors. He 
was assisted by Jon 
Wintermeyer, Mrs. John Milne, 
Ralph Cross, Douglas Tatreau, 
James Chaney, Herman Crooker, 
Arthur Curtis, Mrs. Donald 
Gohl, Paul Peterson, Ella Harris 
and Mrs. Pearson. Mrs. Ronald 
Cebik and Mrs. Woodrow 
Sawyer prepared and served the 
evening meal. 



Attendance Up At St. John's 
Despite National Downward Trend 



Attendance is reported 
falling off drastically at 
churches around the country, 
but not so in at least one 
Quincy parish. 

St. John's Catholic Church, 
Quincy Center, reports 3,025 
people are attending services 
there each weekend in 1974. 

Compare that to the 2,800 
per week in 1970 and 2,700 



reported in 1971 and you've 
got a trend to gladden a 
pastor's heart. 

Now it could be that 
shortages and prices have 
gotten so far out of hand that 
some people just can't afford 
to go anywhere else but to 
church. 

Or maybe movies like "The 
Exorcist" are making people 
stop and think 



Rev. John J. Tierney, 
pastor at St. John's, is at a 
loss to explain it. "There 
hasn't been any noticeable 
increase in the parish 
population," he said. 

"Perhaps some of those 
who have fallen away are 
coming back," Fr. Tierney 
suggests. "We'd like to think 
that." 



Counselling Help Available At Alcoholism Clinic 



Persons with alcohol or 
alcohol-related problems can 
receive counseling help through 
a new outreach program on the 
South Shore. 

The program called the 
"South Shore Alcoholism Clinic 
Without Walls" provides 
counseling and referral services 
to persons in nine South Shore 
communities - Weymouth, 
Quincy, Milton, Randolph, 
Braintree, Hingham, Hull, 
Cohasset and Scituate. Clinics 
are located in Quincy, 
Weymouth, Cohasset, Milton 
and Braintree. 

The basic concept of the 
program is to make help more 
accessable, to involve 



MSA MUSCULAR 
i DYSTROPHy 



communities in the treatment 
process and assist people to find 
needed services. Experienced 
alcoholism counselor staff the 
clinics and are available on a 
part-time basis in the evenings 
and some on Saturday mornings. 
The clinics offer individual, 
group and family counseling and 
make sure that clients seek and 
receive appropriate health and 
welfare services. Individual 
counseling gives supportive 
guidance, direction and 
emotional sustenance to the 
point where the person can 
grapple with the problem of 
his/her alcoholism. At the 
present time, reservations are 
being taken for a couple's group 
to be started in the near future. 



This will be for married couples 
who recognize their 
alcohol-related problems. 

The clinic works closely with 
the South Shore Council on 
Alcoholism, Alcoholics 
Anonymous, The Quincy 
Detoxification Center and other 
Alcoholism Units. The program 
is funded by the State Division 
on Alcoholism and is also 
supported by counseling fees 
which are based on the ability to 
pay. 

Anyone with an alcohol or 
alcohol-related problem may call 
the Adult Unit at South Shore 
Mental Health Center 
(471-0350) between 9 a.m. and 
5 p.m. to make an appointment 
or obtain more information. 



Sacrament Lesson- Sermon 
At Christian Science Church 



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"Sacrament" is the subject of 
Sunday's Lesson-Sermon at First 
Church of Christ, Scientist, 20 
Greenleaf St., Quincy. 

The Golden Text is from 
Hebrews 13:16: "To do good 
and to communicate forget not: 
for with such sacrifices God is 
well pleased." 



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Thursday, July 1 1 , 1974 Quincy Sun Page 19 



THE CHAMPIONS of the Junior All-Stars Bowling League, seated left to right, Bob Meenan, Bob Pizzi, 
Gary Walsh, Jerry Forde and Paul Smith. Standing are Jim Rendo of the Boston Astros pro soccer team, 
League Treasurer Burton Barzelay, Secretary Marjorie Walsh, Quincy High Basketball Coach Joe 
Amorosino and League Director Rick Palumbo. 

[Photo by Ludwigl 

Junior All-Stars Bowling League 
Presents Awards At Dinner 



The Junior All-Stars Bowling 
League recently held its 9th 
annual awards banquet with 
more than 250 attending at the 
Morrisette Legion Post. 

Trophies went to the 
members of the championship 
team, Gar\' Walsh, Bob Pi/.zi, 
Bob Meenan. Jerry Forde and 
Paul Smith. 

Walsh also received the high 



average trophy for bowling 
111.1. Other awards went to 
Stephen Salvati for high three of 
369. Shawn Dwyer for high 
single of 142, and Joiin Cerilli, 
who received the William 
Delahunt Award for best effort. 

The principal speaker was Jim 
Rendo of the Boston Astros pro 
soccer team. 



Other head table guests 
included Qumcy High Basketball 
Coach Joe .Amorosino, Rep. 
William Delahunt, a former 
league director; Mrs. John 
.Me/,/,etti, who presented the 
John Me//etli Memorial Award, 
and her son. John; League 
Secretary Marjorie Walsh. 
Treasurer Burton Bar/elay and 
Director Rickv Palumbo. 



Merrymounst Assn. Tennis, 
Basketball Winners Listed 



Merry mount Association 
crowned six winners at the 
Tennis Tournament Finals last 
Saturday. 

In the men's competition, 
William [Buzz] Connolly 
defeated Stewart Miller 6-2 and 
6-2. 

In the women's competition, 
Kathleen Bennett defeated 
Regina Hussey 6-4 and 6-4. 

Susan Coleman defeated 
Christine Cunniff 6-1 and 6-2 in 
the intermediate's match. 

Steven Feldman defeated 
George Lagos in intermediate 
competition 6-2 and 6-0. 

In the junior matches, Marcia 
Cunniff defeated Lisa Noe 6-2 
and 64 while Daniel Boyle 
defeated Thomas Connolly 3-6, 
6-4 and 6-1. 

In girl's basketball shooting, 



Bargain 
Basement 



ages 8-10, winners were Nancy 
Tolson, first place; Deborah 
Noe, second and Kathleen 
Flynn, third. 

Marcia Cunniff took first 
place in the 11-13 competition, 
with Patricia Irvine holding 
second and Kristin O'Gara third. 

Suzanne Clarke won first 
place in the 14 and over division. 
Carol Lynch placed second and 
Susan DelGaizo, third. 

In boy's basketball shooting, 
ages 8-10, winners were Ralph 
Terrazand, first place; James 
DePietro, second and Michael 
Hussey, third. 

Donald Murray took first 
place in the 11-13 competition 
followed by Carroll Coletti and 



William Foley. 

Kevin McCarthy won first 
place in the 14 and over division, 
followed by Richard Boyle and 
Steven Anderson. 



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Sports Section 

City's Swimming 
Program Schedule 



Following are the schedules 
for the Quincy Recreation 
Department's swimming and 
water ski instruction program: 

Swimming schedule: 

Monday, July 15 - high tide 
7:57, beach hours 8-12 
non-swim I & II 11 - 11:30, Adv 
beg. 10:30, intermediate 1 9:30 
intermediate II 10, swim 9:00 
advanced swim and lite saving 8 
9. 

Tuesday, July 16 - higli tide 
8:54, beach hours 8-12, beg. I 
11, beg. II 11:30, adv. beg. 
10:30, intermediate I 9:30, 
intermediate II 10, swim 9, 
advanced swim and lite saving 8 - 
9. 

Wednesday July 17 - high tide 
9:50, beach hours 8-1, 
non-swim 1 12, non-swim II 



12:30, beg I II, beg II II:;30, 
adv. beg. 10:30, intermediate I 
9:30, intermediate H 10, swim 
8, advanced swim and life saving 
8:30-9:30. 

Thursday July 18 - high tide 
10:46, beach hours 8-1, 
non-swim I 12, non-swim II 
12:30, beg. I 11, Beg. II 11:30, 
Adv. beg. 9, intermediate I 8, 
intermediate II 8:30, swim ":30, 
advanced swim and life saving 10 

- 11. 

Friday July 19 - high tide 
11:41, beach hours 9 - 2, 
non-swim I 1, non-swim II 1:30, 
beg. I 9, beg. II 9:30, adv. beg. 
12:30, intermediate I 10, 
intermediate II 10:30, swim 12, 
advanced swim and life saving 1 I 

- 12. 




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Page 20 Quincy Sun Thursday, July 1 1 , 1974 

St. John's Cadets 
Win 2 'Bombardments' 



St. John's CYO Cadet 
Baseball Team [Team A] 
defeated St. Gregory's of 
Dorchester 11-0 in 
Quincy-Boston CYO Deanery 
competition. 

In an exhibition game against 
the Koch All Stars of Quincy, 
St. John's took a 14-run lead but 
managed to survive a 12-run 
Koch comeback in a 
bombardment Saturday at 
O'Rourke playground. 

David DiGiusto was the 
winning pitcher in both games. 

St. John's closes out its season 
this week-end with a game 
Friday against the 73 CYO 



Cadet championship St. Peter's 
team at Kincaide Park. On 
Saturday St. John's A and B 
teams meet in a final showdown 
in Quincy Deanery competition 
at a field yet to be named. St. 
John's A team plays its final 
game against St. Gregory's 
Monday night at Dorchester 
Park. 

The game against St. Peter's 
of Dorchester, last year's 
champions and this year's 
front-runners will be a big test 
for the Quincy team which has 
been undefeated this season so 
far. 



Special Summer 
Courses At YMCA 



Special summer courses are 
being held by the Quincy YMCA 
this month and n€xt for 
members and non-members. 

The special interest courses 
include golf, 7 to 8:15 p.m. for 
7 weeks, July 1 1 - Aug. 23. 



Save Gas and Money 
shop locally. 



Other activities comprise 
pottery lessons, 7 to 9 p.m., six 
weeks, July 11 - Aug. 15; 
Handicrafted Jewelry, Mondays, 
8 to 8:30 p.m., five weeks, July 
22 -Aug. 19. 

Fuither information may be 
obtained from Norma Finnegan 
at the Quincy YMCA. The 
telephone number is 479-8500. 



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•Bantam House 

Bennett, Rooney, Kelly, 
Spark Whites, 4-3 



In the Bantam House League 
the White team edged the 
Greens, 4-3. 

Mike Bennett had two goals 
and Mark Rooney and John 
Kelly one each for the Whites. 
Bob Collins had two assists, 
Rooney, Pete Golden and Paul 
Zenga one apiece. 

For the Greens Bob Peters, 
Bunky Harte and Mike Soldano 
had the goals and Harte, 



Soldano, Paul Cooney and Dave 
Abbott assists. 

The Yellows nipped the 
Orange team, 3-2, with Bob 
Molloy scoring twice and 
Tommy Brennan once for the 
Yellows and Jim McHugh, Brian 
Hewitt, Bobby Hayes and 
Molloy assisting. For the Orange 
team Charles Hogan and Kevin 
McGrath had the goals and 
Bobby Brennan and Bud Hale 
assists. 



The Blues and Reds played to 
a 4-4 tie. Ken Kustka had two 
goals, Eddie Kane and Mike Van 
Tassell one each for the Blues. 
Russ DiPietro had two assists 
and Kustka one. For the Reds 
Sean Jago had two goals, Dave 
Lewis and Mike Bondarick one 
each with assists for John 
McConville, Chris Erikson, 
Bondarick, Steve White and 
Mark Donovan. 



• Midget House 

White, Orange Teams In Wins 



The Whites defeated the 
Greens, 6-4, in the Midget House 
League. 

Mike MacCauley had the hat 
trick for the Whites, Mark 
Paolucci had two goals and Dave 
Peters one. Joe McConville had 
two assists, Dave Previte, Dennis 
Walter and Tom Bamberry one 
apiece. 



For the Greens Joe Carty had 
two goals. Rich Troy and John 
Cavanaugh one each. Art Bertoni 
had two assists, Carty and 
Charlie Plunkett one each. 

The Orange team defeated the 
Reds, 6-4, with Marc Walsh 
having two Orange goals. Bill 
Morrison, Jeff Harrison, Rick 
Bowe and Kevin Doyle one each. 



Paul Flanders had two assists, 
Bowe, Walter Conley, Jim 
Constas, Doyle and Tom Parke 
one each. 

Mark KeUy had the hat trick 
for the Reds and Ed MacDonald 
the other goal. Dennis Dohcrty 
had two assists, Bud Monahan, 
Frank Shea and Jim McConville 
one each. 



•Executive League 

Greens, Reds, Blues, 
Golds Rack Up Wins 



The Green team defeated the 
Golds, 3-1, in Summer Executive 
Hockey League action at the 
Quincy Youth Arena. 

All the scoring came in the 
third period. Phil Clark scored 
the first Green goal with Bernie 
Toland assisting. Bob Kaulstron 
made it 2-0 with Clark and John 
Grossman assisting, and Bill 
Lewis scored the third goal with 
Fran Whalen and Frank 
McAuliffe having assists. Pete 
LeBerge scored for the Golds 



with Ed Holt assisting. 

The Reds walloped the Blues, 
6-0. Wally McLean scored in the 
first period with Jim Daley 
assisting. In the second period 
Daley scored with Joe Chase and 
Bucky Zanardelli having assists, 
and Jack Hurley scored with 
Daley assisting. In the final 
session Fran Moriarty scored 
with assists for Jack McDonald 
and Bill LaForest, LaForest 
scored with McDonald and Dick 
Reinhardt assisting, and Chase 



scored with Zanardelli and Bob 
Quintilliani assisting. 

Last week the Reds topped 
the Greens, 3-1, with Reinhardt, 
Zanardelli and McLean scoring 
for the Reds and Mike Collins 
and McLean having assists. Tom 
Boussy scored for the Greens. 

The Blues walloped the Golds, 
8-3, with Gary DeCoste scoring 
five goals. Jack Powers scored 
twice and Dave Hickey once. 
For the Golds Dave Towle, Ed 
Holt and Charlie Duffy scored. 



Mixed Action For Quincy Ixack Club 



The Quincy Track Club, with 
195 members signed up, will 
hold its second in a series of 
summer meets tonight 
[Thursday] at 6 p.m. at 
Veterans Memorial Stadium with 
several special features planned. 

In order to add fun to the 
meets, today's events will 
include girl sprinters running 
against weightmen, a four-girl 
relay team running against two 
bbys and a race between mixed 
relay teams comprising two boys 
and two girls. 

"Although we have 195 
members now, most are in the 



younge.' age brackets and we are 
looking for girls in their 20's and 
older and also older men," said 
Club Secretary Lou To/.zi, North 
Quincy coach who conduct;, tlie 
meets with Quincy Coach Tom 
Hall, also the club treasurer. "We 
would like to run masters events 



with men 40 and older and are 
also seeking men in their 
twenties and thirties". 

Members of the club continue 
to compete in weekly meets in 
Braintree and other places with 
good success. 



Junior Ski Club Offering 
Summer Sports Program 



The Massachusetts Junior Ski 
Club based i.i Needham is this 
summer for the first time 
offering a summer sports 
program for all teenagers in the 
suburban Route 128 area. 



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The club is planning to run a 
week-long Waterski Clinic on 
Lake Champlain. All groups will 
be accompanied by adult 
supervisors. Transportation will 
be provided from several pick-up 
points along Route 128. 
Participants should bring their 
own lunches and dress 
appropriately. Details and a 
copy of the schedule may be 
obtained from Rebecca 
Pepkowitz at the Mass. Junior 
Ski Club. The telephone number 
is 449-3074. 

•••••••• 

THE PRICE 
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Senior Summer League 

Newman Club 
Over Clovers, 8-4 



Thursday, July 1 1 , 1974 Quincy Sun Page 21 



The Quincy Clovers were 
walloped by the Newman Club, 
8-4, in the Quincy Summer 
Senior Hockey League at Quincy 
Youth Arena. 

Newman exploded for five 
goals in the final period to win. 
Quincy took a 3-1 lead in the 
first period on goals by Dennis 
O'Connell, Tom Morril and 
Frankie Guest. P. J. Flaherty, 
Bob Fowkes, Gene Farina and 
Charlie Ahern had assists. 
Newman tied it with two in the 
second and, after it scored twice 
in the finale, Quincy's O'Connell 
scored again with Fowkes 
assisting. 

In other games the undefeated 
Boston Budmen walloped the 
Walpole Chiefs, 8-2, and Atlantic 
Flames topped Whitman Cats, 
7-5. 



W L T Pts.GF GA* 

Boston 

Budmen 4 8 25 12 
Newman 

Club 2 1 1 5 24 19 
Atlantic 

Flames 2 2 4 19 19 
Quincy 

Clovers 2 2 4 17 19 
Whitman 

Cats 1 2 1 3 19 19 
Walpole 

Chiefs 4 11 26 



Atlantic's protest of a Quincy 
win two weeks ago was 
disallowed by league officials. 

Next week's games: Atlantic 
vs. Walpole, 6:30 p.m.; Whitman 
vs. Newman, 8:15, and Quincy 
vs. Boston, 10. 



Squirt House 

Ready Hat Trick 
Paces Whites, 7-4 



In the Squirt House League 
the White team defeated the 
Reds, 7-4. Bobby Ready had the 
hat trick for the Whites, Bill 
Bradley had two goals and Paul 
McCabe and Richie Milano one 
each. Rick Reardon and Brian 
Mock had two assists each, 
Milano, Kevin Mock, Mike 
Jordan, McCabe and Joe MeUa 
one each. Charles Duffy, Frank 
Reynolds, Tom Richards and 
Kevin Duff scored for the Reds 
with assists for Steve Bayhs, Ted 
Walsh, Jim Kutska, Billy Lawless 
and Dean Phillips. 

The Orange team won its first 
game, 5-4, over the Yellows as 
Kevin Tenney had the hat trick. 



Bill Marston scored the other 
two goals for the winners. 
Jonathan Beniers had three 
assists and Tenney one. For the 
Yellows Kevin Greene, Mike 
Cullen, Mike McArdle and Tom 
Schofield had the goals with 
Dennis Furtado and Cullen 
having two assists apiece and 
McArdle one. 

The Greens defeated the 
Blues, 3-1. Kevin Craig, Kevin 
Chase and Billy Gray had the* 
winners' goals and Tommy 
Murphy, Mike Chenette and 
Chase assists. Dick Mahoney 
scored for the Blues with Bud 
Ryan assisting. 



Quincy Golfers In 
CYO Tourney July 22 



Several Quincy golfers will 
compete in the 35th annual 
CYO open championship 
tournament July 22 to 26 at 
Ponkapoag Golf Course in 
Canton. 

Nick Roberts, defending 
Cadet Division champion from 
Cohasset, heads the entries in 
that bracket. Also in the field 
are Rick Thomas, Westwood, 
last year's Cadet runnerup. Peter 
Nash of Milton, twice finalist in 



the Hatherly Junior boys' event, 
and Frank MacSwain, South 
Weymouth, qualifier in both the 
CYO and New England Junior 
tournaments last year. 

The Junior Division field 
includes Paul Littlejohn of 
Braintree, 1973 Boston Glove 
champion and Braintree Golf 
Ass'n Junior champion, and 
Andy Morse, East Weymouth, 
runnerup in the N. E. Junior 
Open. 




STONE'S JEWELRY-PARKER TRANS., Pee Wee team of the St. Ann's Youth Hockey League. Front, 
left to right, Steve Burke, John Gorczyca, Paul Mallory, Ricky Stempkovski, John O'Leary, Brian 
Downing, Eddie McDonough, Bill Eastwick and Bob Sullivan. Back, John Hurley, Jim McDonough, 
Kevin McSweeney, Jeff Gale, Sean O'Brien, Paul Mahoney, John Doran, Asst. Coach Frank Musciulli and 
Coach John Hurley. 



Mite House 



Hurley Scores 6 As 
Reds Wallop Whites, 9-1 



. In the Mite House League the 
Red Team walloped the Whites. 
9-1. 

Chris Hurley exploded for six 
goals and Ed Fleming, Billy 
Hughes and Greg Keefe had one 
each. Hughes and Bill Glavin had 
two assists each. Glen Whelan, 
Tom Houlihan and Keefe one 
apiece. Brian Chase had the 
Whites' goal with Mark 



Chambers assisting. 

The Orange team defeated the 
Yellows, 6-2, on two goals by 
Danny Kelly and one each by 
Brian Ostiguy, Mark and Sean 
Loughman and Tim Barry. Sean 
Lough man had two assists and 
Ostiguy and Tommy Boussy one 
each. Paul Marshall had both 
Yellow goals with Bob Kane 



having an assist. 

The Blues defeated the 
Greens, 6-4, with Scott Messina 
having the hat trick. John 
Krantz had two goals and John 
DiPietro one for the winners and 
assists went to Krantz with two, 
Messina and DiPietro. Bobby 
McCabe had the hat trick for the 
Greens and Bobby Foreman the 
other goal. 



*Pee Wee House 



White, Green, Orange Win 



The White team walloped the 
Reds, 5-1, in the Pee Wee House 
League as Mark Messina and 
Dick Ryan had two goals each 
and Mike Barry one. 

Mike Quigg and Tom McHugh 
had two assists each, Messina, 
Billy Doran, Greg Freeman, Ed 
Powers and Ryan one each. 
Johnny Toland scored for the 
Reds with Robbie Zanardelli and 
Karl Nord assisting. 

The Greens defeated the 
Blues, 5-2, with Chuckie 
Marshall and Paul McConville 
scoring twice each and. Paul 
Dunphy once. Kevin 
McCormack had two assists, 
Marshall. John Kelley, Paul 



McGrath, Joe Carroll and 
Dunphy one each. Dick 
McCarthy and John Lyons 

scored for the Blues and 
McCarthy and Bob Currier had 
assists. 

The Orange teahi walloped 
the Yellows, 94, as Scoll 
Richardson erupted for five 
goals. Gene Kornse, Danny 



Flynn, John BayJis and Brian 
Sullivan had the other goals. 
Flynn had four assists, Ed 
Campbell three, Sullivan and 
Kornse one each. Bobby Beniers 
had the hat trick for the Yellows 
and Jim Paolucci the other goal. 
Bob Welch, Chris Chevalier, 
Tony Chiochio and Tommy 
Heffernan had assists. 



Gilmartin, Keough Win 
Governor's Cup At FB 



Joe Gilmartin and Dan 
Keough defeated Roy 
Christiansen and Jack Shields to 
win the Governor's Cup at 
Furnace Brook Golf Club. 



Keougli birdied the 10th hole 
and Gilmartin birdied the 12th. 
Gilmartin made a soft putt for a 
par to close out the match on 
the 15th hole. 



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ttge 11 Quincy Sun Thursday, July 1 1 , 1974 




• Junior Baseball 

Rotary, Kiwanis, 
Keohane's, Sears, Win 



THE QUINCY POLICE Boys Club is leading the Quincy Babe Ruth League. Front, left to right. Bill 
Qakes Tom Brennan, Fran Donovan, Larry Baker, John Ferris, Jim Burm and Ed Laracy. Back, Coach 
Dick Laracy Chuckie LoPresti, Richie Boyle, Lou Fishman, Mike Murphy, Mike Boyle, Ron Donovan 
and Brian Connolly. Missing from photo are John Andrews and Assistant Coach Shorty Donovan. 

• Babe Ruth League 

Police Club In 2 Easy Wins 



The Police Club rolled to two 
easy Quincy Babe Ruth League 
wins during the past week, 
walloping Houghs Neck, 14-2, 
and VFW, 1 7-4. 

Against Houghs Neck, Lou 



Fishman was the winning pitcher 
and had nine strikeouts. John 
Ferris had a three-run triple and 
single, Brian Conley had three 
hits and John Andrews and 
Richie Boyle two each. 



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Against VFW, Ronny 
Donovan was the winning 
pitcher. Fishman was 
four-for-four including a double, 
Chuck LoPresti had a triple and 
single, Ed Laracy a double and 
single, Mike Murphy two singles 
and Conley a three-run triple. 

Granite City Electric defeated 
Elks, 9-3, with winning pitcher 
Steve Doyle striking out nine 
and driving in four runs himself. 
Dave Raftery had two singles 
and Bob Stark a triple. 



Rotary edged Foley's, 3-2, in 
tke Quincy Junior Baseball 
League, as Brian Donovan 
pitched a four-hitter. 

Richie Finnegan played an 
outstanding game in center field. 
Bob Pettinelli drove in the 
winning run with a single. Tony 
Camillo had a double and single, 
Buddy Cappola two singles and 
Mike Ford, Donovan and 
Pettinelli a single each. 

For Foley's John Cavanaugh 
had a double and single. Perry 
Hogan and Billy Foley a single 
apiece. John Sullivan was the 
losing pitcher. 

Rotary also, defeated Sears, 
6-1, with Gary DiNardo pitching 
a three-hitter. Billy Burt, the 
catcher, and Camillo at first base 
turned in outstanding defensive 
plays. Donovan had a double 
and drove in three runs, DiNardo 
had a double and John Costigan 
and Finnegan singles. 

For Sears, Billy Sullivan, Dave 
Zoia and Kenny Mann had the 
hits. Mann also pitched in relief 
of Steve Picott. Zoia was 
outstanding behind the plate. 

Kiwanis defeated Burgin 
Platner, 8-3, with James Walsh 
the winning pitcher and Billy 
O'Malley his catcher. 

Keohane's nipped Houghs 
Neck, 2-1, on Andy Carrera's 
two-hitter. Keohane's took the 
lead in the third inning on a 
double by Brian Reale and 
Carrera's single. Houghs Neck 
tied it in the fifth on a single by 



AMERICAN LEAGUE 

"W L 



Sears 


13 


5 


Houghs Neck 


12 


6 


Boston Gear 


9 


8 


Foley's 


6 


11 


Burgin Platner 


5 


14 


Remick's 


1 


17 


NATIONAL 


LEAGUE 




W 


L 


Keohane's 


14 


5 


Kiwanis 


13 


4 


VFW 


11 


6 


Rotary 


11 


7 


Colonial Federal 


9 


9 


Elks 


3 


15 



Gary Oriola and a double by 
Chris Abboud, 

Keohane's pulled off a double 
play to end the inning and won 
it in the sixth on a passed ball 
with the bases loaded. Carrera 
had a double and single, Tom 
Mullen two singles, Reale a 
double and Mark Jaehnig a 
single. For Houghs Neck, 
Abboud's double and Oriola's 
single were the only hits. 

Sears walloped VFW, 10-0 
with Billy Deitsch hitting a 
home run. 

VFW topped Foley's, 9-7, 
with Paul O'Toole the winning 
pitcher. 

Other scores: Colonial Federal 
Savings 6, Sears 3; and Colonial 
9, Burgin Platner 8. 

The standings: 



eSenior Babe Ruth 



Quincy Drops 3 In Row 



Quincy's entry in the South 
Shore Senior Babe Ruth League, 
Data Services, had a bad week, 
losing three games in a row. 

Sunday Quincy had one of its 
worst days as it bowed to 
Hingham, 12-4, Hingliam scoring 
all its runs in the first three 
innings. Quincy committed six 
errors and many errors of 
omission, as it suffered its fourth 
straight loss. 

Gerry Bugden and Dave 
Power had hits each for Quincy, 
Bugden having a triple and 
Power a double. 



In its previous game Quincy 
dropped a 2-1 squeaker to 
Hanover as a bad hop single gave 
Hanover the win in the first 
extra inning. Bugden had 12 
strikeouts in another fine 
pitching performance and also 
had a ground rule double. 
Quincy left 1 1 runners on base. 
Power and. Skip Cooney had two 
hits each. 

Earlier- Quincy was edged by 
South Boston Two, 3-2. Power 
made' a great bid in the last 
inning when his towering fly was 
caught against the fence at 



Adams Field to end the game 
with the tying run on second. 

Paul Messina had two singles 
and turned in several fine 
defensive plays at third base. 
Bugden had a triple. Quincy 
again failed in the clutch as it 
left eight men on base. 

Power leads the Quincy 
batters with a 4.21 average and a 
.685 slugging average. Messina 
has a .393 average and .500 
slugging percentage. Bugden is 
the leading pitcher with a 3-1 
record and a 1.40 earned run 
average. 



•Legion Baseball 



Morrisette Meets Hingham, 
Wollaston, Quincy In Action 



Morrisette Legion's baseball 
team, with its Zone 6 hopes 
buoyed by two straight losses 
last week for Weymouth's 
defending champions, will play 
at Hingham Friday at 6. The 
club will host league-leading 
Braintree in a big game Monday 
at 8 at Adams Field and will 
play at Milton next Wednesday 
at 6. 

Other Zone 6 games will find 
Wollaston hosting Canton 
tonight [Thursday] at 8 at 
Adams, Quincy entertaining . 
Weymouth Friday at 8 at 



Adams,' 'Quincy 'playing ^^ 
Hingham and WOllaston at 
Milton Monday al\6, Quincy 
facing Canton Tuesday at 8 at 
Adanis : and , Qujncy hosting 
Woliastoh next Wedheisday at 8 
at Adains.:" ; ' .'., , . 

Morrisette' raiised its ^record to 
6-3 M<i;iday night'witli a 6-3 win 
over Quincy undiiBrtliie lights at 
Adams Field/. • ■■.•'■ .• ' • 

Quincy tciok a 1-0 lead, in the 
top of the spcbnd'^ojp^a.vvalk to 
Steve Melie, afieldfers; ichoice and 
: a sinjgle' by Mike li^yijip., ' . • ; 

Moririsiette tied- it irt its Ha)f 6n 




Tiiivts:o)iiA?nM«et: 

C*Nkoi* ilio« Id, , 



SOUTH SttORI 

FACTORY SERVICE 



FOR 



RCA-M0TR0LA-SYLVANIA-2ENITH 
ADMIRAL-MASTERWORKS 

Call 479*1350 



a single by John Lawlor, a 
sacrifice by Dennis McGuire and 
a single by Frank Miceli. 

Morrisette scored twice in the 
fourth on singles by Mike 
McKenzie and Dave Perdios, a 
walk and a fielders choice. 

Quincy battled back to tie it 
with two in the fifth on four 
walks by Tim Clifford and a 
fielders choice. 

Morrisette scored the winning 
run in the fifth when Mike- 
DePaolo reached on a fielder's 
choice, Lee Watkins ran for him 
and stole second, continuing to 
third when the catcher threw 
into center field and scored on 
McGuire's single. Morrisette 
added two insurance runs in the 
sixth when Clifford reached on 
an error. Jack Rabel doubled to 
left, Watkins beat out a hit to 
shortstop scoring Clifford and 
Rabel scored on a bad throw by 
the shortstop. 

Oifford pitched a four-hitter, 
struck out seven and walked six. 
Mele was touched up for 10 hits, 
struck out three and walked five. 

Quincy last week blanked 
MUton, 2-0, on a two-hitter by 
Bob Sten. 




Thursday, July 1 1 , 1974 Quincy Sun Page 23 



By JOE MOSESSO 

The Quincy Recreation 
Department's summer program 
got underway last week on an 
"up" note. 

According to Recreation 
Director William F. Ryan, 
registration for all recreation 
programs was up from last year. 

Nature specialists Paula 
Weidmann and Michael Parros 
opened their program with some 
new activities. At O'Rourke, 
terrariums were made. Some of 
the participants were Diane 
Depolo, Susan Morrison and 
Steven Heliotas. At Stoney Brae, 
children made coal gardens. 
Some of the most interesting 
were done by Michelle Cleary, 
Liza Mulkern, Linda Powers and 
Theresa Big'ana. Other popular 
nature activities held during the 
week were bug hunting and 
hiking. 

Golf specialist Don Smith 
welcomed all returning veterans 
and some newcomers to his golf 
program this past week. Some of 
the vets returning were 
LaBrecque's Mark Aboud, Tom 
Bussey and David Rhode, Paula 
Morrison, Donna O'Neil and Pat 
McPhillips of Snug Harbor and 
Wollaston's Steve Plate, Paul 
Lavas and Bruce Brennan. Dan 
MoUay and Paul McConville 
were two newcomers who 
showed promise. 

As in past years the arts and 
crafts program has always been a 
big favorite of the children. 
Specialists Gina Kelley and 
Darlene D'Olympio report that 
this years program is no 
different. This week, 
concentration was on the 
making of popsicle stick jewelry 
boxes. A few of the more 
creative children in the parks 
were Ann Marie Cicerone, 
Michel Breen and Claudra 
Battistone of Pond St. and Elm 
St.'s Steve Pricella and Gary 
McDonald. 

Archery specialist Tim Flynn 
reports that there has been a 
great turnout around the city 
thus far for the archery program. 
Special congratulations go to 
Jimmy Anderson of Myles 
Standish for the first bullseye of 
the season. Other fine marksmen 
were Mike Alcott and Josh 
Aberti of Squantum, Faxon 
Park's Kathy O'Toole and 
Michele Martin, Mike Lupo of 
Snug Harbor and Jimmy 
Princiota of Pond Street. 

Tennis has been an 
increasingly popular sport of 
late. The Recreation 
Department's tennis program 
substantiates this fact. Tennis 
specialists Kevin McGinley and 
Betty Vittner report there has 
been an overwhelming number 
of tennis enthusiasts on the 
playgrounds. Future Chris Everts 
and Jon Newcombes in our 
midst are Mike Ayles and John 
Flate of Forbes Hill, Faxon 
Field's Rich Finnegan, Chris 
Cully and John Todd, Ray 
Mallory and Joe Phelan of 
Merrymount and Dana 
Mastrocol and Robin Lindberg 
of Welcome Young. 

Leading the city's youth in 
melodious song this season is 
music specialist Karen Walsh, 
who says she is "quite pleased" 
with the large turnout of music 
appreciators around the city. 
Some of the leading songsters 
are Chrissy O'Brien and Nancy 
Tolson of Perkins, Faxon Field's 



Sue Finnegan, Terry Mahoney 
arid Maureen Cully and 
Kincaide's James Anderson and 
Cindy Bureau. 

On the playgrounds this past 
week, in between visits from 
the speciaUsts, there were many 
interesting and innovative 
activities being held. At 
Welcome Young many 
ecology-minded children 
participated in a massive cleanup 
of the playground. Debbie 
Peterson, Susie Nee and Dana 
Mastrocola were among the 
cleanup gang. Elm St. held a 
puppet show. Stars of the show 
were Donna Franceschini, Patty 
Barry and Karen Dinardo. At 
Baker a girls-boys softball game 
was held with the male 
chauvinists prevailing 29-11. 
Standouts for the victors were 
Kevin Park, Scott Mathews and 
Jimmy Megnia while Trisha 
Craig and Kathy Megnia starred 
for the defeated. 

At Harboiview an insect safari 
was the big hit of the week. 
Tracy Sontag put her 
imagination to good use and 
built an apartment for a termite, 
complete with a crab shell easy 
chair, the latest rock marble 
dining table and a refrigerator 
stocked with delectable rotten 
wood for lunch time. Up at Snug 
Harbor a butterfly hunt took 
place. Those leading the field on 
the hunt were Kevin Williams, 
Harry Williams and Kevin Smith. 
And, speaking of hunting, the 
biggest catch of the year has to 
go to Mike Petrillo of 
Quarterdeck playground for his 
snagging of a five foot bull 
snake. 



There were no games 
scheduled in any of the 
playgrounds sports leagues 
during the first week of the 
summer program. Teams around 
the city, though, practiced 
diligently all week in preparation 
for their openers. Some of the 
teams to watch this season are 
Wollaston, Faxon Field, Forbes 
Hill and Mass Fields in girls 
Softball. Shea Rink and 
Wollaston should vie for the 
championship in girls basketball. 
In boys baseball in the midget 
division, Merrymount and 
Welcome Young look like the 
favorites. In junior baseball 
O'Rourke, pollard and Bayside 
are going to be tough to beat. In 
senior baseball Montclair is the 
pre-season pick, while in junior 
basketball Atlantic may take it 
all and finally in senior 
basketball Perkins and 

Merrymount should fight for the 
crown. 

Up at Happy Acres Day 
Camp, Camp Director Earl 
Vermillion and his fine staff are 
once again doing another 
marvellous job. They have put 
together a wealth of interesting 
activities and events for the 
campers. Last week some of the 
activities held were frisbee golf, 
bocce, a trip to the Coca Cola 
factory, birdhouse building, 
archery and trampoUne jumping. 
Some of the participants were 
Tim Jones, Ellen Birchmore, 
Paul Starke, John Disalvo, Al 
Cook, Ruthie Qark, Mary 
O'Brien, Susie Rosenberg, David 
McMahan, James Conely, 
Audrey Burgess and Regina 
Faillace. 

Next week we'll take a look at 
some of the sports action around 
the city and how the boating 
and sailing program is going. 



•Around The Buoys 

Kluger SYC Winner, 
QYC To Try Again 



By JAMES COLLINS 

Norm Kluger's "Betty Ann" 
was the first of seven yachts to 
cross the finish line in the 
12-mile windward-leeward 
course off the Squantum Yacht 
Club on Saturday, 

She defeated Jim Beaton's 
"Dream Awhile" by 2 min. 05 
seconds. 

In the Turnabout Division 
Marget Durkin's No. 1558 eked 
out a victory over Tom Gwynn's 
No. 1665 by 58 seconds. 

The summary: Flying Scot 
Class, Betty Ann, Norm Kluger, 
2-35-00; Dream Awhile, Jim 
Beaton, 2-37-05; Brandy, Gabe 



Perez, 2-45-00. Other finishers 

were No, 1611, John Brown; No 
Nuf fin's. Art Sweeney; No. 
2422, Bob Montgomery, and 
2454, Earl Sutherland. 

Turnabout Class, No. 1558, 
Margaret Durkin, 1-32-00; No. 
1665, Tom Gwynn, 1-33-42; and 
No. 1433, Nick Renzulli, 
M5-00. 

Light air which left the fleet 
of seven yachts stranded over a 
mile from the finish line caused 
postponement of the 
Thunderbird Class race off the 
Quincy Yacht Club until a later 
date. 



The fleet left the starting line 
off the Quincy Yacht Club at 
10:40 A.M. for the race to the 
Boston Lightship, a distance of 
1 8 nautical miles. 

Past Commodore C, Willis 
Garey arid his committee plan to 
reschedule the race possibly later 
in the season when the wind is 
stronger. 

The prizes for the first boat to 
finish, the Commodore Bernard 
McCourt trophy and the first 
boat from the Quincy Yacht 
Qub to finish, the Amos L. 
Merritt trophy in the shape of a 
silver bowl and a silver plate 
have been placed in the vault of 
the Quincy Yacht Club. 



Boating, Sailing Opens Friday 



The Quincy Recreation 
Department's Boating and 
Sailing program opens Friday. 

Registration is now being held 
daily from 9 a.m. until 4 p.m. at 
Black's Creek Boathouse located 
just off the Southern Artery in 
Merrymount Park. 

According to Recreation 
Director, William F. Ryan, 
instructional classes will be 
offered from 9 a.m. until 4 p.m., 
Mondays through Fridays for 
youths who have passed a 
qualifying swim test and are 
between the ages of 8 and 16. 



Classes on rowing and sailing 
from beginner to advanced levels 
will continue for an eight week 
period during July and August. 
Ryan added that interested 
applicants may take the 
qualifying swim test at any of 
the 13 swim stations located 
throughout the city. 

The program emphasis 
continues to be on the 
importance of safe boating and 
the need of people of all ages to 
acquire and refine basic skills in 
this increasingly popular 
pastime. The Red Cross 



Water Ski Schedule 



DATE 



TIDE 



TIME 



4:52 p.m. 

5:38 p.m. 

8:17 a.m. 

8:54 a.m. 

9:50 a.m. 
10:46 a.m. 
11:41 a.m. 

2:18 p.m. 12 

3:10p.m 

402 p.m. 

4:58 p.m. 

5:53 p.m. 

8:31 a.m. 

9:29 a.m. 
10:19 a.m. 
11:03 a.m. 
1 1:44 a.m. 

1:34 p.m. 

2: 1 1 p.m. 

2:50 p.m. 

3:30 p.m. 

4:13 p.m. 

6:51 p.m. 

7:5 1 p.m. 

8:29 a.m. 

9:29 a.m. 
10:25 a.m. 



3-7 

3:30-7:30 
7:30- 10:15 



7:30- 
8- 12 
8:45- 
9:45 - 
4 



Thursday, July 1 1 

Friday, July 12 

Monday, July 15 

Tuesday, July 16 

Wednesday, July 17 

Thursday, July 18 

Friday, July 19 

Monday, July 22 

Tuesday, July 23, 

Wednesday, July 24 

Thursday, July 25 

Friday, July 26 

Monday, July 29 

Tuesday, July 30 

Wednesday, July 31 

Thursday, August 1 

Friday, August 2 

Monday, Aug. 5 

Tuesday, Aug. 6 

Wednesday, Aug. 7 

Thursday, Aug. 8 

Friday, Aug. 9 

Monday, Aug. 12 

Tuesday, Aug. 13 

Wednesday, Aug. 14 

Thursday, Aug. 15 

Friday, Aug. 16 

Monday, Aug. 1 9 Water Carnival Practice 

Tuesday, Aug. 20 - Annual Water Carnival 



11 

12:45 
1:45 



1-5 

2-6 

3-7 

3:30-7:30 

7:30- 10:30 

7:30- 11:30 

8- 12 

9-2 

9:45 - 1:45 

11:30-3:30 

12-4 
1 -5 

1:30-5:30 
2:15-6:15 
5-7:30 
5:30-7:30 
7:30- 10:30 
7:30- 11:30 
8:30- 12:30 



BEACH 

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Mound St. 

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Nickerson 

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Nickerson 

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Fenno 

Nickerson 

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MODELS IN STOCK 



OUTBOARD MOTOR MART 

Quincy Shore Drive No. Quincy 328-61 10 

Open 7 Days 



approved course deals with boat 
nomenclature, knot tying, 
rowing, launching and docking. 
Upon successful mastery of basic 
seamanship skills, participants 
progress to sail boats and receive 
Red Cross certificates after 
successfully completing each 
course. 

Adults may take advantage of 
their leisure time and sail from 4 
p.m. until 8 p.m. each weekday 
or take the entire family saiHng. 
Adult and family sailing is 
offered Saturdays from 10 a.m. 
to 3 p.m. and on Sundays from 
noon to 6 p.m. 

Those desiring instruction 
may make individual 
appointments by contacting 
Barry Welch, Director of the 
Boating and Sailing program at 
the Black's Creek Boathouse. 





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SOtolOil $11.95 
All Instruments 20% Off 

Fire Extinguisher $ 9.95 

Life Jackets $ 4.29 
Propellers 15% Off 

Bilge Pumps $16.95 

VHF Radios 299.95 

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Page 24 Quincy Sun Thursday, July 11, 1974 

Wows ^Em At Cohasset 



Benny Goodman's Crown Still Intact 



By HENRY BOSWORTH 

He was proclaimed the "King 
of Swing" in the 1930's and in 
the 40-odd years since, his 
crown has remained firmly 
intact. 

Benny Goodman at 65, still 
plays a clarinet like it was 
invented especially form him. 
Or, he for it. 

The king got a royal reception 
from a capacity audience at the 
South Shore Music Circus 
Sunday night: a standing ovation 
as he stepped on stage and 
another one an hour and a half 
later as the crowd reluctantly let 
him leave. 

In between, it was 
fool-tapping, finger-snapping 
and head-bobbing time for the 
appreciative audience as 
Goodman and seven other highly 
talented musicians swung their 
stuff-together and solo. 

At an early point, 
Goodman-because of the 
humidity-asked if the audience 
minded if he and the boys took 
their jackets off. The crowd 
cheered them on. 

And at that early point, he 
had the audience so neatly 
wrapped in the palm of his hand 
that if he had asked if they 
minded if he held up the box 
office, someone would have 
politely got up and got him a 
gun. 

But there was an interesting 
holdup, you might say, when 
Goodman discarded his suit 
jacket and bared the fact he 
holds his trousers up with red 
suspenders. 

The suspenders, and the boys 
working in shirt sleeves turned 
the Cohasset circus tent into an 
informal jam session-hke setting 
with the crowd loving every 




Joey Heatherton^ Nipsey Russell 
At Cohasset Tent July 15-30 

Joey Heatherton, show a Crack" with Gary Merrill. 



BENNY GOODMAN 

minute of it. 

The audience actually got a 
bonus. Goodman and his group 
were advertised as a sextet. But 
an octet showed up. And quite 
an octet: Buck Pizzarelle on 
guitar; Ronny Bedford, drums; 
Slam Stewart, bass; John Bunch, 
piano; Zoot Sims, sax; George 
Masso, trombone and Chris 
Griffen, trumpet. The latter, 
Goodman noted, had appeared 
with him at Carnegie Hall. 

They had the crowd 
applauding as they played 
together and as each got to do a 
solo or two. 

A heavy downpour beating on 
the tent roof [and a little 
dripping in] failed to dampen 
the enthusiasm. "That's what 
you call the big rhythm section 
in the sky," mused Goodman as 
the rains came down. 

Sims did a pretty "Up The 
Lazy River" and Stewart had his 
bass almost singing "Do Nothing 
Until You Hear From Me". 
Griffen really got started with "I 



Can't Get' Started". Masso's 
"The One I Love Belongs To 
Someone Else" was a nice 
contribution. 

And Pizzarelle made you 
think of a guitar as a pretty 
musical instrument again and 
not a rock 'n roll bulldozer. His 
"The Rest of My Life" was 
sweet stuff. 

The crowd-mostly in their 
late 40's and over with a few 
exceptions-couldn't get enough 
of Goodman himself, iiowever. 
He played some of his real 
swinging fast stuff, but the old 
standards like "Stompin' At The 
Savoy", "Avalon", "By Mier 
Bistu Schoen", "Poor 
Butterfly", "Honeysuckle 
Rose", really sent 'em. 

If there was any 
disappointment it was in the fact 
that Goodman didn't play more 
of his classics like "Don't Be 
That Way", "One O'clock 
Jump", "Let's Dance", "You 
Turned The Tables On Me", 
"Sing, Sing", "And The Angels 
Sing", etc. 

In fact, there were calls from 
the audience for some of them. 
And as you listened to this 
talented octet you couldn't help 
but long to see Benny Goodman 
fronting a big band again and 
swinging out those oldies but 
goodies. 

They say that when Goodman 
was nine, and living in Chicago, 
he went to the local synagogue 
where instruments were being 
lent out to children. And, as the 
story goes, they gave him a 
clarinet because he was too small 
for a tuba. 

That was a lucky day for all 
of us. But you can't help 
wondering what this man might 
have done with a tuba. 



show 

business veteran since she was a 
teenager and Nipsey Russell, 
television's resident funny man, 
will be sharing the bill at the 
South Shore Music Circus, July 
15-30. 

Shows will be from Monday 
through Friday at 8:30 p.m. 
and on Saturday at 5:30 and 9 
p.m. Miss Heatherton sings, 
dances, and acts. Just having 
finished in Las Vegas she is now 
at the Colonic CoUseum in New 
York. 

Her career began at the age of 
13 when she was commissioned 
to do a telethon with Richard 
Rogers. She appeared in "The 
Sound of Music" with Mary 
Martin. She also appeared on 
Broadway in "There was a little 
girl" for Josh Logan "Harold" 
with Tony Perkins; and "Step on 



She also appeared on many 
television shows. In the spring of 
1972 she played opposite 
Richard Burton as his child bride 
in "Bluebeard". 

Russell who has many 
specialties has been dancing 
since he was three years old in 
his home town of Atlanta, Ga. 

With an M.A. from the 
University of Cincinnati Nipsey 
spends most of what spare time 
he has reading and writing 
poetry. Since June 6 he has been 
hosting Dean Martin's "Comedy 
World"; flying between the West 
Coiwt and New York taping next 
season's television spectaculars. 

These include "To Tell The 
Truth", "Password", "Pyramid", 
and a premiere in the Game 
World, "Masquerade Party", 



27th Koch Club 
Family Picnic Sunday 



The 27th annual Koch Club 
Family Picnic will be held 
Sunday from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. 
at Pageant Field, Merrymount 
Park. 

All Koch Club members, 
families, and friends are 
welcome to attend and 
participate in the events. Each 
family may bring their own 
lunch or may attend after lunch 
or dinner at home. 

Informal ball games and 
activities will be conducted 
between 10 a.m. and 1 p.m. 
Races will be held at 1:30 p.m., 
home run hitting contests for 
boys nnd girls at 2 p.m., mother 



and daughter and father and son 
baseball games and softball 
games at 2:30 p.m. The highlight 
of the afternoon will be an egg 
throwing contest at 3:30 p.m. 
between fathers and mothers. 

Ice cream will be served to 
children during the afternoon. 
Prizes will be awarded to 
winners of races and contests by 
Richard J. Koch, executive 
director, and his staff. 

This year the Koch Club with 
a membership of 3,500 members 
and supporters is celebrating its 
26th anniversary with a series of 
community events. 



John (lovanna) Balbo Lions International President 



Paul Clasby Elected 
President Of MAHC 



John Balbo, 61, the world 
light heavyweight' wrestling 
champion in 1949 who is better 



AL'S DRIVE IN 
RESTAURANT 

308 Quincy Ave. - Rte. 53 
A & W Root Beer 

Fried Clams Fried Chicken 

Onion Rings French Fried 

Basket of Shrimp 

►Complete Dinners ©Sandwiches 
Food Take Out Service 

Open: 5 A.M. - 1 1 P.M. 



known to Quincy residents as 
Johnny lovanna, star fullback 
for Quincy High School and the 
Quincy Manets some years back 
has become the international 
president of the million member 
Lions Club. 

He was installed in his new 
position at the Lions 57th 
annual convention in San 
Francisco. Now a resident of 
Oak Brook, 111., he moved from 
Quincy to the Midwest where he 
continued his wrestling career. 
He became the world's light 
heavyweight champion in Des 
Moines, Iowa, in 1949. 



Balbo plans to travel 
world-wide in promoting 
Lionism from the ranks of blue 
collar workers and young men. 

A Lion since 1952 Balbo was 
elected in 1965 to a two year 
term as director of Lions 
International which has 
affiliated clubs in 146 nations. 



Blinstrub's 

OldC 
H 







ouse 



760IVORRISSEY BLVD. 
DORCHESTER 282-7700 




EtJrERTAlNMtNT 
^^ NIGHTLY 

IN THE .^_ 
FIRESIDELOUNGE 



125 SEA ST. .QUINCY 471-1623 



The Massachusetts 
Association for Handicapped 
Children [M.A.H.C.J has elected 
a Quincy man president for the 
coming year. . 

Paul F. Clasby of Quincy was 
elected president. Elected board 
members were Thomas 
Brownell, Edward Graham, John 
Irvine, James Mulcahy and 
Richard Ward. 

Any individual wishing to 

■■■■■■■■■■i^KmHi 



contribute time or money to the 
association, is asked to call 
Clasby at 773-7098. All 

donations made individually or 
by firms are tax-deductable. The 

M.A.H.C. consists of only 
voluntary help, so all 
contributions made to the 

association will be used solely to 
forward the aims of the 
organization, it was noted. 




mmmmm mmMMMK m mm 

mimmBIWIf 



<nk^ ^'^^^'^^[J^ ^^JKMil^mmm^mJFm^llF^ 



^v^^i'^^; V*' '"' 



^o\., _ Presented 



ao 



^ 



,\3V'i 



by 







l>»*rjM QBIONAL ASKtX::iATIl-)f\J 



Good Old Fashioned Savings And Fun For Everyone 



.'30] 



* Children's Zoo 

* Judo Exhibition 

* Magician Act 

* Clydesdales 

* Fire Engine Rides 



* Snake Demonstration 

* Banjo Band 

* The Renegades 

* Square Dancing 

* Band Concert 



MISS QUINCY BAY RACE WEEK PAGEANT 
FRIDAY EVENING JULY 19th 9:30p.m. 



Thursday, July 1 1 , 1974 Quincy Sun Page 25 




r'kififiic 



Master Builders Seek Voice 
In Construction Survey 



****** 

wwwwww 



Young 



By JAMES M. 
WOODARD 

Changing trends in land de- 
velopment concepts were 
clearly indicated at the super- 
active liand Exchange Cen- 
ter, one of the most popular 
exhibits at the recent Builder- 
Developer Conference and 
Exposition, held in Chicago. 

Thirty real estate firms 
from points throughout the 
country participated in the 
center's program. Owners, 
builders and developers had a 
chance to get their heads to- 
gether in private consultation 
booths to discuss and ex- 
change plans and ideas for fu- 
ture projects. 

A changing scene in real es- 
tate developments of the fu- 
ture was a general consensus 
of all the long and sometimes 
heated dialogue — after the 
verbiage and smoke cleared 
away from the talk cubicles. 

One noted trend applied pri- 
marily to young married cou- 
ples and families. In a revital- 
ized pioneer spirit, they are 
increasingly seeking out a 
residence in older rural com- 
munities and in compact new 
developments which retain a 
"village" or "small town" 
charm. Like our country's 
early settlers, many young 
families in 1974 are striving 
for simple, natural pleasures 
in their home and community. 

This increasing desire to 
enjoy a life-style reflecting a 
basic "back to earth" philoso- 
phy is affecting new and 
planned residential develop- 
ments — apartments, condo- 
miniums and single family 
homes. It is producing a 



OPEN HOUSE 

seek rura 



growing demand for land in 
rural and small-town areas 
where modern conveniences 
can be offered. Builders are 
moving into rural-style 
"planned unit developments" 
where residents can live and 
work in a congenial setting 
away from the hustle and 
hassle of city life. 

This trend is giving a great 
boost to the economic health 
of many small towns, it was 
pointed out by one knowledge- 
able observer, Durand A. 
Holladay, managing trustee 
of Continental Mortgage In- 
vestors of Boston, the nation's 
largest independent real es- 
tate investment trust in mort- 



I 



areas 



gage lending. "New families 
in small towns swell tax reve- 
nues. The communities, in 
turn, can offer higher quality 
schools, services and mainte- 
nance. It's a welcome bonus, 
in today's scene of rapidly ris- 
ing costs," he said. 

Also, more people would 
be employed in nonmanufac- 
turing jobs and local bank de- 
posits would grow by $2.45 
million. As Holladay noted, 
community growth translates 
into more jobs, more reve- 
nues and general vitality. 
That's a frequent-scene as 
modern-day pioneers .set out 
on their quest for a new way of 
life. 



The Quincy Master Builders 
Association has asked 
Congressman James A. Burke to 
help steer a portion of $33,000 
in federal funds toward small 
businessmen. 

The money is to be spent on a 
survey that will study the cost 
and benefit of new apartments 
in the city and determine their 
effect on the "quality of life in 
the community." 

Said QMBA President Roger 
B. l[.yons in a letter to Burke: 

'The Quincy Master Builders 
Association would be very 
happy to have a full survey of 
Quincy's growth, but "it should 
not be restricted to large 
apartments, but to all new 
buildings. 

"Our organization, consisting 



of small business men investing 
with private capital, have been 
greatly restricted since the new 
zoning ordinance was adopted 
on March 22, 1971. 

"City officials have received 
our suggestions at different 
times over the years, but have 
taken no positive action. 

"The Planning Department, 
responsible for creating the new 
zoning ordinance, should not 
now arbitrate their mistakes by 
being judge and jury. 

"The Quincy Master Builders 
Association would like to 
contribute to an orderly growth 
of the City of Quincy, and 
believe it should have 
representation on this special 
study committee." 



$369,050 In New Wiring 



3 Brokers Join Jack Conway Staff 



Three South Shore brokers 
have recently joined the staff of 
Jack Conway and Company, 
New England's largest residential 
real estate brokers, announces 
John Reardon, vice president of 
sales. 

Mrs. Carole L. Duguay of 
North Weymouth will be a 
member of the staff of the 
Quincy office. She is a member 
of the School Committee. 

Mrs. Marlene F. Calogiro of 
North Weymouth has also been 
assigned to the Quincy office. A 
graduate of Boston University 
and Massachusetts General 
Hospital School of Nursing, Mrs. 
Calogiro was a nursing instructor 
before joining Jack Conway and 
Company. She is a past president 
of the Mass. General Hospital 
Nurses Alumnae Association. 

David M. Boyce of Weymouth 
will work out of the Whitman 
office. A native of Virginia, 



AFRAID 

TO TAKE 

THE 

PLUNGE? ^' ;a ^^ 




7 / J 
'/condominium 



IS 



NOT SURE 
lIVINfi/ZISFORYOU? 



WE ARE. AND HERE 
HOW WE WILL PROVE IT! 

ROYAL HiGHLAXDS 

GIVES A GUARANTEED BUY-BACK. 

Boy our condominium and if yoo or* not completely happy 
with if, wo will boy it back in 12 monthi for the original 
purchaso price, lei* $1200. usage allowance. 

GIVES A CONTINGENCY AGREEMENT. 

Buy now subject to the prior sale of your present home. 

GIVES GUARANTEED FINANCING. 

Royal Highlands oHers an indoor, heated Olympic size Pool, 
Saunas, Health Spa, Gome Room, Roof-Top Solarium, Fonc- 
tion Rooms and Sunbathing Deck with a panoramic view. 

located atop th» highest point in Quincy, close to 
Cxptestwa^ Shopping and Transportation. 

308 QUARRY ST., QUINCY 
OPEN 7 DAYS 10-6...THURS. & FRI. EVES. UNTIL 8 

Promoted exclusively By 

WILLIAMSON REALTY 

CONDOMINIUM SPECIAUSTS 

848-5828 479-6404 



Boyce received a BBA degree 
from the University of Georgia. 
Hobbies include sailing and 
model railroading. He was 
previously employed within 
Logan International Airport. 



Wire Inspector William II. 
Pitts reports that 117 permits 
were issued during the month of 
June for wiring costing an 
estimated $369,050. 

Fees collected during the 
month amounted to $1,522.25. 

Twelve defects were noted in 



175 inspections. There were 10 
re-inspections. 

The major wiring projects for 
the month were a new 164-unit 
apartment building at 91 Clay 
St., Wollaston, and a new 
20-unit apartment building at 80 
Newbury Ave., North Quincy. 



NOW IS THE TIME 



TO REPLACE THOSE ROTTED 
WOOD WINDOWS WITH 



Aluminum Replacement Windows 

"pZlTfrno'EyiEB '^"'-LY GUARANTEED 




REMOVES FOR 
EASY CLEANING 




LOW HEATING BILLS 




AHHH... 
PROBLEM -SOLVER 



YOU'RE A REAL 

CALL NOW FOR FREE ESTIMATES 



Maintenance-free NUPRIME Aluminum 
Windows are the ideal solution to all 
your window problems. In less time than 
it now takes to wash windows, NU- 
PRIME windows are installed for years 
of no-bother service. Our Full Guaran- 
tee is your assurance of quality. Inserts 
remove for convenient indoor cleaning. 

tJr^eann wmi/nA ^cmfi 



a/n 




343 NEWPORT AVENUE - WOLLASTON 

479-1014 



Member South Shore 
Chamber of Commerce 



Page 26 Quincy Sun Thursday, July 1 1 , 1974 
LEGAL NOTICES "" 



LEGAL NOTICES 



LEGAL NOTICES 



LEGAL NOTICES 



LEGAL NOTICES 



COMMONWEALTH OF 

MASSACHUSETTS 

Norfolk, ss. Probate Court 

No. 74P1466 

To all persons interested in the 
estate of PHILIP FRANKEL late of 
Quincy in said County, deceased. 
And to the Attorney General of said 
Commonwealth, if required. 

A petition has been presented to 
said Court for probate of a certain 
instrument purporting to be the last 
will of said deceased by HYMAN M. 
FRANKFL of Quincy in the County 
of Norfolk praying that he or some 
other suitable person, be appointed 
administrator with the will annexed 
of said estate. 

If you desire to object thereto you , 
or your attorney should file a written 
appearance in said Court at Dedham 
before ten o'clock in the forenoon on 
July 17, 1974, the return day of this 
citation. 

Witness, ROBERT M FORD, 
Esquire, First Judge of said Court, 
this June 10, 1974. 

PAUL C. GAY, 
Register. 
6/27 7/3-11/74 

COMMONWEALTH OF 

MASSACHUSETTS 

Norfolk, ss. Probate Court 

NO.74P1610 

To all persons interested in the 
estate of VONIE I. BARNES late of 
Quincy, in said County, deceased. 

A petition has been presented to 
said Court for probate of a certain 
instrument purporting to be the last 
will of said deceased by AGNES A. 
BRADLEY of North Miami, in the 
State of Florida, praying that she be 
appointed executrix thereof without 
giving a surety on her bond. 

If you desire to object thereto you 
or your attorney should file a written 
appearance in said Court at Dedham 
before ten o'clock in the forenoon on 
July 31, 1974, the return day of this 
citation. 

Witness, ROBERT M. FORD, 
Esquire, First Judge of said Court, 
this June 24, 1974. 

PAUL C. GAY, 
Register. 
7/3-11-18/74 

COMMONWEALTH OF 

MASSACHUSETTS 

Norfolk, ss. Probate Court 

No. 74P1407 

To all persons interested in the 
estate of HELEN M. HAWLEY late 
of Quincy in said County, deceased. 
And to the Attorney General of said 
Commonwealth, if required. 

A petition has been presented to 
said Court for probate of a certain 
instrument purporting to be the last 
will of said deceased by W. PAUL 
HAWLEY of Lafayette in the State 
of Louisiana praying that he be 
appointed executor thereof without 
giving a surety on his bond. 

If you desire to object thereto you 
or your attorney should file a written 
appearance in said Court at Dedham 
before ten o'clock in the forenoon on 
July 31, 1974, the return day of this 
citation. 

Witness, ROBERT M. FORD, 
Esquire, First Judge of said Court, 
this June 26, 1974. 

PAUL C. GAY, 
Register. 
7/11-18-25/74 

COMMONWEALTH OF 

MASSACHUSETTS 

Norfolk, ss. Probate Court 

No. 74P1594 

To ail persons interested in the 
estate of MARY E. KANE 
CARROLL late of Quincy in said 
County, deceased. And to the 
Attorney General of said 
Commonwealth, if required. 

A petition has been presented to 
said Court for probate of a certain 
instrument purporting to be the last 
will of said deceased by ANN 
CARROLL of Quincy in the County 
of Norfolk, praying that she be 
appointed executrix thereof. 

If you desire to object thereto you 
or your attorney should file a written 
appearance in said Court at Dedham 
before ten o'clock in the forenoon on 
July 24, 1974, the return day of this 
citation. 

Witness, ROBERT M. FORD, 
Esquire, First Judge of said Court, 
this June 19, 1974. 

PAUL C. GAY, 
Register. 
6/27 7/3-11/74 



CITY OF QUINCY 
IN COUNCIL 



April 1,1974 



ORDER NO. 153 
ORDERED: 

Be it ordained by the City Council of the City of Quincy, as follows: 

That the Revised Ordinances of the City of Quincy, 1960, as amended, be 
further amended as follows: 

In Chapter 22. Streets and sidewalks. Article 1. In General. Section 2. 

Depositing trash, rubbish, coal, etc., on streets. Add the following paragraph: 

"No person shall place or cause to be placed on the public sidewalk rubbish 

barrels or rubbish containers 15 hours before 7:00 A.M. on Uie date of 

collections." 

Passed to be Ordained 

June 17, 1974 

Attest: John M.Gillis 

Clerk of Council 

Approved June 25, 1974 

Walter J. Hannon 

Mayor 

A True Copy Attest; Thomas R. Burke, Assistant City Clerk 

7/11/74 



CITY OF QUINCY 
IN COUNCIL 



ORDER NO. 267 
ORDERED: 



June 3, 1974 



Be it ordained by the City Council of the City of Quincy as follows: 

That the Revised Ordinances of the City of Quincy, I960, as amended, be 
further amended, as follows: 

In Chapter 2. Administration. Article XXV. Salaries. Section 131. Titles of 
Positions and Salary Grades. Add the following words: 

TITLES GRADES SALARY 

EXECUTIVE SECRETARY TO 

CONSERVATION COMMISSION lA $5,094.00 

Effective Date April 1, 1974 

Passed to be Ordained 

June 17, 1974 

Attest: John M. Gillis 

Clerk of Council 

Approved June 25, 1974 

Walter J . Hannon 

Mayor 

A True Copy Attest: Thomas R. Burke, Assistant City Clerk 

7/11/74 



CITY 01 QUINCY 
IN COUNCIL 
ORDER NO. 245 June 17. 1974 

ORDERED: 

Be it ordained by the City Council of the City of Quincy as follows: 

That the Revised Ordinances of the City of Quincy, 1960, as amended be 
further amended, as follows: 

In Chapter 2. Administration. Article XXV. Salaries. Section 131. Titles of 
Positions and Salary Grades. Add the following words: 



TITLES 

FOOD SERVICE MANAGER - Hot Lunch 
ASSISTANT FOOD SERVICE MANAGER - Hot Lunch 



GRADES 

9-A 

2-A 



Passed to be Ordained 

June 17, 1974 

Attest: John M. Gillis 

Clerk of Council 

Approved June 25. 1974 

Walter J. Hannon 

- Mayor 

A True Copy Attest: Thomas R. Burke, Assistant City Clerk 

7/11/74 



CITY OF QUINCY 
IN COUNCIL 



ORDERED: 



June 28, 1974 



Be it ordained by the City Council of Quincy, as follows: 

That the Revised Ordinances of the City of Quincy, 1960, as amended, be 
further amended as follows: 

In Chapter 3. Animals. Section 7. Dogs to be leashed and restrained by owner 
and/or keeper. 

In said Section, delete the words twenty [ $20.00] dollars where said words 
appear and insert in place thereof the words "twenty-five | $25.00 1 dollars." 

A true copy Attest: 

John M. Gillis 

Clerk of Council 



7/11/74 



ORDFRED: 



CITY OF QUINCY 
IN COUNCIL 



June 28, 1974 



Be it ordained by the City Council of the City of Quincy as follows: 

That the Revised Ordinances of the City of Quincy, 1960, as amended, be 
further amended as follows: 

In Chapter 2. Administration. Article XXV. Salaries. Section 131. General 
Classification of Positions and Wage Schedules. Add the following: 



Position 

Evening Superintendent for Administration- 
Quincy City Hospital 



Cirade 
14B 



A true copy Attest: 

John M. Gillis 

Clerk of Council 



CITY OF QUINCY 
IN COUNCIL 



ORDER NO. 246 
ORDERED: 



June 3, 1974 



Be it ordained by the City Council of the City of Quincy as follows: 

That the Revised Ordinances of the City of Quincy, 1960, as amended, be 
further amended as follows: 

In Chapter 2. Administration. Article XXV. Salaries. Section 131. General 
Classification of Positions and Grades. Strike out the following: 

Engineer's Plan 

Step 1 Step 2 Step 3 Step 4 Step 5 Step 6 Step 7 



lEP 


130.35 


135.10 


139.85 


144.60 


149.35 


154.10 


158.85 


2EP 


153.20 


159.05 


164.90 


170.75 


176.60 


182.45 


188.30 


3EP 


185.20 


192.80 


200.40 


208.00 


215.60 


223.20 


230.80 


4EP 


209.50 


218.80 


228.10 


237.40 


246.70 


256.00 


265.30 



and in place thereof insert the following: 

Engineer's Plan 

Step 1 Step 2 Step 3 Step 4 Step 5 Step 6 Step 7 

lEP 130.35 135.10 139.85 144.60 149.35 154.10 158.85 

2EP 153.20 159.05 164.90 170.75 176.60 182.45 188.30 

3EP 197.15 205.45 213.75 222.05 230.35 238.65 246.95 

4EP 224.05 233.80 243.55 253.30 263.05 272.80 282,55 

this order to take effect as of July 1 , 1 973. 

Passed to be Ordained 

June 17, 1974 

Attest: John M. Gillis 

Clerk of Council 

Approved June 25, 1974 

Walter J. Hannon 

Mayor 

A True Copy Attest: Thomas R. Burke, Assistant City Clerk 

7/11/74 



COMMONWEALTH OF 

MASSACHUSETTS 

Norfolk, ss. Probate Court 

No. 74D0882 

To WILLIAM D. O'LEARY of 
Parts Unknown. 

A libel has been presented to said 
Court by your wife ANN S. 
O'LEARY praying that a divorce 
from the bond of matrimony 
between herself and you be decreed 
for the cause of desertion and 
praying for alimony and for custody 
and allowance for minor children. 

If you desire to object thereto, 
you or your attorney should file a 
written appearance in said Court at 
Dedham within twenty-one days 
from Sept, 25, 1974, the return day 
of this citation. 

Witness, ROBERT M. FORD, 
Esquire, First Judge of said Court, 
June 26, 1974. 

PAUL C. GAY, 
Register. 
7/3-11-18/74 

SHERIFF'S SALE 
Norfolk, ss, Quincy, August 6, 1973 

Seized and taken on execution and 
will sell at Public Auction on 
Tuesday, August 20, 1974 at 9:30 
o'clock in the forenoon at the 
Deputy Sheriffs Office, 875 Southern 
Artery, Quincy, Norfolk County, all 
the right, title and interest which 
John M. Williams of Weymouth, had 
[not exempt by law from attachment 
or levy on execution] on the 6th day 
of August 1973 at 9 o'clock in the 
forenoon being the day and time the 
same was seized on execution in and 
to the following described real estate, 
to wit: 

A certain parcel of land with the 
buildings thereon in Weymouth, 
Norfolk County bounded and 
described as follows: 

Westerly by Lake Shore Drive, 
sixty-five and seventy-four 
hundredths [65.74] feet; 

Northerly by a passageway shown 
on said plan, one hundred [100] 
feet; 

Easterly by the shore line of 
Whitman's Pond, thirty-seven [37] 
feet; 

Southerly by lot 38 on .said plan, 
one hundred three ( 103 ) feet. 

Containing, according to said plan, 
five thousand two hundred (5,2001 
square feet of land. 
Terms: Cash Robert F. Brownell, 
Deputy Sheriff. 
6/27 7/3-11/74 



LOST PASSBOOK 



7/11/74 






The following Passbook No. 118617 
has been lost, destroyed or stolen and 
application for payment has been 
made in accordance with Section 20, 
Chapter 167, General Laws. The 
finder will please return to the 
Granite Coop Bank, 121 Granite St., 
Quincy. 
7/11-18/74 



COMMONWEALTH OF 

MASSACHUSETTS 

Norfolk, ss. Probate Court 

NO.74D09I0 

To ROBERT J. EASTWOOD of 
2811 Fairpark Blvd, Little Rock, 
Arkansa. 

A libel has been presented to said 
Court by your wife JEANNETTE S. 
EASTWOOD praying that a divorce 
from the bond of matrimony 
between herself and you be decreed 
for the cause of cruel and abusive 
treatment. 

If you desire to object thereto, 
you or your attorney should file a 
written appearance in said Court at 
Dedham within twenty-one days 
from Aug. 7, 1974, the return day of 
this citation. 

Witness, ROBERT M. FORD, 
Esquire, First Judge of said Court, 
this June 28, 1974. 

PAUL C. GAY, 
Register. 
7/3-11-18/74 



SHERIFF'S SALE 
Norfolk, ss. Quincy, June 18, 1973 

Seized and taken on execution and 
will sell at Public Auction on 
Tuesday. August 20, 1974 at 10 
o'clock in the forenoon at the 
Deputy Sheriffs Office, 875 Southern 
Artery, Quincy, Norfolk County, all 
the right, title and interest which 
Agnes E. Smart of Milton had (not 
exempt by law from attachment or 
levy on execution] on the 18th day 
of June 1973 at 9 o'clock in the 
forenoon being the day and time the 
same was seized on execution in and 
to the following described real estate 
to wit: of that certain parcel of land 
situate in MILTON in the County of 
Norfolk and said Commonwealth, 
bounded and described as follows: 

Northwesterly by Lincoln Street, 
fifty [50] feet; 

Northeasteriy by lot numbered 12, 
shown on the plan hereinafter 
referred to, two hundred one and 
31/100 1201,31) feet; 

Southeasterly by lots numbered 22 
and 21, shown on said plan, fifty and 
31/100 150.31] feet; and 

Southwesterly by lot numbered 
14, shown on said plan, two hundred 
six and 93/100 1206.93] feet. 
Terms: Cash Robert E. Brownell, 
Deputy Sheriff 
6/27 7/3-11/74 



LOST PASSBOOK 

The following Passbook No. 9292-4 
has been lost, destroyed or stolen and 
application for payment has been 
made in accordance with Section 20, 
Chapter 167, General LSws. The 
finder will please return to the 
Granite Coop Bank, 120 Granite 
Street, Quincy. 
7/3-11/74 



f,^ >».%.•»« ^^^ .»>•-* %-#*^-^ ».• ♦ 



f *^ • •* 






Thursday, July 1 1 , 1974 Quincy Sun Page 27 



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LFGAL NOTICES 



SHFRIF! 'S SALE 
Norfolk, ss. Quincy, March 4, 1974 

Seized and taken on execution and 
will sell at Public Auction on 
Wednesday, Aug. 21, 1974 at 9:15 in 
the forenoon at the Deputy Sheriffs 
Office, 875 Southern Artery, Quincy, 
Norfolk County, all the right, title 
and interest with Lewis M. Baker of 
Brain tree had [not exempt by law 
from attachment or levy on 
execution] on the 3rd day of August 
1969 at 9 o'clock in the forenoon 
being the day and time the same was 
attached on Mesne Process in and to 
the following described real estate, to 
wit: a certain parcel of land with all 
the buildings thereon in Braintree, 
Norfolk County bounded and 
described as follows: 

Southwesterly by Armstrong 
Circle, fifty and thirty-five 
hundredths (50.35 1 feet; 

Northwesterly by lot 10 on said 
plan, one hundred and sixty 
hundredths (100.60) feet; 

Northeasterly by land now or 
formerly of John Leo and Thomas 
Leo, eighty and thirty-five 
hundredths [80.35] feet; 

Southeasterly by a future road on 
said plan, seventy and sixty 
hundredths (70.60) feet; and 

Southerly by a curved line forming 
the junction of said future road and 
Armstrong Circle, forty-seven and 
twelve hundredths (47.12) feet; 

Containing according to said plan, 
seven thousand eight hundred ninety 
( 7,890 ( square feet of land. 
Terms: Cash Donald L. White, 

Deputy Sheriff 
6/27 7/3-11/74 

COMMONWEALTH OF 
MASSACHUSETTS 

Norfolk, ss. Probate Court 

No. 74P1035 

To all persons interested in the 
estate of HELEN M. SMITH late of 
Quincy in said County, deceased, 
testate. And to the Attorney General 
of said Commonwealth, if required. 

A petition has been presented to 
said Court for license to sell at 
private sale certain real estate of said 
deceased which is situated in said 
Quincy, in accordance with the offer 
set out in said petition. 

If you desire to object thereto you 
or your attorney should file a written 
appearance in said Court at Dedham 
before ten o'clock in the forenoon on 
July 31, 1974, the return day of this 
citation. 

Witness, ROBERT M. FORD, 
Esquire, First Judge of said Court, 
this June 26, 1974. 

PAUL C. GAY, 
Register. 
7/3-1 M8/74 

COMMONWEALTH OF 

MASSACHUSETTS 

Norfolk, ss. Probate Court 

No. 199,301 

To all persons interested in the 
estate of MARION A. HASKINS, late 
of Quincy in said County, deceased. 
And to the Attorney General of said 
Commonwealth, if required. 

A petition has been presented to 
said Court for probate of a certain 
instrument purporting to be the last 
will of said deceased by SOUTH 
SHORE NATIONAL BANK of 
Quincy in the County of Norfolk 
praying that it be appointed executor 
thereof without giving a surety on its 
bond. 

If you desire to object thereto you 
or your attorney should file a written 
appearance in said Court at Dedham 
before ten o'clock in the forenoon on 
July 17, 1974, the return day of this 
citation. 

Witness, ROBERT M. FORD, 
Esquire, First Judge of said Court, 
this June 14, 1974. 

PAUL C. GAY, 
Register. 
6/27 7/3-11/74 



Save Gas and Money 
shop locally. 



fy ... j 



HELP WANTED 



HELP WANTED 



HOCKEY 

Face of Circle Sports Inc. will be holding 
more interviews to select go-getters for our 
hockey school and broadcasts. In person 
interview only. Call Mr. Yeager for 
appointment. 396-1350. 

7/11 



COUNSELLING 



COUNSELLING 



Thtre is no uninvolved person when sex it a problem! 



SEXUAL HEALTH CENTER 



TeIephone 536-04t"4 



RITA HASS, Ph.O. 

Social Psycholofiist 



401 COMMONWEALTH AVENL'E 
BOSTO.N, .MASSACHUSETTS 02.'1S 



HELP WANTED 



MOTHER'S HELPER 

MOTHER'S HELPER at the 
beach. Own room, Good home. 
Salary arranged. Call 925-1379. 

7/11. 



LEGAL NOTICES 



COMMONWEALTH OF 

MASSACHUSETTS 

Norfolk, ss. Probate Court 

N0.74P1584 

To all persons interested in the 
estate of RAYMOND W. JOHNSON 
late of Quincy in said County, 
deceased. An to the Attorney 
General of said Commonwealth, if 
required. 

A petition has been presented to 
said Court for probate of a certain 
instrument purporting to be the last 
will of said deceased by ROBERT 1. 
JOHNSON of Quincy in the County 
of Norfolk praying that he be 
appointed executor thereof without 
giving a surety on his bond. 

If you desire to object thereto you 
or your attorney should file a written 
appearance in said Court at Dedham 
before ten o'clock in the forenoon on 
July 24, 1974, the return day of this 
citation. 

Witness, ROBERT M. FORD, 
Esquire, First Judge of said Court, 
this June 17, 1974. 

PAUL C. GAY, 
Register. 
6/27 7/3-1 1/74 



INSTRUCTION 



SUMMER 
GUITAR LESSONS 

At your home. Special hail price 
rates tor beginners. Children 8-16, 
housewives. Ri'fercncc and 
information. 479-5839 

7/11 



FOR SALE 

Drafting equipment and books, 
electrical equipment and 
bookcase. Flourescent lights and 
Safari Lamp. Fully equipped Bird 
Cage, radios, sunburst clock, 
exercise bar. 773-2635. 7/11 



LEGAL NOTICES 

NOTICE OF SHAREHOLDERS 
SPECIAL MEETING 

A special meeting of the 
Shareholders of the Shipbuilders 
Cooperative Bank will be held on 
Monday, July 22, 1974, at 3:45 p.m., 
at the bank's office, I Granite Street, 
Quincy, Massachusetts, for the 
purpose of acting on an amendment 
to Article I of the by-laws concerning 
the name of the bank. If the 
amendment is approved by the 
Shareholders at the meeting and 
becomes effective, the name of the 
bank will be changed from 
Shipbuilders Cooperative Bank to 
Presidential Cooperative Bank; and 
further, to act on any other business 
requiring the attention of the 
Shareh olden. 

Francix X. McCauley 
Shareholders' Clerk 
7/11/74 



SERVICES OFFERED 



SERVICESOFFERED 




mm 



\ART FLOOR CO., Inc. 

cr^te the EMood with . . . 

LINOLEUM 

& TILE 

KENTILE . AMTICO . ARMSTRONG 

CONGOLEUM 

SOLD and INSTALLED 

HARDWOOD FLOORS, LAID & REFINISHED by our SPECIALISTS. 
Complete Line of Ceramic Tile • Carpeting 

diaL .. 328-6970 

115 Sagamore St., NORTH QUINCY 



LICENSED 
ELECTRICIAN 

Douglas W. Mason Jr. No job too 
small. Free Estimates. Call 
328-5743 anytime. 

7/25 

KEYS MADE 

Locksmith on Duty 

GRANITE CITY 

HARDWARE 

161 7. Hancock St., Quincy 



479-5454 



T.F 



GENERAL CONTRACTORS 
MORAN & SONS 

Roofs, Porches, Gutters and 
Painting. All work guaranteed. 
I HA approved. Bonded & 
Insured. Free estim^ites. 

265-1426. or 471-1725.. 

7/25 



FOR SALE 



FINE FURNISHINGS 

Household goods . reasonably 
priced. Living room set, dining, 
room table, and chairs, color 
console TV, sewing machine, rugs, 
2 girls bikes, refrigerator and 
many miscellaneous articles. 
Saturday, July 13, 10:00 - 5 P.M., 
41 Academy St., Braintree, near 
Thayer Academy. 

" - .• 7/11 

MATTRESSES 

MATTRESSES - Immediate 
Delivery. Can you u.se 
exceptionally good buys on king, 
quccii, full or twin mattresses, 
beds, trundles, bunks at discount. 
lUand names; Scaly, . Eclipse, 
Slumberland, Englander, etc. 
Bedding has been our only 
business for over 20 years. Open 
eves.. Siesta Sleep Shops, 221 
Parkingway, Quincy, Corner of 
School Street. 

■.'TvP. : 
ALBUMS 

For sale, entire Dylan collection, 
Allman,' Grateful Deady Joni 
Mitchell. Many more. Call Liz, 

843-4197. 
. , " 7/11 



Lawns cut and raked. Yards 
and cellars cleaned. Very 
inexpensive. Call Kevin 
364-9456 

7/11 

CARPENTRY 

Licensed builder, 26 years 
experience. Repairs, remodeling & 
additions. No job too small. Free 
estimates. Charles J. Ross, 
479-3755. j.F. 

HALL FOR RENT 

North Quincy K. of C. Building, 5 
Hollis Ave. lor information 
Mease call 

328-5552- 328-0087 
328-9822 t.f. 

HALLS FOR HIRE 

Weddings - showers - meetings - 
banquets. Elks Home, 1220 
Hancock St., Quincy, 



472-2223. 



t.f. 



CHILD CARE 

Rent-A-Parent. Young married 
South Shore couples will care for 
your home and children while 
you enjoy your vacation. 
Interviews and References 
available. 

UNIVERSITY 
HOME SERVICES 
961-1616 RANDOLPH 
449-3590 NEEDHAM 
t.f. 

ARCHIE'S LAWN 
MOWER SERVICE 

Guarantee Quality Work. Honest 
Prices. No job too small. Free 
Estimates. 92 South Central 
Avenue, Wollaston. 472-8675. 
- 8/29 

INSURANCE 

HOME OWNERS RATES ARE 
LOWER: If you have a basic 
Homeowner's policy for $20,000 
and arc paying more than $62.00 
a year, call 282-4412 at once. 
Rutstein Insurance Agency. T.F. 



Index for 
Classified 

A .....Services 

B For Sale 

C Autos 

D.... Boats 

E For Rent 

F .....Help Wanted 

G ..Pets, Livestock 

H Lost and Found 

r...........Real Estate for Sale 

J.... Real Estate Wanted 

K Miscellaneous 

L ..Work Wanted 

M... Antiques 

N Coins and Stamps 

0. Rest Homes 

P... Instruction 






MAIL TO: QUINCY SUN 1601 Hancock St., Quincy 02169 
WANT ADS PAYABLE IN ADVANCE.cash must accompany order 
Enclosed '«■ ^"■- the following ad to "^** times 



COPY: 



Contnct rate: 



$2.50 for one week, up to 20 word, 5^ each additional word. 
$2.25 per week, up to 20 words for three or more insertions of 

the same ad. 
10 Consecutive issues $2.00 per week 
No refund will foe made at this contract rate in the event of 

cancellation. 

Deadline: Friday 5 P.M. for the following weeks publication. 
Please*include your phone number in ad. 



"^pn 



Page 28 Quincy Sun Thursday, July 1 1 , 1974 



J 






the 'co^yjA^ co(/ACT^^' Classified Column 



The Best Values To Date on the South Shore 



\ 



QUINCY 



Near Golf Club 




Dutch Colonial located in residential area of 
WoUaston, near Furnace Brook Golf Club. 3 
bedrooms, 17' modem kitchen featuring 
double oven, wall to wall on first floor. 
Paneled family room in basement, formal 
living room with fireplace, dining room. 
Chain link fence. Perfect for children. 
$35,900. Call our Quincy Office 773-1800. 



QUINCY 



Bus Will Stop At Your Door 




2 family apartment home. 5Vi rooms each. 2 
bedrooms, 13' x 18" kitchen, living room, 
dining room and porch. Lots of storage. 1 
car garage. Bus to MBTA goes right by. Walk 
to schools. Nice investment at $47,500. Call 
our Quincy Office 773-1800. 



QUINCY 



Almost Ready For Owner 




Brand new Ranch style home is nearing 
completion for new owner. Home features 3 
large bedrooms and a unique family room. 
Convenient location for entire family. 
Offered for $47,500. Call our Quincy Office 
773-1800. 



QUINCY 



2 Family - Near Beach 

• 

This 2 family Colonial is located in a lovely 
section of town. One apartment has 6 
rooms, the other 5. Both offer Iron I 
porches, hardwood floors, separate 
basements. Close to WoUaston Beach. 
Perfect area for children as back yard is 
enclosed. A good buy at $45,000. 



Investment - 

Business 
Opportunities 

• Neighborhood variety store 
with real estate $29,900. 

• Prime restaurant/retail 
location in Quincy Square. 
6,400 sq.ft. For sale or lease. 

• Apartment house land zoned 
for 34 units. 

• 6 contractor's offices, $50 
each per month. 

Quincy Commercial 

Division 

773-1800 



QUINCY 



Price Reduced! 




Owners purchased new home and must sell 
this 2 story Frame home immediately. 
Convenient WoUaston location, near golf 
course and baseball field. 4 bedrooms, I'/j 
baths, 24' living room, dining room, kitchen 
with eating area. Garage, beautiful yard, full 
basement, hardwood floors. Price reduced 
to $36,900. 



MILTON 



Stately Brick Colonial 




A truly elegant 8 room Colonial. Located in 
the beautiful Parkway area, near Pierce 
School. Home features 3 bedrooms, I'A 
baths, 2 car garage. Fireplaced living room, 
formal dinmg room, country kitchen. 
Unfinished third floor has many possible 
uses. Older home easily restored to former 
elegance. Cannot be duplicated at $42,500. 
Call our Quincy Office 773-1800. 



WEYMOUTH 



In-ground Pool 

I'ull Shed Dormer Cape with 7 good sized 
rooms. 3 queen size bedrooms, \Vi baths, 
family room or 4th bedroom, living room, 
hostess dining room. Sliders off large 
kitchen to deck, overlooking 16" x 32' 
in-ground pool, first floor laundry area. 
Tremendous closet space. All this for only 
$37,500. Call our Quincv Office at 
773-1800. 



WEYMOUTH 



New Listing, Just $28,500 




Child safe home located on dead end street. 
7 lovely rooms with 4 good sized bedrooms. 
Pine cabinets in large kitchen with family 
eating area. Central location. A truly good 
buy at $28,500. For further details call our 
Quincy Office at 773-1800. 



WEYMOUTH 



Near Beach 



BRAINTREE 



Close to Plaza and X-way 




Great family home and area. Walk to public 
transportation. Beach at end of street. 5 
room home has 2 good size bedrooms. 27' 
screened porch is perfect for summer 
entertaining. Large living and dining rooms. 
Also featur(;s a mud room and pantry. 
Cannot be passed up at $26,900. Call our 
Quincy Office at 773-1800. 



WEYMOUTH 



Central Air Conditioning 




7 room Ranch offers many expensive 

extras. ..at a very reasonable price. 2 
bedrooms, IVi baths, jalousied window 
porch with knotty pine walls can be used 
year round. Huge 24 \ 26 family room, 
living room with fireplace, formal dining 
room, wall to wall throughout. Walk in 
closet, tool shed. All for only $36,500. Call 
our Quincy Office 773-1800. 



WEYMOUTH 



Fruit Trees Galore 




Well maintained 6 room Cape situated 
among beautiful fruit trees and grape arbors. 
3 queen size bedrooms, 18" kitchen has new 
cabinets. Wall to wall in living room and 
hostess dining room. New wiring and roof. 
Screen porch for summer enjoyment. I'ully 
fenced in yard. Garage. Ivxccllent value at 
$31,900. Call our Qumcy Office 773-1800. 



NEEDED IMMKDIMFL 



r\ 



Our Quincy Office needs licensed real estate 
sales people to help staff uur new. active 
office in the Chiiinber of Commerce 
Buildiiii;. 

Applicants should be willing to work a full 
40 hour week, willing to learn and sincere in 
wanting to help people. 

Jack Conway & Co. Realtors, New 
Fngland's largest residential real estate firm 
offers a continuous education program plus 
the resources of 15 years experience and 14 
offices 

Applicants should call Rita Sweeney, 
anager of the Quincy Office 773-1 800. 



This 6 room Ganison Colonial is in an area 
of superb homes. Centrally located. 3 twin 
size bedrooms, IVi baths, fireplaced living 
room, formal dining room, modern kitchen, 
attached garage. Big backyard. Wall to wall 
in much of home. $43,900. Call our Quincy 
Office 773-1800. 



MILTON 



New Home In Prestige Area 




Brand new 7 room Side to Side Split offers 
the best in executive hving. 3 queen size 
bedrooms, 2Vi baths, family room, 
fireplaced 24' living room, formal dining 
room. Sliding glass doors to deck, garage. 
Near Fast Milton Square and Fxpressway. A 
beautiful home for $55,900. Call our 
Quincy Office 773-1800. 



MILTON 



15 Minutes To Boston 





Immaculate 8 room Garrison Colonial set 
high on a hill in excellent area. 4 queen size 
bedrooms, family room, 21' living room, 
formal dining room. Partial brick front, 
attached garage, enclosed porch, fenced in 
yard. Beautiful home for $43,900. Call our 
Quincy Office 773-1800. 



WEYMOUTH 



Investment Potential - Duplex 

Everything is newly renovated in this 
Duplex. New shingles, walls, heating system, 
plumbing, wiring, kitchens and baths! Both 
have 5 rooms, 2 bedrooms, living room, 
hostess dining room, kitchen, plus full attic 
for storage. Move in condition. Fantastic 
investment property. $42,900. Call our 
Qumcy Office 773-1800. 



WEYMOUTH 



Duptex - $28,800 

This Duplex offers great possibilities. Both 
have 5 rooms. 2 bedrooms, 2 baths, living 
room, kitchen and den. Bureau's are built-in 
each bedroom. Outside needs some work. 
Live in one, rent the other. ..or rent both. 
Great buy for an income property. $28,800. 
Call our Qui ncy Office 773-1800. 

/^ INVESTMENT "\ 
BUILDING 

New brick professional office 
building. Near expressway. 
Take advantage of first user's 
depreciation. Financing 
arranged. $125,000 cash 
required. Call Dick Green in 
our Quincy Commercial 
.Division, 773-1800. 



/ 



Quincy, Mass. 0216q 



r 




FIFTEEN OF THE 29 contestants for Miss Quincy Bay Race Week of 1974 pose 
atop seawall in preparation for the Friday, 9:30 p.m. pageant in down town 
Quincy. From the left are Judith Owens, 21, Laura DiCarlo, 18, Joanne Cirine, 
16. Mary Anderson, 16, Janet McConarty, 16, Robin Burns, 16, Rossana 



DiCarto, 18, Barbara Ann Hoder, 19, Kristie Henrikten, 16, Kim Affsa, 18. 
Donna Ternullo, 18, Helen Milani. 19, Elizabeth Jenkins, 17, Maria Peterson, 17, 
and Cynthia Maze, 18. see Stories, Pages 14 and 15 

[Quincy Sun Photo by Laban Whittaker] 




Vol. 6 No. 44 
Thursday, July 18, 1974 



2uUe^'4 Ottm TCeeiC^ ftem^a/Wt 



3 Days Of Fun, Buys 

Downtown All Set 
For Sidewalk Bazaar 

By MARY ANN DUGGAN 

It's that time again - time for that three-day extravaganza known as Quincy's Sidewalk 
Bazaar. 

This year marks the city's fifth festival, with Thursday as opening day. In keeping with 
tradition, the fun-filled days will culminate with the crowning of a new Miss Quincy Bay 
Race Week Friday evening. 



Most downtown stores will 
participate in the Quincy Center 
Business and Professional 
Association sponsored bazaar, 
displaying merchandise on 
bargain-wild tables, shelves and 
booths. Store owners will wear 
brimmed and banded straw hats 



and kids wOl sport Indian 
headbands, adding to the gaiety 
of the three-day carnival. 

Hancock St. will become a 
pedestrian mall for the three-day 
festive period. The street will be 
blocked off from 10 a.m. to 10 
p.m. Thursday, Friday and 



Saturday from Granite St. to 
School St. 

Police Lt. Jack Flaherty noted 
that traffic could by-pass 
Hancock St. by using Chestnut 
St. on the easterly side and the 
Ross Parking Way on the 
[Cont'd on Page 16] 



Calendar Of Events 



Quincy's fifth annual 
Sidewalk Bazaar offers three 
days of fun and 
entertainment starting 
Thursday. Main events and 
time schedule follows: 

THURSDAY 



exhibition, 
Colman's, 



• Karate 
platform near 
2-2:30 p.m. 

• Magician act - Johnny 
Sisson - platform near 
Colman's, 2:45, 3:15, 3:45 
p.m. 

• Children's Zoo, platform 
near South Shore National 
Bank, 2 p.m. and 3:15 p.m. 

• Police Ambulance, 
platform near South Shore 
National Bank, 2:45 p.m. 

• Fire Engine Rides, early 
evening. 

• Young World Performers, 
Cottage Ave., 7 p.m. and 8 
p.m. 

• Banjo Band, South Shore 
National Bank, 6 p.m.; 
Grossman's at 7:30 p.m.; and 
platform near Colman's at 
8:30 p.m. 

• Renegades, St. John's to 
Colman's at 6:30 p.m.; South 
Shore National at 7:30 p.m.; 
Grossman's at 8:30 p.m. 



FRIDAY 

• Karate exhibition, 
platform near South Shore 
National Bank, 2 p.m. 

• Magician act - Johnny 
Sisson, platform near South 
Shore National Bank, 2:45, 
3:15 and 3:45 p.m. 

• Children's Zoo, platform 
near Colman's, 2 p.m. and 
3:15 p.m. 

• Clydesdales, assemble in 
front of City HaU at 10:30 
a.m. Tour area until 3:30 
p.m. 

• Fire engine rides, early 
evening. 

• Milton Band, St. John's 
to South Shore National 
Bank at 7 p.m., platform near 
Colman's at 8 p.m. 

• Miss Quincy Bay Race 
Week Beauty Pageant, 
Hancock Bank, 9:30 p.m. 

• Young World Performers, 
Cottage Ave., 7 p.m. and 8 
p.m. 

• Police attack dog 
demonstration. South Shore 
National Bank, 8 p.m. 

SATURDAY 

• Fire engine 
demonstration, Colman's 

[Cont'd oii Page 16] 




AND THIRTEEN MORE contestants are, from the left, Joanne Gallagher, 17, 
Beverly Lindholm, 19, Marianne Hackett, 19, Janice Lamparelli, 18, Debbi King, 
19, Pamela Mills, 17, Shiu-on Riddell, 17, Jean Casanova, 18, Kristi Jaoobson, 16, 



Lisa Furlani, 17, Linda Champagne, 24, Laura Sorgi, 17, and Christine Cardinale, 
19. Missing from photo is Lauri Meyers, 20. 

[Quincy Sun Photo by Laban Whittaker] 



I 

J 



Page 2 Quincy Sun Thursday, July 18, 1974 




Published weekly on Thursday by 

The Quincy Sun Publishing Company 

1601 Hancock St., Quincy, Massachusetts 02169 

Publisher and Editor 

Henry W. Bosworth, Jr. 

Advertising Director 

John B. Powers 

10^ Per Copy - $4,00 Per Year -Out of State $5.00 Per Year 

Telephone: 471-3100 471-3101 471-3102 

Second-Class Postage Paid at Boston, Mass. 

MEMBER NEW ENGLAND PRESS ASSOCIATION 

The Quincy Sun assume* no financial rcsr""»il'''l'ly *^"/ 
tvpograpiiical errors in advertisements but will reprint that part ot 
an advertisement in which the typcigraphical error occurs. 



Magician To Perform 



Johnny Sisson of Wollaston, 
professional magician for 26 
years, will entertain during 
Quincy's fifth annual Sidewalk 
Bazaar. 

A native of Maine, Sisson got 
his start at Fuller Studio 
Marionette Company. 

He will perform three 



15-niinute acts this atternoon 
[Thursday] on the platform 
near Colman's from 2:45 to 3; 
3:15 to 3:30; 3:45 to 4 p.m. 

On Friday the time schedule 
will be identical but the location 
will change to the platform near 
South Shore National Bank. 




SIDEWALK SALE 



on the Sidewalk 
50 to 75% OFF 



In the Store 
10 to 50% OFF 



* SUITS 

* SPORTCOATS- 

* SLACKS 



* FORMAL WEAR 

* DRESS SHIRTS 

* KNIT SHIRTS 

* SPORT SHIRTS 



* SWIMWEAR 

* BERMUDAS 

* JACKETS 



STORE HOURS 

Man. t* Friday 

«A.M.)a9F.M. 

Sat. 

«A.M.IoS;30P.M. 




Since 7979 



• Donaher'i Charge 

• C.A.P. 

• BANKAMERICARD 

• MASTER CHARGE • 

Clofh/ng for Men, Quincy 

EASY PARKiSCj, . ■ tnlar Vio 1544 Honcock S(. or J. Hon'.o';k Pork'rg Aiea 

Thurs., Fri.,Sat., July 18, 19, 20 




SIDEWALK BAZAAR DAYS -■ Mayor Walter J. Hannon proclaims Thursday, Friday and Saturday 
Quincy Sidewalk Bazaar Days. Looking on in appropriate skimmers are, from the left Henry Bosworth 
of The Quincy Sun, chairman of the Miss Quincy Bay Race Week Beauty Pageant, Mark Bertman of 
Rogers Jewelry, president of the sponsoring Quincy Center Business arid Professional Association; 
QCBPA Executive Director John Murray, George White of The Patriot Ledger, bazaar coordinator and 
Phil Chase of Cumming's, QCBPA promotions chairman. 

[Quincy Sun Photo by Laban WhittakerJ 

Hannon Proclaims July 18-19-20 
Sidewalk Bazaar Days In Quincy 



Mayor Walter J. Hannon has 
proclaimed today [Thursday], 
Friday and Saturday, "Sidewalk 
Bazaar Days" in Quincy and 
urged residents and public 
organizations to participate in 
and support the promotion. 

Following is the text of the 
proclamation: 

WHEREAS, The American 
standard of living is recognized 



as the highest in the world and is 
due, in great part, to the 
abundance and high quality of 
the products of our competitive 
enterprise system and their 
forthright identification by 
trademarks submitted for the 
free choice of the consuming 
public, and 

WHEREAS, American 
tradition of independent 
enterprise is as old as our society 



discount toy supermarkets 



sidewalk sale! 



itself and from humble 
beginnings small business has 
grown into one of the principal 
economic forces in this, the 
world's greatest industrial 
nation, and 

WHEREAS, If downtown 
Quincy retailers are to realize 
their full potential in the years 
ahead, they need and deserve 
wholehearted support from the 
citizens in the business 
community as a whole as well as 
the strong encouragement it 
already receives from national 
organizations and the local 
government, and 

WHEREAS. Quincy Square 
retailers are joining this week 
with various civic and business 
groups in providing the citizens 
of Quincy and The South Shore 
unsurpassed retailing 
opportunities. 

NOW, THEREFORE, 1, 
Walter J. Hannon. Mayor of the 
Quincy. do hereby 
July 18, 19. and 20, 



City of 
proclaim 
1974, as 



3 DAYS 
ONLY! 



Thursday, Friday 
and Saturday 



Hundreds of top toys to choose from. We've piled them 
high on our Bargain Tables. Be sure to visit Child World 
whera you don't need ready cash. We accept Bank- 
Americard or Mastercharge. Come early 
for the best selection. 



•55i^F» 



SIDEWALK BAZAAR DAYS 

and encourage all citizens and 
public organizations to join with 
me during this week in paying 
tribute to the accomplishments 
of small business in helping it 
toward continued strength and 
success. 

Walter J. Hannon, Mayor 

Over 5,000 
Headbands 

The Quincy Center Business 
and Professional Association is 
giving away over 5,000 colorful 
Indian headbands on Thursday, 
Friday and Saturday during the 
Sidewalk Bazaar. 

Youngsters may pick up their 
headband at the QCBPA booth 
at Old Hancock Bank located on 
the corner of Cottage Ave., and 
Hancock St. 



^■ ^r^-pT 



JbU 



TWIN ENTRANCES 
HANCOCK ST. & PARKINGWAY 

QUINCY 



THANKS 

for Your 

PATRONAGE 



i^^^'^^^^^^^ 



Pilgrim 
Luncheonette 

1472 Hancock Street 

Quincy 



Thursday, July 18, 1974 Quincy Sun Page 3 



PRIMUS 

STREAMLINER 

2 BURNER 

PROPANE STOVE 

Converts to handy 
carrying case - hand- 
some green and gold 
colors 
"indcpandtnt Controls 
IdMl lor Camp f 
or Homo 2 

SAVE '8*' 



NEMROD 

TANK 

BACK PACK 

REGULATOR 

• 72 Foot Cubic Tank 

• Sturdy Plastic 
Back Pack with 
Nylon Straps 

• Comfortablo Mouth 
Piocs and Hoaos 



i 



SAVE 

$7Q "«9 



:^1 

lOO 



$199. 



SUMMiR lUN 

PVC 2-MAN 6-FOOT 
BOAT - Red - White - Blue, 

98 



3 Compartments 
Reg. 19.98 



Badminton Sets $1.98 
Frisbee Horseshoes 3.99 

Peter Max 
NOVELTY DESIGN 

Heavy Duty f^CAA 
withRopo •■^VW 
and Rope Locks 



SPOT-BILT-HYOE 

U.S. PRO KEDS 
JOGGERS or 
TENNIS 
SHOES $7'' 

WAS $19.95 f 



56 QUART COOLER 

Rugged Polyethylene plastic construction 
has scuff resistant pebble grain finish. Easy 
Grip handles. Choice of colors. 



Regular $21.88 



Coleman f, 



ALSO 
Products and Replacement Parts 



3 DAYS ONLY 

THURS.-FRI.- SAT. JULY 

18-19-20 




Selected Group of 

MEN'S 
WOMEN'S 

TENNISWEAR 

• DRESSES 

• SKIRTS 

• SWEATERS 

• SHORTS 



Wuhable 

Colors — 

Miny Stylos 

and Sizos 

Famous 

Namss 



UP TO 



5o:» 



o 




.^- 




ALL LEATHER 

BASEBALL 
SHOE 

by Spot-Bilt 

Padded In-sole 
NYLON OUTERSOLE 

98 



^•o^n 2 



SPECIAL PURCHASE 

BASEBALL 

and 
SOFTBALL 

BATS 



99 



( 




adidas 



ATHLETIC 

FOOTWEAR 

FOR EVERY 

SPORT 

lOOO'sTO 
CHOOSE FROM 



YOUR CHOICE 

FISHERMAN'S 
SPECIAL 




I 



A — Penn 720 Light Action Spinning Reel 
with 2-piece Fiberglass Rod Plus 200 
Yds. 8 lb. Test Sbakespeare - 7000 
Mono. 

B — Shakespeare 2170 Spinning Reel with 
2-piece Fiberglass Rod Plus 200 Yds. 
8 lb. Shakespeare 7000 Mono. 

C — Zebco SRL30 Spinning Reel Plus 2- 
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1630 HANCOCK ST. 
OPEN 9 to 9 - SAT. 5:30 



Page 4 Quincy Sun Thursday, July 18, 1974 




MARRIED - Mrs. Steven M. Johnson is the former Carol F. 
Anderson, daughter of Charles Anderson and Mrs. Ruth E. Gluftling, 
both of Quincy. Her husband, who lives in South Carolina, is the son 
of Russell Johnson and Mrs. Christine Johnson, both of Quincy. 
They were married in St. Joseph's Church, Quincy Point. The bride 
is a graduate of Quincy High School and works at Quincy City 
Hospital. Mr. Johnson is a graduate of Quincy High School and is in 
the U.S. Navy. After a wedding trip to Cape Cod, they will live in 
Ladson, S.C. 

[Miller Studio] 

Dianne McMillan Accepted 
At Rivier College 



Miss Dianne McMillan, 
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Francis 
S. McMillan of 189 Norfolk St.. 
Wollaston, has been accepted by 
Rivier College, Nashua, N.H., 
where she plans to major in 
English. 

She was graduated from 
North Quincy High School 

^ WoHaston^ 
* Florist — 



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compareI 

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WOLLASTON 



where she was a staff member of 
the school newspaper. The 
North Star. She also was active 
in the Girls' Bowling Club: the 
MadrigaJ Singers; and the 
Concert Choir. Additional 
honors included membership in 
the Chorus of the Southeast 
District and the New England 
Music Festivals, 




HARTS 
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Quincy, Mass ^**«wf^ 
773^2170 

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Births 



At Quincy City Hospital 

Julys 

Mr. and Mrs. Russell McLean, 
17 Ellington St., a daughter. 

July 6 

Mr. and Mrs. Harold Janus, 
260 Common St., a daughter. 

July? 

Mr. and Mrs. Giovanni 
Guanno, 71 South St., a son. 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert 
Mahoney, 192 Rhoda St., a 
daughter. 

Julys 

Mr. and Mrs. Allen MacLeod, 
57a East Squantum St., a 
daughter. 

Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Ford, 18 
Gridley St., a son. 

July 9 

Mr. and Mrs. Stanley 
Miarecki, 42 Yorktown St., a 
son. 

July 1 1 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert Arnold; 
21 Naval Terrace, a daughter. 

At St. Margaret's Hospital 
July 2 

Mr. and Mrs. Paul Daley, 22 
Centre St., a daugliter. 

Mr. and Mrs. James 
Fitzgerald. 3 Grace Road, a son. 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert Callow, 
72 West Flni Ave., a daughter. 

July 3 

Mr. and Mrs. Charles KabiJian, 
1 18 Greenleaf St., a daughter. 

July 6 

Mr. and Mrs. Paul McCabe, 85 
Norfolk St., a daughter. 

At South Shore Hospital 

July 7 

Mr. and Mrs. Lawrence 
Hennessy, 17 Moscow St., a son. 

At Mt. Auburn Hospital 

July 7 



Mr. and Mrs. 
Winkleman, 766 Willard 
daughter. 

July 1 1 

Mr. and Mrs. 
Frechette, 33 Payne St 



Henry 
St., a 



Laurent 
, a son. 



At Goddard Hospital 

July 8 

Mr. and Mrs. Duncan R. 
Saunders. 40 Yorktown St., a 
son. 



MICHELANGELO 
cotrruRK 

572 Columbian St. 

South Weymouth 

335-9668 




MISS ERIKA 

formerly of a 
Quincy Salon 

HAS JOINED 
OUR STAFF 




MARRIED " Mrs. Henry G. Chiarelli is the former Diane E. Frazier, 
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Bernard Frazier of Braintree. Her husband 
is the son of Mrs. Jacqueline Chiarelli of Quincy and Andrew 
Chiarelli of Revere. They were married in St. Thomas More Church, 
Braintree. The bride is a graduate of Braintree High School and is 
employed at Quincy District Court House. Mr. Chiarelli is a graduate 
of Braintree High School and the Honeywell Institute of 
Information Sciences. He is a manager of Radio Shack. After a 
wedding trip to Bermuda, they will live in Quincy. 

[Miller Studio] 




OCEANVIEW'S Family Night featured a birthday party for Mrs. 
Virginia Manning of Quincy [l^ft] , daughter of Qceanview resident 
Mrs. Edna Hatfield [right] . In center is Theresa Whitaker, president 
of the Ocean vi3W Tenants Association. Standing is Oceanview's 
Social Director Frank Kennedy. The first annual Family Night for 
residents of Oceanview and their families was held recently at the 
George Bryan VFW Post and was organized by Kennedy. 



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Quincy Sons Of Italy 
Social Center 

120 Quarry St., Quincy 

Newest function hall now available for weddings, showers, dinner, 
dances. Two tastefully decorated halls: The Venetian Room has 
mating up to 150: Golden Lion Suite up to 300. A room for the 
bnde at no extra cost, 

FOR RESERVATION CALL 773-1295 ANY EVENING 
OR 773 2687 AFTER 2 P.M. 




J 




Thursday, July 18, 1974 Quincy Sun Page S 



ENGAGED -- Mrs. Irving L. Himmel of 40 Virginia Rd, Merrymount, 
announces the engagement of her daughter Christina Louise Albison 
to Ronald Cardarelli, son of Mr. and Mrs. Hugo J. Cardarelli of 58 
Mary St., Quincy Point. Miss Albison is also the daughter of the late 
Thomas L. Albison. She is a graduate of Quincy High School and 
holds an associates degree, cum laude, from Garland Junior College. 
She will graduate from Framingham State College in January. Mr. 
Cardarelli attended Quincy High School and will graduate from 
Northeastern University in June, 1975. An April 27, 1975 wedding 

is planned. 

[Pagar Studio] 

Helen Curran Installed 
Women Of Moose Regent 



Mrs. Helen P. Curran was 
installed as senior regent of the 
Quincy chapter, Women of the 
Moose, recently at ceremonies in 
Moose Hall, East Braintree. 

Other officers installed 
included: 

Mrs. Mary Bourget, junior 
graduate regent; Mrs. Marguerite 
Pelokowicz, junior regent; Mrs. 
Mary Koslowsky, chaplain; Mrs. 
Agnes Reichert, treasurer. 

Mrs. Florence CouU, recorder; 
Mrs. Lucille Straughn, guide; 
Mrs. Rose Murphy, assistant 
guide; Mrs. Signe Whitehouse, 
sentinel; Mrs. Mary Amann, 
argus. 

Installing officers were Mrs. 
Doris Lyons, Mrs. Eloise Spear 
and Mrs. Florence Stewart. 

Special guests were Thomas 
Lang, governor of Moose; John 
Connaughton, pilgrim; Mrs. 
Louise Connaughton, past 
deputy grand regent; James 



Bourget, Edward Curran and 
David Barnett. 

Gifts were presented to the 
outgoing Senior Regent Mrs. 
Mary Bourget and members of 
the installing suite; a graduate 
regents jewel to Mrs. Blanche 
Barnett; and flowers to Helen 
Curran, Blanche Barnett and 
Mary Bourget. 

Chairmen appointed for the 
1974-1975 season included: 

Mrs. Gertrude Paakonen, 
college of regents; Mrs. Rose 
Drohan, star recorder; Jill 
Hanlon, publicity; Florence 
Stewart, mooseheart; Pamela 
Hoffman, library; Patricia 
McCarthy, social service. 

Si Si Glenn, child care; Mary 
Livingston, hospital; Eileen 
Ravino, membership; Eloise 
Spear, moosehaven; Catherine 
McLennan, academy of 
friendship; Blanche Barnett, 
ritual director. 



2 From Quincy To Attend Bunker Hill 



Michael C. Kenney of 14 
Audrey St., South Quincy and 
Michael S. Mafera of 156 
Squanto Rd, Merrymount, have 
been accepted for the fall 
semester at Bunker Hill 



Community College, 
Charlestown. 

The college will start its 
second year in September with 
an expected enrollment of 1,800 
students. 



1424 HANCOCK ST. 

QUINCY, MASS. 

471-8903 

565 WASHINGTON ST. 

WELLESLEY, MASS. 

235-4900 



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Marriage 
Intentions 



John A. M. Pecoraro, 82 
Glover Ave., Quincy, bank 
auditor; Linda J. Zona, 82 
Glover Ave., Quincy, credit 
assistant. 

Richard C. Albrecht, 39 
Bennington St., Quincy, student; 
Dolores M. DiLorenzo, 240 
Riverside Ave., Medford, 
registered nurse. 

George Plaskasovitis, 60 
Farrington St., Quincy, 
assembler; Maria Kalkakidis, 60 
Farrington St., Quincy, 
hairdresser. 

John J. Quinn Jr., 86 Grand 
View Ave., Quincy, admitting 
officer; Virginia T. Linnehan, 22 
Hazel St., Milton, registered 
nurse. 

John V. McLaughlin, 9 
Edgemere Road, Quincy, parole 
agent; Karen M. Seghezzi, 50 
Tirrell St., Quincy, teacher. 

Charles M. Sherman, 19 Trask 
St., Quincy, field service 
engineer; Elien-Rose Priscella, 42 
Roger St., Quincy, clerk typist. 

Richard D. Fitzpatrick, 322 
West Squantum St., Quincy, 
banker; Margaret R. O'Hare, 59 
Hamden Circle, Quincy, 
secretary. 

Paul Mosnicka, 41 Sharon 
Road, Quincy, sports editor; 
Blanche Lynch, 29 South 
Bayfield Road, Quincy, 
registered nurse. 

Richard A. Branca, 1152 
Brook Road, Quincy, rental 
representative; Elaine F. 
Meehan, 1 1 1 Pierjnont St., 
Quincy, dental assistant. 

John A. Mahoney, 44 North 
Payne St., Quincy, officer-U.S. 
Coast Guard; Diane M. 
Goodhue, 106 Lancaster St.,' 
Quincy, registered nurse. 

Kevin T. Shea, 101 Water St., 
Quincy, salesman; Mary C. 
O'Leary, 115 Bates Ave., 
Quincy, clerk. 

John F; Downey, 9 Payson 
Ave., Dorchester, printer; 
Patricia A. O'Neill, 141 Sea St., 
Quincy, secretary. 

Paul E. Heidke, 59 Revere St., 
Holbrook, truck driver; Christine 
M. Andrews, 83 Colby Rd, 
Quincy student. 

David A. King, 10 Presidential 
Drive, Quincy, industrial 
engineer; Elizabeth A. Tynan, 5 1 
Devon Rd, Norwood, teacher. 



Save Gas and Money .. 
shop locally. 



DERRINGER 

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FORMERLY 
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MARRIED - Mrs. William Mitchell, Jr. is the former Corinne 
Frances Donovan, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Edward Donovan of 104 
Glover Ave., North Quincy. Her husband is the son of Mr. and Mrs. 
William Mitchell of 148 Darrow St., Houghs Neck. They were 
married June 30 in Sacred Heart Church, North Quincy, Mrs. 
Mitchell is a graduate of North Quincy High School and Bridgewater 
State College where she majored in English. She teaches 9th grade 
English at Broad Meadows Junior High School. Mr. Mitchell 
graduated from Quincy High School and Bridgewater State College. 
He teaches social studies at Broad Meadows Junior High School and 
attends Suffolk University Law School nights. After a wedding trip 
to Montreal, the couple will live in Wollaston. 

[The Noursesl 

Seniors Trip To Spain Planned 

The Quincy Park and 
Recreation Board is sponsoring a 
seven-day Senior Citizens 
vacation to Majorca, Spain Aug. 
22-29. 



The trip will include 
transportation to and from 
Logan Airport, Boston, round 
trip jet transportation, 
accommodations at the Hotel 
Barbados including two meals 



daily, taxes, and all gratuities. 

Also on the program will be a 
half-day sightseeing tour of Calle 
Mayor and Palma; an afternoon 
cruise on a private yacht in 
Palma Harbor; and a farewell 
dinner at the Sony Mar Estate. 
Deadline for reservations is July 
17. Additional information can 
be obtained from Charles L. 
Alongi Jr., assistant director of 
recreation. 



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Appointments or Walk-in service - Open Thursday evenings 



Page 6Quincy Sun Thursday, July 18, 1974 



RIGHTS 'N' WRONGS 

Anniversary bash? 
not for a widow 



By RI\ TOBIN 
Copley News Ser\irc 

Dear Mrs. Tobin: 

I'm the spokesman for my 
four brothers and two sisters. 
Our father died two years ago, 
a week after he and mother 
celebrated their 48th wedding 
anniversary. I.,ast year both 
dates shpped by, apparently 
unnoticed by her. Now this 
year, as the anniversary date 
approaches, cur mother 
wants a real hoopla on her 
golden anniversary. She 
wants a tiered cake and my 
oldest brother is supposed to 
help her cut the first slice. To 
top it all off, she wants to wear 
her wedding dress. (It fits!) 
She gave me a list of some 70 
people she wants her children 
to invite to the party. Is this 
the proper type of party for a 
widow to give on her anniver- 
sary? Will people think she is 
getting senile? 

Eldest Sister 

Dear Eldest Sister: 

A widow does not celebrate 
her anniversary date with a 
bash. A small family gather- 
ing would be more proper. If 
you go the route your mother 
proposes, people will think 
you are all senile. 

Dear Mrs. Tobin: 

I have a large and expen- 
sive ring that 1 wear nearly all 
the time. It is impossible to 
get gloves over the high set- 
ting. Would it be permissible 
to wear the ring over the 



ALCOHOUC MILUONS 

An estiniated nine million 
Americans suffer from the 
disease of alcoholism. — CNS 



glove"' 

Jenny B. 

Dear Jenny: 

No. Willie it is proper to 
wear a brai'olel over a glove, 
a ring looks extreiiioly odd. If 
siiy, you are attending a 
luficheon where you will be 
removing youj" gloves, .slip the 
ring in your purse and put it 
on \our finger later. 

Dear Mrs. Tobin: 

What term of address 
should my once-a-week clean- 
ing woman use when she calls 
me'.' Right now she calls me 
"I^ady" or "Mrs." I don't 
think either is correct. 

Ella Watson 

Dear Ella : 

She should call you Mrs. 
Watson or Ma'am. Although 
"Miss," standing alone is cor- 
rect, "Mrs." is not. "l^dy" is 
used when strangers don't 
know each other's names as, 
"Lady! You forgot your 
glasses." In the situation you 
pose, your cleaning woman 
knows your name. "You're 
wanted on the phone, Mrs. 
Watson (or Ma'am)" is the 
form she should use. Be sure 
you call her by her name. 
"The shower doors need spe- 
cial attention this week, 
Martha," sounds better than a 
direct order. 

A problem? Send your ques- 
tion to Mrs. Riv Tobin, Copley 
News Service, in care of this 
newspaper. 

AMELIA EARHART 

On May 21, 1932, Amelia 
Earhart Putnam became the 
first woman to cross the At- 
lantic in solo flight. 



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ONCE OVER LIGHTLY 

'Psycho' solutions? try a little hug 



By ANN RUDY 

In a fascinating new book, 
"Psychofraud" (Whitmore) 
John David Garcia gives us 
all a neat Httle rule of thumb 
by which to evaluate all we 
have read and heard about 
almost all forms of psycho- 
therapy: forget it. 

This may not seem like any 
big news to you older readers 
who raised your children on 
love and common sense. You 
always knew, didn't you, tliat 
a hug around the shoulders or 
a nap usually cured most 
cases of "cranky kid." 

You weren't about to turn 
your child loose to tap dance 
on the coffee table or write on 
the walls with your lipstick to 
help him "cope." And by the 
time you knew you'd done 
everything right, it was too 
late to change it. 

But consider the case of a 
girl like I who married, and 
begat children, at the dawn of 
the age of Aquarius and arm- 
chair psychology. These 
were, and are, confusing 
times. 

I mean, when I first heard 
of Sigmund Freud I thought 
he was a Wagnerian baritone. 
But the girl next door — 
whose five "well-adjusted" 
children were always over at 
my house working out their 
aggressions — enlightened 
me and I tried to make up for 
what I thought was lost time. 

First, I read everything I 
could about psychology, hung 
around lecture halls and 
bought every new paperback 
on the latest "approach." 
Then I attempted to assimi- 
late this mass of often con- 
flicting information. 

Meanwhile, I was watching 
my kids for signs of irregular- 




Making up for lost time. 



ity. To my mother, irregular- 
ity meant get out the box of 
dried prunes, but to me it 
meant a kid who didn't sass 
me. 

"If you want to say you hate 
me, go ahead," I'd encourage. 
But it was no use; they re- 
spected me. And by the time 
they were in adolescence I 
was frantic. 

"Where have we gone 
wrong?" I asked my husband. 
"It was bad enough when they 
didn't bed wet, stutter or nose 




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pick, but they are almost 
grown now and showing no 
signs of rebellion or antisocial 
behavior. I know they are 
suppressing something, but 
what do you think it is?" 

"Judging from the boy's 
belches," replied my hus- 
band, "he is suppressing very 
little." 

And now along comes "Psy- 
chofraud" and John David 
Garcia's refreshing and sim- 
ple theory. I hope it's not too 
late, but I think I'll relax. 



CHARMING MUZAK 

Muzak, which began sup- 
plying music via telephone 
wire in the 1930s, operates 
throughout the United States 
and in 25 countries around the 
world. — CNS 



TWO CONVENIENT 
REASONS TO OPEN AN ACCOUNT 



BANK 



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Health 
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773-8100 



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I' very year tliousiinds of 
persons drown needlessly because 
they iynore rules that make 
swimming safe as well as 
pleasurable. Knowing how to 
swim well and receiving some 
accident prevention training are 
the most important safety 
measures of all. 

The primary rule when you arc 
in the water is never to swim 
alone. Children, whether or not 
they can swim, should never play 
in or around water without adult 
supervision. 

It is important that you not 
exceed your abilities by venturing 
out too far or trying to swim for 
too long a period. If trouble 
should occur, try to conserve 
your strength. If you are caught 
in a fast-moving cunent, swim 
diagonally across it. When 



someone else is in trouble, do not 
attempt a s\\ imming rescue unless 
you are trained in lifesavinp 
techniques. Instead, look for a 
buoyant object to throw to him 
or extend a pole for him to grab 
hold of. 

* * * 

This information has been 
brought to you as a public service 
by NABORHOOD PHARMACY, 
406 Hancock St., No. Quincy. 

OUR SERVICES INCLUDE: 

24 hour emergency service, 
Charge accounts, 
Family prescription records, 
Year end tax records, 
Delivery service, 
Insurance receipts, 
Hospital supplies for sale or rent, 
Open 7 days a week, 8 - 10. 
Phone: 773-6426 



Your Horoscope Guide 



For the Week of July 21-27 
By GINA, Copley News Service 
For more complete forecast, read indications for your 
Ascendant sign plus Birth sign. To find your Ascendant sign, 
count ahead from Birth sign the number of signs indicated. 



Timp of Birth: 

4 to 6 a.m. 

6 to 8 a.m. 

8 to 10 a.m. 

10 to 12 Noon 

Noon to 2 p.m. 

2 to 4 p.m. 

4 to 6 p.m. 

6 to 8 p.m. 

8 to 10 p.m. 

10 to Midnight 

Midnight to 2 a.m. 

2 to 4 a.m. 



Probable AacendanI is: 

Same as birth sign 

First sign following 

Second sign following 

Third sign following 

Fourth sign following 

Fifth sign following 

Sixth sign following 

Seventh sign following 

Eighth sign following 

Ninth sign following 

Tenth sign following 

Eleventh sign following 



ARIES: (March 21 to April 

19 — Also Aries Ascendant) — 
Domestic pressures lift and 
your attention can be focused 
on leisure-time and pleasure- 
type activities. Rapport with 
parents and older persons in- 
creases. Strengthen relation- 
ships. Use your creativity. 

TAURUS: (April 20 to May 

20 — Also Taurus Ascendant) 

— Your spirits lift as tensions 
ease. Good time to renovate, 
redecorate or repair your 
home. (Carefully oversee all 
work. Advice from your mate 
or a close personal friend 
could be very valuable — lis- 
ten! 

GEMINI: (May 21 to June 
20 — Also Gemini Ascendant) 

— Be realistic about finances. 
Good week for personal con- 
tacts to build good will. If 
planning on moving, select 
the new home with considera- 
tion for artistic beauty. En- 
tertainment involving all the 
family is favored. 

CANCER: (June 21 to July 
22 — Also Cancer Ascendant) 

— Good time to improve your 
personal appearance with 
clothes, hair style, etc. Use 
charm and consideration in 
pursuing your goals. Listen to 



constructive advice from 
friends. Curb extravagance. 

LEO: (July 23 to August 22 

— Also Leo Ascendant) — 
High energy continues and 
your outgoing activity will atr 
tract friends. You are making 
a good impression by just be- 
ing yourself. Activities 
around the home are favored 
too, such as gardening, redec- 
orating, etc. 

VIRGO: (August 23 to Sept. 
22 — Also Virgo Ascendant) — 

Biu'dens have lifted and you 
feel relaxed and ready for fun. 
Good time for a vacation, and 
some of you may be changing 
your residence now. Use cau- 
tion in signing documents — 
make sure it is what you real- 
ly want to do. 

UBRA: (Sept. 23 to Oct. 22 

— Also Libra Ascendant) — 

Concentrate on career, repu- 
tation, profession now. Take 
care of duty with a happy 
heart although the job may be 
distasteful. Be true to your 
values of consideration of oth- 
ers; resist dictatorial atti- 
tudes or dishonesty. 

SCORPIO: (Oct. 23 to Nov. 
21 — Also Scorpio Ascendant) 

— Make important contacts 
now while charisma is high. 



Air conditioners more efficient today 



About 20 years ago, a 7,500- 
BTU room air conditioner 
used 1,290 watts of power 
every hour, filled most of the 
window and extended out into 
the room. 

BEAUTY SECRET 

It was believed in ancient 
Europe and Britain that dew 
taken from a hawthorn tree 
before dawn on May Day 
would restore one's complex- 
iwi and preserve beauty. — 



Today's householder gets 
better performance from a 
7,600-BTU unit that uses just 
860 watts per hour and takes 
much less space. — CNS 



ANCIENT FX)OD FREEZE 

The first known govern- 
ment freeze on food prices 
took place in the year 2830 
B.C. in Egypt. — CNS 



See important people and pre- 
sent your pet projects. Advice 
on personal matters from a 
trusted friend could be helfh 
ful. Give attention to your ap- 
pearance. 

SAGITTARIUS: (Nov. 22 to 
Dec. 21 — Also Sagittarius As- 
cendant) — Keep up the good 
work on diet and physical fit- 
ness. Associations with those 
of similar interests are highly 
favored now. Be sure it isn't 
impulse leading you to the al- 
tar — true love stands the test 
of time. 

CAPRICORN: (Dec. 22 to 
Jan. 19 — Also Capricorn As- 
cendant) — The many 
changes you are encountering 
with bosses, jobs, etc. is just 
about over. The tug between 
profession and personal life 
can be resolved too. Looks 
like the worst is over. Concen- 
trate on the future. 

AQUARIUS: (Jan. 20 to 
Feb. 18 — Also Aquarius As- 
cendant) — Health appears 
good, but don't overindulge in 
food. Good time for a vacation 
or at least a trip of some kind. 
Pay attention to yoiu* dreams 
and "hunches." Much valu- 
able information is contained 
therein. 

PISCES: (Feb. 19 to March 
20 — Also Pisces Ascendant) 

— Accept invitations that are 
offered. Romance blossoms. 
Guard against extravagance 
and "playing hooky" from 
duties or responsibilities. 
Continue working on projects 

— develop them for later pre- 
sentation. 

Your personalized horo- 
scope and analysis are based 
on your birth date, place and 
time. The interpretations are 
included in a 115-page booklet. 
For information, write: Your 
Horoscope Guide, Copley 
News Service, in care of this 
newspaper. 



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QUINCY 479-1652 



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Thttfiday , July 18, 1974 Qirincy Spm Pn* 7 

YOUR HANDWRITING TELLS 

'G' loop shows 
restlessness 



By DOROTHY 

ST. JOHN JACKSON 

Certified Master 

Graphoanalyst 

Copley News Service 

Dear Dorothy; 

I have a problem throwing a 
fit whenever my husband 
comes home. He works a full- 
time day job, part-time bar- 
tends and goes to school one 
night a week. We have two 
toddlers and I stay home all 
the time. Can you help me? 

J.R. 

Dear J. R • 

Seems you're "barking up 
the wrong tree." If there's 
anything your husband 
doesn't need now is a fit- 
throwing wife. 

You want a little "center of 
the stage" treatment, seen in 
the upswing at the end of 
words, and you intend to get 
it, revealed in the small be- 
ginning hooks. A couple of 
"three-footers" hardly fill the 
bill. With your husband's 
thoughts turned toward mak- 
ing a living, you feel left out in 
the cold. So, to warm things 



up a bit, you throw a fit. 

You are restless and you 
don't like to be confined, seen 
in the long lower loop on the g. 
You want some variety^ You 
want to get away from the 
four walls. So, why don't you 
join a civic or church group 
and take your toddlers with 
you. Your two "little people" 
at a "big people's " meeting 
could bring you so much at- 
tention you wouldn't be able to 
budge. 

Appreciate your husband 
and his efforts, and contain 
yourself. Your fits, as such, 
are emotional .storms and 
they last only long enough to 
bring YOU into focus, seen in 
your light-pressured writing. 
Nevertheless, any storm on 
the sea of matrimony can toss 
your marriage ship off-course 
and will even weaken the rud- 
der. 

D.J. 

Selected letters will be 
answered in this column. To 
obtain the free pamphlet 
"Your T's Tell," write to 
Dorothy St. John Jackson, 
Copley News Service, in care 
of this newspaper. 






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Holbrook: Tues - Fn. noon-7 p.m.; Sat. 9 a.m. -2 p.m. 
Wareham: Tues.-Fri. 10 a.m.-6 p.m.; Sat. 9 a.m.-l p.m. 
Note: Offer good while supply lasts One frea gift per household. 



Page 8 Quincy Sun Thursday, July 18, 1974 



Women Of Moose 
To Meet July 24 



The newly-installed officers of 
the Quincy Chapter Women of 
the Moose filled their stations 
with Senior Regent Mrs. Helen 
P. Curran presiding. 

The officers will attend the 
annual Executive Board meeting 
in Waltham. 

The College of Regents 
Chapter Night was also held at 



this meeting. Mrs. Gertrude 
Paukonen hostessed the social 
hour held after the meeting. 

The next meeting of the 
organization is scheduled for 
Wednesday, July 24 at 7:45 p.m. 
in Moose Hall, 175 West Howard 
St., Braintree. Applications are 
being received for enrollment in 
future meetings. 




Super Summer Salads Ala Granny Smith 



2 From Quincy To Enter Trinity College 



Two Quincy youth will be 
among the 76 Massachusetts 
students to attend Trinity 
College in the fall. 

Marlene R. McDermott, 
daughter of Dr. and Mrs. Joseph 
E. McDermott of 9 Edwards 



Lane, Germantown, and Joseph 
A. Carroll, son of Mr. and Mrs. 
Lloyd V. Carroll of 236 Hollis 
Ave., North Quincy, will 
undergo several days of 
orientation along with 456 other 
freshmen. 



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style or restyle your hair for the new cool, summer look. 
Our expert personalized service will guarantee you the 
individual look of beauty. Easy to care for styles for 
summer -- also Blow Cuts, Coloring, Frosting and 
Permanents - Long or Short! 

Drop in and enjoy a cup of coffee witti us. 
^iinouette of (I5eautu 

364 Sea Street - Adams Shore 
Quincy 479-9218 

Open Tuesday thru Saturday 

SENIOR CITIZEN'S SPECIALS ON TUESDAYS 



How kicky we are that New 
ZcalanJ has seasons opposite 
onrsl Because that's the reason 
those beautiful Granny Smith 
apples are with us ritsht now. 
These tanpy. juicy, crisp apples 
are just what we need to spark 
summer salads. 

Of course, New Zealam! 
Granny Smith apples arc with- 
out compare when it comes to 
being a complete all-purpose 
apple. 1 hcy"re prcat to cat, but 
absolutely superb to cook with. 
Their flavor is so applcy and 
fresh that you don"t even need 
to add sugar when making apple 
sauce. And what they do for 
pies, tarts and all the good 
apple dishes! 

They're only on the market 
for about 3 months, so do enjoy 
them while they're here. 

Here are a couple of real fa- 
vorite Granny Smith salads. 

Griinny Smith Applc-Bcct Sulud 

1 16 oz. French style beets, 

drained 
1 cup unsweetened apple 

juice 
3 cups coarsely grated 

(irann>' Smith apples 

(about 3 apples) 
I cup whipping cream, 

whipped 
1 2 teaspoon cinnamon 
1 teaspoon lemon juice 
ilash of Siilt 

Drain beets thoroughly. Add 
apple juice and let stand an 
hour or lonuer. Drain ai-ain and 




^J"! ' 



""Vi 



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^e>^ /liilaiid Cirann\ .Smith apples hriiiK two cxcitinK salads (o 
\our Miinnur menus. Coiiiplilcly difrcrcnt iiiid both tantalizing. 



add apples. Fold in whipped 
cream and cinnamon, salt and 
lemon juice. Serve on a lettuce 
lined platter oi boul. 

.Summer Salad .Marinade 

. 2 large tomatoes, sliced in 
wedges 
2 cored ami sliced but not 
peeled New Zealand 
(Iriinny Smith iipplcs 
l.'i to ' j cup fresh Hermuda 
union rings 

1 cup wine \ineg;ir 
' 'i cup oil 

2 t;iblespoons cliojiped onion 
' J teaspoon MSd 

'. J teiispoon pepper 



Vi teaspoon salt 

Vz teaspoon sugar 

I'l teaspoon minced garlic 

Arrange tomatoes, apples and 
onions in layers in a bowl. Com- 
bine remaining ingredients in a 
blender and blend well. Pour 
over the tomato apple mixture 
ami let stand for at least 30 to 
40 minutes in the refrigerator. 
I o serve, ilrain off excess dress- 
ing but don't throw it away! 
Store in the refrigerator and use 
for dressing a green salad. Ar- 
range the marinated apples and 
vegetables in a glass bowl for 
mavimum enjoyment of the 
cok>rs. 



It may be hard to believe, but 
the handful of tomato plants in 



Your Tomato Plants Help Cause 



CFEAm 



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At Old Fashioned Prices 

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CUSTOM CAKES 

and PASTRIES 

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Wedding and Shower Decorations, Birthday and Party Cakes, ^ 
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Specializing in: CANOLI-PANETONI- 

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DISTINCTIVE COOKIES 



your back yard is helping to 
keep food prices down 
throughout the country, suggest 
the Massachusetts Department 
of Agriculture (MDA). 

It's not just that your own 
produce will save you a few 
dollars over the growing season, 
though that's certainly a benefit. 



It's the reduced demand for 
commercial produce by several 
million home gardeners that 
takes the pressure off the 
market, and by that much leaves 
more produce to go around, says 
the MDA. When supply is short 
and demand is long, prices 
climb. That's what inflation is all 
about. 



GOOD and FRUITY 

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Braintree, Opp. Quintree Mall 
THURS., FRI., 8 TO 8 DA'LY 8 TO 6 



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'Complete Selection of Italian Specialties" 



Thursday, July 18, 1974 Quincy Sun Page 9 



8 From Quincy 
On Stonehill Dean^s List 



Eight Quincy students have 
been named to the Dean's List at 
Stonehill College in Easton. 

Three of the eight are recent 
graduates of the college. They 
are Gail DeThomaso, daughter 
of Mr. and Mrs. Carmen 
DeThomaso of 135 
Independence Ave., South 
Quincy, graduating with highest 
honors; Kevin Flaherty, son of 
Mr. and Mrs. John Flaherty, 65 
Common St., West Quincy, 
graduating with honors; and 
George Knasas, son of Mr. and 
Mrs. Alfred Knasas., 63 Summer 
St., Quincy, graduating with 
high honors. 

^ther students on the Dean's 



List are: 

Joanne Polito, daughter of 
Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Polito, 50 
Hillside Ave., Wollasto^i, a junior 
with high honors; Joseph 
Gaudiano, son of Mr. and Mrs. 
Philip Gaudiano, 293 Franklin 
St., South Quincy, a sophomore 
with high honors; Theodora 
Bourikas, daughter of Mr. and 
Mrs. Nick Bourikas, 34 St. Ann's 
Rd, Wollaston, a sophomore 
with hono'rs; Mary Evelyn 
Gaudiano, daughter of Mr. and 
Mrs. Philip Gaudiano, a 
freshman with honors; and 
Rosanne Viegas, daughter of Mr. 
and Mrs. Aristide Viegas, 95 
Butler Rd, Quincy, a freshman 
with high honors. 



Walter Martinson Delegate 
To Kiwanis Convention 




Walter E. Martinson of 1304 
Quincy Shore Drive was a 
delegate to the 59th Annual 
Convention of Kiwanis 
International held recently in 
Denver, Col. 

Approximately 20,000 
persons attended the three-day 
convention. Delegates 
represented some 276,000 
Kiwanians in 6,315 Kiwanis 
Clubs in 45 countries. They 
participated in the election of 
Kiwanis International officers 
and trustees, formulated 
resolutions and amended the 
organization's constitution. 

Convention activities included 
an address by Archbishop 
Fulton J. Sheen, Kiwanis 

Dr. Picconi 

On Hospital 

Courtesy Staff 

Dr. Frank J, Piconi of Quincy 
is one of six physicians recently 
elected to the Courtesy Staff of 
South Shore Hospital, South 
Weymouth. 

Dr. Piconi is certified by the 
American Board of Pediatrics 
and his sub-specialty is allergy. 
He has a clinical fellowship in 
allergy at Children's Hospital 
Medical Center, Boston, and was 
a clinical fellow in pediatrics at 
Harvard Medical School for the 
past two years. 

A graduate of the College of 
Medicine and Dentistry of New 
Jersey and the College of the 
Holy Cross, Worcester, Dr. 
Piconi served a residency in 
pediatrics at Jackson Memorial 
Hospital, Miami. He interned at 
Newark City Hospital. 






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International President William 
M. Eagles, M.D., and American 
humorist Sam Levenson. 



AWARD RECIPIENTS AT the Quincy YMCA's 82nd annual awards dinner are "Girl of the Year" 
Laurien Houde of Norwell and "Boy of the Year" James Megnia of 9 Brockton Ave., Germantown, 
board director A. Wendell Clark, who received a special tribute and citation for 55 years of dedicated 
service and Norman F. Collier, who received a Paul Revere bowl as winner of the Benjamin F. 
Hodgkinson memorial award for outstanding service to the YMCA. YMCA President Floyd J. Folmsbee 
presents the awards as toastmaster Dr. V. James DiNardo looks on. 



SOUTH SHORE 
HATIONAL 

VS. 

THE SAVINGS 
BANKS 



A savings account at a savings bank will pay you about V4 % more than 
a savings account at South Shore National Bank. 

For most people, who average somewhere under $1000 in savings, 
that comes to around $3 a year. 

So we say, put your savings into South Shore National, in a 
Multistatement account. 

We'll give you free checking. 

And 10% refunds on the interest you pay on your loans. 

And you'll come out way ahead with us. (We're beating the savings 
banks at their own game.) 



THE MULTlSTATtMEMT PACKAGE: 



FREE CHECKING, 10* REFUND OF THE PAID FINANCE CHARGES ON 
ANY INSTALMENT LOAN OF $1500 OR MORE WHICH IS PUT ON MULTI- 
STATEMENT WITHIN 90 DAYS FROM THE DATE OF THE LOAN. MAXIMUM 
INTEREST ALLOWABLE BY LAW ON ALL SAVINGS REQUIREMENTS: ( 1) 
MULTISTATEMENT CUSTOMER MUST HAVE CHECKING ACCOUNT AND AT 



LEASTONE SAVINGS OR NOW. ACCOUNT WITH SOUTH SHORE NATIONAL 
BANK; ( 2) MINIMUM TOTAL MONTHLY BALANCE SPREAD AMONG ALL AC- 
COUNTS: $200. ALSO AVAILABLE: CLUB ACCOUNTS, AUTOMATIC SAVINGS 
PLAN, AUTOMATIC LOAN PAYMENT PUVN, CHECK CREDIT. THE STATUS OF 
ALL ACCOUNTS IS REPORTED MONTHLY ON ONE SIMPLE STATEMENT 



1400 HANCOCK STREET. QUINCY. MASSACHUSETTS 02169 



MEMBER FDIC 



r 



Hm lOQuiMy Sm Tkiindiy, July It. If74 




Chimneys At Adams 
Birthplaces Being Pointed 



QUINCY PLACQUE - Guy S. Faielta, chairman of the Quincy Board or Hegistrars, presents placque 
from Mayor Walter Hannon to Ambassador John A. Voipe at dedication of international terminal at 
Logan Airport in Volpe's honor. Looking on are Edward Hanley [lef ] secretary-treasurer of the 
Massachusetts Port Authority and Edward King, president of the Massachusetts Port Authority. 

Tobin Hopes To Overturn 
Adverse Report On 'Garbage' Bill 

Ronald Kaufman, representing 
Councillor James A. Sheets. 

No opposing arguments were 
voiced at the hearing. 

According to Senator Arthur 
H, Lewis, chairman of the Local 
Affairs Committee, committee 
members believe that the 
trash-garbage dispute is a local 
one between Mayor Hannon and 
Quincy's City Council. 

But members believe, too, 
Lewis added, that the bill usurps 
the power of mayors - in all 
cities - not merely in Quincy. 



Work has started on the 
pointing of the chimneys of the 
birthplaces of Presidents John 
and John Quincy Adams on 
Franklin St., South Quincy. 

The chimneys have been in 
need of repair for sometime, 
Quincy Heritage, the city's 
bicentennial and 350th 
Anniversary agency, called in 
David Hart, an expert in 
restoration and preservation, and 
a staff member of the Society 
for the Preservation of New 
England Antiquities, to make an 
evaluation of the project. 

Because the bricks in the 
chimneys were made before 
1800, a special formula for the 
mortar must be used. The bricks 
themselves are quite soft, 
requiring a mortar with high 



lime content. This provides for 
expansion and contraction due 
to weather changes. 

Hart will continue to serve as 
a consultant to Quincy Heritage, 
reports Executive Director John 
R. Graham. 

"Hart developed the X-ray 
method for photographing the 
internal structure of historic 
buildings," said Rev. Graham. 
"He will be doing an evaluation 
of the birthplaces so that we can 
make certain these magnificent 
farm houses can be cared for 
property over the years." 

Hart will also make 
recommendations concerning 
the nation's first blast furnace 
on Crescent St. 

The chimney repair will take 
about three days. 



QCA Recommends 
'Master Plan For Quincy' 



Senator-Council President 
Arthur Tobin, will attempt to 
overturn an adverse report on a 
bUl that would give local 
communities the right to decide 
on combined garbage-trash 
collection. 

Tobin told The Quincy Sun 
he will lobby his colleagues in an 
effort to overturn the adverse 
verdict, from the Local Affairs 
Committee, noting, "I've 
overturned a few in my life." 

"I have a good reputation 
with my colleagues. Perhaps I 



can persuade them to go along 
with the bill." 

The Tobin-Delahunt bill was 
automatically squashed by Joint 
Rule 10, which dictates an 
adverse decision when a bill has 
been in committee over 10 days. 
On Monday, the Local Affairs 
Committee heard arguments 
favoring a separate collection of 
trash and garbage from Tobin, 
Delahunt and four colleagues: 
Rep. Thomas F. Brownell, Rep. 
aifford H, Marshall, Ward 1 
Councillor Leo J. Kelly, and 



Brownell, Delahunt Support Tax Rebates 



Reps. Thomas F. Brownell 
ID-Quincy] and William D. 
Delahunt ID-Quincy] have 
joined 52 other legislators to file 
legislation that would give 
property tax rebates to 
homeowners and tenants 
through a state income tax 
credit. 



The proposal would allow up 
to $500 relief from property 
taxes based on the principle that 
people with incomes under 
$10,000 should not pay more 
than 8 per cent of their income 
on property taxes. 

Said Brownell: 

"It gives large families and 



retired people a much-needed 
break in their taxes, while 
maintaining the right of cities 
and towns to collect local 
property taxes and pay for 
essential municipal services." 

Hearings on the bill were held 
Tuesday [April 16) in the State 
House's Gardner Auditorium. 



In an open letter to Geoffrey 
A. Davidson, director of the City 
Department of Planning and 
Community Development a 
number of recommendations 
calling for an in-depth study are 
advanced by Pasquale S. 
DiStefano, president of the 
Quincy Citizens' Association. 

On Feb. 25 a public hearing 
was held by the City CouncU on 
petition of the association to 
request a 10-story building 
limitation within the city. 
Among the recommendations 
made by the association was that 
the city make an in-depth study 
to ascertain the total number of 
apartment units constructed in 
the city in the past five years 
including a comparative analysis 
of tax revenues realized from the 
construction as compared to the 
cost of necessary city services 
rendered each development. 

DiStefano said the 
recommendations were not 
acknowledged but praised "the 




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the aedit card that's honored at over one million locations symbol. Sign up for a BankAmericard today, at Quincy 

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initiative of the city in obtaining 
federal funds to implement the 
study." 

In addition the Quincy 
Citizens' Association notes what 
DiStefano says are practical 
suggestions": 

• The primary focus of the 
study is correct but must include 
the entire study of "Density" 
which must be scrutinized and 
re-examined due to the levels of 
density allowed by the planners. 

^ Individuals from the 
community should serve on the 
study team to off-set city 
employees and members of the 
Planning Team. 

• On completion of the study 
a "Master Flan for Quincy" and 
its future should be developed 
by the planners. This is 
necessary for a safe and 
intelligent growth pattern not 
solely for the business sector as 
so many previous studies have 
concentrated on. 

In view of these 
considerations the Quincy 
Citizens' Association requests 
that it authorize the 
appointment of a member of the 
Association to join with the 
city's study team at evening 
meetings with full voting rights. 

Joseph Scalata 
Ends Active Duty 

Navy Aviation Structural 
Mechanic Third Class Joseph B. 
Scalata, son of Mr. and Mrs. 
Charles J. Scalata of 175 Liberty 
St., South Quincy, completed 
two weeks of annual active duty 
for training with Intermediate 
Maintenance Support Unit 
23Z-1 at the Naval Air Station, 
North Island, Calif. 

Scalata drills one weekend a 
month with the unit at the Naval 
Air Reserve Station, South 
Weymouth. 

Daniel Spencer 
Marine Corporal 

Marine Cpl. Daniel K. 
Spencer, son of Mr. and Mrs. 
Lawrence E, Spencer of 32 
Bicknell St., Germantown, was 
promoted to his present rank 
while serving with the 1st Marine 
Division at the Marine Corps 
Base, Camp Pendleton, Calif. 

Brenda Ricciardi 
Accepted At Berklee 

Berklee College of Music has 
accepted Brenda Ricciardi of 
22V4 Buckley St., West Quincy, 
in its Division of Private Study. 



Thursday, July 18, 1974 Quincy Sun Page 1 1 



Sunbeams 



Purchasing Agent Post 
Up For Grabs 

By HENRY BOSWORTH 

Four or five reportedly are in the running for the $13,100 city 
purchasing agent's job soon to be open. 

Richard Nevvcomb, present purchasing agent, will be moving to 
Quincy City Hospital as an assistant director and a $4,000 salary 
boost. 

Insiders report Quincy Point businessman Beau Page, well known 
in political circles, could have had the purchasing agent's job. But, 
they say, he's riding the wrong horse in the Norfolk County slicrilTs 
race. 

Mayor Walter Hannon is backing Rep. -Councillor Clifford 
Marshall. Page is one of the keymen in Norfolk County 
Commissioner George McDonald's bid for the sheriffs badge. 

Just one of those sticky political things, they say. 

GOVERNOR SARGENT has an appointment to fill on the 
Quincy Housing Authority but doesn't seem to be in much of a rush 
to do it. 

The five-year term of Frank McCauley, Quincy school 
committeeman and bank president, expired some weeks ago. 
McCauley, who has done a good job on the board, has been left to 
sort of dangle ever since. 

The word around is that the Department of Community Affairs is 
trying to get Sargent's ear to convince him to name a woman to the 
post. A woman who is either a former tenant or present tenant of 
one of the Quincy public housing facilities. 

¥** 

SPEAKING OF WOMEN, friends are convinced that Mrs. Grace 
Saphir will toss her hat back into the mayoralty ring next year. 

Mrs. Saphir, a political novice, surprised the so-called experts last 
year when she polled 10,416 votes to Mayor Hannon's 15,492. 

Incidentally, friends report she's planning [or already is] to write 

a book on election procedures. 

*** 

HERE'S ONE: Howard Gunnison of the Wickens and Troupe 
Funeral Home purchased two acres of woodland in Sidney, Me., just 
outside of Augusta a year ago. He has a well on the land and there's 
some good pulpwood there. He just received his first real estate tax 
bill. Would you believe: 76 cents! 

Howard, who is quite familiar with Quincy's tax rate, couldn't 
believe it. He called the Sidney tax department. 

Ahyer, they said. It's 76 cents allright. 

"It probably jumped two or three cents from a year ago," he 
muses. 

WELL, give a little credit to Mary Jane Fandel of Grand View 
Ave., Wollaston for the settlement of the General Dynamics shipyard 
strike. 

She works in the office of Woliaston's John J. Sullivan, and 
several other federal mediators. And spent two long nights typing 
the agreement reached by management and Local 5. 

Without her, they wouldn't have had anything to sign. 

QUINCY'S Walter Martinson is back from the Kiwanis 
Convention in Denver where he was a delegate. One interesting item 
on the agenda was whether women should be admitted as members. 
The boys turned it down by a wide margin. 

S.S. Chamber Wins Award 



The South Shore Chamber of 
Commerce has been recognized 
for outstanding work in its 
publications by the 
Communications Council of the 
American Chamber of 
Commerce Executives. 

A First Place Award for the 
South Shore Chamber's Program 
of Work and Annual Report 
publications has been voted. 

Paul J. Greely Jr., Manager of 
Communications Council 
operations said: "Close to 200 
Chambers of Commerce 
submitted 400 different entries 



in this years Communications 
Evaluation Program, the 
evaluation felt it important to 
single out entries deserving of 
special rec ognition. 
Congratulations on your 
outstanding communications 
effort!" 

In accepting the award, Eric 
M. Swider, Executive 
Vice-President of the South 
Shore Chamber said, "keeping 
Chamber members well 
informed leads to involvement 
and involvement is the key to a 
Chamber's success." 



Food Stamp 

Meetings 
Next Week 

The use of U.S. Department 
of Agriculture Food Stamps will 
be explained by Nutrition 
Education Program Assistants in 
two Quincy locations next week. 

On Wednesday, July 24 at 2 
p.m. there will be answers given 
to questions at the 
Lincoln-Hancock School from 
1 2: 30 until 2 p.m. On Thursday, 
July 25 another session will be 
held at St. Boniface Church, in 
Germantown at the same time. 

Information to be discussed 
will be who is eligible; where to 
apply; how to use food stamps; 
and where they can be used. 
Those who are eligible are low 
wage earners; part time workers; 
and those who have high 
medical, dental, or necessary 
household expenses. 

Applications, information, 
and assistance may be obtained 
at either the Germantown 
Service Center, 9 Bicknell St. 
[Telephone 471-1 189] or at the 
South-West Community Center, 
372 Granite St. [Telephone 
471-0796]. 

Commission 

Favors 
Restoration 

The Quincy Conservation 
Commission has yoted in favor 
of the acquisition, upgrading and 
preservation of the Bunker Hill 
Quarry and the First Railroad 
Site in West Quincy as a historic 
landmark for the City of 
Quincy. 

The site of the old railway 
built to haul Quincy granite for 
construction of the Bunker Hill 
Monument in 1825, has been in 
ruins for many years. 



PoeVs Corner 



Undeserving 

Dear father in Heaven above, 

We, your children that we 
know you love, 

Send up our Praise to you, 

Although the words we have 
are few. 

Imagine how you loved us so, 

You let your very own son go. 

I know you gave your Son for 
me 

When he was nailed to that 
tree. 

In Calvary his precious blood 
flows, 

And washes our sins and saves 
our souls. 

Now he lives - this we know, 

For God's words tell us so. 

If we open our hearts and let 
God inside 

We will live on, long after we 
die. 

Irene Kaiser 

44 Morningside Path 

Weymouth 



Save Gas and Money 
shop locally. 



,_>Lii-nfiri I ■■-■■■•■ 



For Home 
Delivery 



t^^^^^^^^ 



**#. 



Call 
471-3100 



PRE-KINDERGARTEN 

Quincy Point Congregational Church 

444 Washington St., Quincy 



School Opens September 9th. Morning classes for 3 'A 
and 4 year olds. Completely non-sectarian. Tuition 
$8.00 per week. Limited Transportation available. 
For further information call 773-6424 between 9 
A.M. a„d 4:30 P.M., Tuesday thru Friday. 



Living, Today 

By Dr. WHIiam F. Knox 
Personal Counse 



'Is Everybody Unhappy?^ 



As I was eating in a Chinese 
restaurant after late hours in 
counseling, a friend came in. 
He's the kind of friend who's 
interested in people and asks 
probing questions. 

"You know" ... Don said ... 
"Seems that everybody 1 know 
is either having an affair ... or is 
getting divorced ... or is terribly 
unhappy. What's happening. 
Bill?" 

In my daily counseling 
naturally it seems that way to 
me, too. But of course ... 
counselors are seeing the people 
who are trying to improve their 
situation." And there are many. 

"Why are people so unhappy 
with their mates?" Don pressed 
me. 

I can see several reasons for 
the unrest. For one thing ... 
people are learning to love 
themselves more ... to be ones 
own best friend ... to have more 
respect for one's self. That 
means that a woman married to 
a man who has a drink problem 
for example, is not interested 
any more in "learning how to 
live with it" ... or feeling "this is 
the bed I made ... I must lie in 
it." She wants relief from this 
"ball and chain". In these times 
when money and jobs are more 
available to women, with a little 
guidance ... and support ... she 
seeks a better life .. and often 
she finds it. 

Men, on the other hand, are 
out there in the world of action, 
away from the home problems 
of children ... bill collectors ... 
neighbor conflicts ... meeting 
men and women working 
together, excha nging 
pleasantries, who give and 
receive respect. If when they 
arrive home they are hit with a 
barrage of demands ... criticisms 
... and unnecessary disorder ... 
they are likely to be seeking a 
better life without all this 

• Letter Box 



foolish hassle. 

Probably ... the script that a 
man or woman follows hasn't 
really changed that much. You 
are just becoming more aware ... 
less starry-eyed about his big car 
(a liability now), her beautiful 
face and figure which have a way 
of fading. At last you see each 
other as you really are ... often 
you don't like what you see. 
These disappointed husband and 
wives ... often turn to someone 
else ... or to the divorce court. 

The phenonomen of a grown 
woman still looking for the 
daddy she didn't have as she was 
growing up ... and still acting out 
the little ghl saying "take care of 
me" ... is not as attractive to a 
husband as to the teen age lover 
boy. 

That phenonomen of a grown 
man still acting like a little boy 
... irresponsible ... unsharing ... 
uncommunicative, wanting his 
wife to mother him ... get him 
up in the morning ... piclc up his 
clothes after him ... just one of 
the four children, becomes a 
drag for the capable wife. 

The amazing thing is that 
some have stayed so long in 
these self-defeating relationships. 
But PEOPLE CAN CHANGE. I 
see it happening daily in the 
stream of people passing through 
our offices. These husbands and 
wives want something better in 
hfe ... and many have concluded 
that it's now or never. 

"Unfortunately, Dan" ... I 
told my friend ... "for too many 
the love has eroded ... the 
incentive to try has gone ... the 
easier course is divorce. Some 
still have love ... and hope sends 
them to the counselor." 

He sipped another cup of 
Chinese tea. I wondered if Dan 
was speaking about all those 
other unhappy friends of his or 
was his probing question really 
about Dan. 



Makes 3 Points On 
Garbage-Trash Collection 



Editor, Quincy Sun: 

Quincy citizens should be 
aware of three principles for a 
recap of the garbage-rubbish 
brouhaha. 

Point 1 - Garbage should be 
considered a valuable resource. 
Since it is organic, it can feed 
pigs. It also can be used to 
originate gaseous fuel. When 
decomposed, it provides 
precious humus, capable of 
enriching soil to retain water and 
supply plant nutrients. 

Point 2 - Quincy quarry holes 
should also be considered a 
valuable local resource for 
receiving solid, compact rubbish 
from within its boundaries. 

But, our present dump is not 
valued for its uniqueness. It is 
being obliterated as rapidly as 
possible. Many trucks, from out 
of town, are filling the quarry 



hole after regular hours. Thus, 
new real estate for private 
condominium development is 
being created. 

Quincy's locale cannot be 
compared to other 
communities', which either 
incinerate or have adequate 
LEVEL land for proper dry 
sanitary landfill. Wet spoil, 
dredged from Black's Creek, 
negates the sun's heat and drying 
action. Remember, pestilence 
cannot be confined to a quarry 
hole, nor to one section of our 
city! 

The crux of the issue {Point 
3] is that of local government in 
America. Do the citizens, 
through theh elected council, 
have a voice in running their 
city, or, is it "taxation without 
representation"? 

Louise Hatch Meservey 
43 Park St., Wollaston 



Women's & Men's 



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July 18, 19 and 20 

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Page 12 Quincy Sun Thursday, July 18, 1974 



DEATHS 



Raymond P. Thayer, 60, of 
Redwood City, Calif., formerly 
of Quincy, at Veterans 
Administration Hospital, Palo 
Alto, Calif, July 9. 

Mrs. Anna C. I Peterson] 
Jepsen, 89, of WOO Southern 
Artery, at a Braintree nursing 
home, July 9. 

Mrs. Annie I. [Mcleod J 
Wardwell, 81, of 21 Abigail 
Ave., at Quincy Gty Hospital, 
July 11. 

Mrs. Corinne /LastraJ 
Murphy, 54, of Beacon Hill, 
Boston, formerly of Quincy, at 
Mass. General Hospital, Boston, 
July 11. 

Clifford M. Cox, 60, of 85 
Fayette St., in Brooks Hospital, 
Brookline, July 10. 

Mrs. Alice G. [Corey] Rowell, 
79, of 12 Elderly Drive, 
Randolph, formerly of Quincy, 
at the Brae Burn Nursing Home, 
Whitman, July 11. 

Jack W. Burnham, 74, of 173 
Billings Rd, at Mass. General 
Hospital, Boston, July 10. 

Mrs. Mary A. [McLeod] 
Keenan, 91, of 184 Albatross 
Rd, at the Morse Hospital, 
Natick, July 12. 

Everett F. Conway, 60. of 17 
Rowley St., at University 
Hospital, Boston, July 12. 

Mrs. Elizabeth M. [Shimers] 
Wagner, 93, of 32 Maxim Place, 
at a Boston nursing home, July 
10. 



K:y.:\'.'.'.:\:v,:\;'.c.:cCt'-:>'CtV.'<;:' 






ROY'S 
FLOWERS 

94 WASNIM6T0N ST 
QKimCY 

MAJOR CREDIT 
CARDS ACCEPTED^ 
BY PHONE 

472 -If 00, 



«^^^^^^ 




Mrs. Concettina M. 
[Masciarelli[ Piergrossi, 89, of 
430 Adams St., at Quincy City 
Hospital, July 10. 

Mrs. Agnes [Taggart] McKim, 
75, of 23 Lawn Ave., at Milton 
Hospital, July 9. 

Miss Honora Healy, 92, of 29 
Euclid Ave., at Quincy City 
Hospital, July 9. 

John H. Matthews, 79, of 139 
Davis St., July 7. 

Gerald L Richards, 51, of 51 
King Cove Road, North 
Weymouth, formerly of Quincy 
at the Veterans Administration 
Hospital, Jamaica Plain, July 9. 

Mrs. Elizabeth A. [GlawsonJ 
Cusick, 52 Ballou St., at Quincy 
City Hospital, July 9. 

Joseph F. Flaherty, 52, of 24 
Vane St., at his home, July 9. 

Mrs. Doris J. [Pelitier] Flynn, 
68, of 102 Ruggles St., at the 
Mass. Rehabilitation Hospital, 
Boston, July 8. 

John A. Bruno, 62, of 30 
Newcomb St., unexpectedly at 
his home, July 8. 

Raymond Cosgrove, 70, of 75 
Chapman St., at Jewish 
Memorial Hospital, Roxbury, 
July 7. 

Gerald H. Alexander, 63, of 
275 Fayette St., at Mass. 
General Hospital, Boston, July 
8. 

Mrs. Anna [Sullivan] Barrell, 
84 of Quincy, at a Braintree 
nursing home, July 8. 

Albert A. Delaney, 71, of 90 
White St., at home, July 10. 

Rocco DiTullio, 87, of 44 
Lancaster St., at Quincy City 
Hospital, July II. 

Walter L. Ericson Jr., 32, of 
Cape May, N.J., formerly of 
Quincy, at a hospital in Toms 
River, N.J., July 10. 

Mrs. Dorothy M. [Phipps] 
Anderson, 61, of 126 Willow St., 
at Quincy City Hospital, July 
10. 



why we 





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Membership in NSM 

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careful scrutiny of each firm's quality of 
service and record of performance. Our 
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You can count on it. 




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KEOHANE FUNERAL HOME 



333 Hancock St. 



785 Hancock St. 



773-3551 




COURT OF HONOR - Eagle Scouts Russ«ll Borman [left! and Richard T. Nord receive congratulatory 
resolutions of the State Senate from Sen. Arthur H. Tobin [right] as Richard F. Nord, scoutmaster of 
Troop 42, St. John's Church, looks on. 

Richard Nord, Russell Borman 
Receive Eagle Scout Awards 



Two Quincy youths were 
awarded Eagle Scout rank at 
court of honor ceremonies in St. 
John's School Hall. 

They are Richard Nord, a 
senior at North Quincy High 
School, and Russell Leo 
Borman, a sophomore at Quincy 
High School. 

They also received 
presentations from Mayor Walter 
J. Hannon and from Sen. Arthur 
H. Tobin, plus letters of 
commendation from Sens 
Edward M. Kennedy and 



Edward R. Brooke and Rep. 
James A. Burke. 

Nord, who is junior assistant 
scoutmaster of Troop 42 at St. 
John's, supervised a Christmas 
tree recycling program at the 
Blue Hills area as his Eagle 
project. 

He is a member of the North 
Quincy High Chess Club. He did 
volunteer work with the YMCA 
junior life-saving group. His 
hobbies are hiking and sailing 
and his career interest is marine 
biology. 



Borman worked ^ivith Putnam 
Borden, director of the Council 
on Aging, in schcduhng scout 
visits to Quincy nursing homes 
to entertain or run errands for 
patients. 

He holds the Ad Altare Dei 
Medal, one of catholic scouting's 
highest awards, and is an 
instructor with Troop 42. At 
Quincy High, he is a member of 
the chess club, debating team, 
junior achievement program, 
band and band council. 



Beth Israel Synagogue To Dedicate 
'Morris Silverman Social HalV 



Beth Israel Synagogue will 
dedicate the social hall and 
chapel in honor of Morris 
Silverman, a former president of 
the Synagogue. 

The memorial will be called 



"Morris Silverman Social Hall". 

Silverman held office at the 
Synagogue for 22 years. He was 
a life-long resident of Quincy. 

Rabbi Jacob Mann will 
conduct the dedication service 



on Sunday, Aug. 1 1 at 8:30 a.m. 
in the Synagogue on Grafton St., 
Quincy Point. Hosting a 
post-service breakfast are the 
Brotherhood and Woman's 
Council 



'Lije' Lesson-Sermon Topic At Christian Science 



"Life" is the subject of 
Sunday's Christian Science 
Lesson-Sermon at First Church 
of Christ, Scientist, 20 Greenleaf 
St., Quincy Center. 



It is based on Moses' Ten 
Commandments [Exodus 20]; 
and includes this passage from' 
John 17:3 

"And this is life eternal, that 



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they might know Thee the only 
true God, and Jesus Christ, 
whom Thou hast sent." 

Church service and Sunday 
school are at 10 a.m. 

Death Valley has 
low point In U. S. 

The lowest point in the 
United States is located in 
Death Valley, California. 

It is 282 feet below sea level. 
-CNS 

Grimwood 

And 

Coletta 

Funeral Home 

Albert J. Coletta 

Director 

603 Adams St. 

Quincy 

773-1046 



MEMORIAL 
GIFTS 

EVERYTHING THAT IS 

WORTHWHILE & 

APPRECIATED BY 

YOUR CHURCH 

A.E.GOODHUE 

COMPANY 
VESTMENT MANUFACTURERS 

500 IN STOCK 
1163 HANCOCK ST. 
QUINCV -472 3090 




Thursday, July 18, 1974 Quincy Sun Page 13 



:2— |i f ---:zi 



Snnnt 



tl^^L 



5th ANNUAL 



• KARATE DEMONSTRATIONS 

• DISNEY CHARACTERS 

• SNAKE DEMONSTRATION 

• BAND CONCERTS 

•CHILDREN'S ZOO 

•YOUNG WORLD PERFORMERS -rr-:rr 

• FIRE ENGINE RIDES 

• BANJO BAND 

• PLENTY OF PARKING 





BUSINeSS & PROFESSIOIMAL ASSOCIAnON 



THURS. - FRI. - SAT. - 
JULY 18 - 19 - 20 

IN DOWNTOWN QUINCY 



CALENDAR OF EVENTS 




Thursday Evenin 



g ■ July *** 



-„\tr,:p:j. 



Youngs 



Banjo 



Band 



Renegades 



17:00 -,7-30| 
8:00-8:301 

16:001 
7:301 
18:301 
16:301 
17:301 
18:301 



Cottage Avenue 
Cottf^;;Xtiona»Bank 

S°"'^ S via f«e engine 
Grossman s via ,^ 

'''''^^""'TtJaUormatColmans 

S**\?.Voe National Bank 
South Shore i>- 

Grossman's 



. , , afternoon • J ^ 
Friday ^"'' „. 

^ ?> P,»tfonnfle'«!- 



Karate Exhibition 

Children s^o« 
C\ydcsdales 



,.00-2-.30l 

^,^-.45.3.001 

3 15-3-.301 

2:00-2-.45l 
\v 15 -4:001 
\'o:30- 3:301 



Friday Evening 

irP. ai 



«S National B»"t 
Platform near 8.S.^ 31 Banl^ 

P atform near S.S- ^ ^j g^nk 
Platform near S.S.^^^.^„3l Bank 

^»»*^°'"'Scolman's 

Platform ne« 's . 

^'^''^'"•IlS'nfTontofCrtyH^' 

^"U'dlotlales route 



Fire Engine R'<^«^ 
Milton Ba"** 

»-"*^.j;Sperf. 
^^MtUpoSS 



17:001 

\8:001 

\9:301 

7 to 9 

^8.001 



Hancock Bank 



FRIDAY EVENING JULY 19 
9:30 IN FRONT OF HANCOCK BANK 

MISS QUINCY BAY RACE WEEK 
BEAUTY PAGEANT 

With Baron Hugo's Orchestra 



Saturday - July 20 



Fire Engine Dcnio. 
Fire Engine Rides 
Police Ambulance 
Snake Demonstration 
Qcy. School of Ballet 
Qcy. School of Ballet 
Square Dancing 



[1:00-3:00] 

[2:301 

[1:00-3:30] 
[10:00 a.m.] 
[11:00] 
[8:00- ?p.m.] 



irkirk 



Colnian's area 




-fr-j»y»<> * - 



. • •■*...•..■.• • • ■ » . 



, ' '. • •• • 



-. .-•"••.•• 



BftflBita 



• . : . . ^. .■ • 



dMltflAi 



i^ 



P«ge 14 Quincy Sun Thursday, July 18, 1974 

Over $3,000 In Prizes 



29 To Compete For 'Miss Quincy Bay Race Week' 



Twenty-nine attractive South 
Shore girls will compete for the 
title of Miss Quincy Bay Race 
Week and more than $3,000 in 
prizes Friday night as the 
highlight of the three-day 
Quincy Sidewalk Bazaar. 

It is the largest number of 
contestants and the most prizes 
ever awarded in the pageant's 
history. 

The winner and four 
runners-up will share 
proportionately in the prizes. In 
addition, every contestant will 
receive a gift. 

The winner will also have the 
honor of reigning over Quincy 
Bay Race Week which opens 
July 31. 

The selection will be made at 
a 9:30 p.m. pageant on a 
portable boardwalk on Hancock 
St. in front of the Hancock 
Bank. 

Henry Bosworth of The 
Quincy Sun is pageant chairman. 
Kenneth P. Fallon Jr., of WJDA 
is co-chairman and will be the 
emcee. 

The new Miss Quincy Bay 
Race Week will be crowned by 
last year's winner, Patricia 
Kelley of Quincy. 

Music for the pageant will be 
provided by Baron Hugo and his 



orchestra. They will also play 
following the pageant.. 

The 29 contestants will be 
judged in evening gown and 
swimsuit competition and for 
beauty and poise. This year 
there will be 10 instead of five 
finalists and they will also be 
judged for their response to a 
question. 

The contestants will be 
escorted on stage by 
commodores of the seven QBRW 
associated yacht clubs. 

The 29 contestants are: 

•Kim Affsa, 18, 75 Lisle St., 
Braintree. 

• Mary Anderson, 16, 58 
Royal St., WoUaston. 

• Robin Bums, 16, of 21 
Chapman St., WoUaston. 

• Christine Cardinale, 19, 
1114 Liberty St., Braintree. 

• Jean Casanova, 18, of 72 
Dayton St., West Quincy. 

• Linda Champagne, 24, of 
298 Franklin St., Braintree. 

• Joanne Cirino, 16, of 95 
Assabet Rd, Merrymount. 

• Laura DiCarlo, 18, of 55 
Freeman St., North Quincy. 

• Rossana DiCenso, 18, of 29 
Viden Rd, South Quincy. 

• Lisa Furlani, 17, of 79 
Richard Rd, Braintree. 

• Joanne Gallagher, 17, of 
127 Elliot Ave., North Quincy. 



• Marianne Hackett, 19, of 
1 20 Thompson Rd, Weymouth. 

• Kristie Henriksen, 16, of 
179 Everett St., WoUaston. 

• Barbara Ann Holder, 19, of 
19 Utica St., Adams Shore. 

• Kristi Jacobson, 16, of 24 
Oak St., Braintree. 

• Elizabeth Jankins, 17, of 61 
Shelton Rd, Adams Shore. 

• Debbi King, 19, of 100 
Geraldine Lane, Braintree. 

• Janice Lamparelli, 18, of 20 
Robertson St., West Quincy. 

• Beverly Ann Lindholm, 19, 
of 211 Atlantic Ave., HuH. 

• Cynthia Maze, 18, of 303 
Water St., South Quincy. 

• Janet McConarty, 16, of 28 
Barbour Terrace, Merrymount. 

• Lauri Meyers, 20, of 2 C St., 
HuU. 

• Helen Milani, 19, of 63 Mt. 
Vernon Rd. East, Weymouth. 

• Pamela MUls, 17, of 29 
Shaw Ave., Braintree. 

• Judith Owens, 21, of 409 
Auburn St., Whitman. 

• Maria Peterson, 17, of 85 
HUl St., Weymouth. 

' Sharon RiddeU, 17, of 117 
Evergreen Ave., Braintree. 

• Laura Sorgi, 17, of 18 
Waldron Rd, Braintree. 

• Donna Marie TemuUo, 18, 
of 141 Madison Ave., Quincy, 



Here Are The Pageant Prizes 



The more than $3,000 in 
prizes to be shared by this year's 
Miss Quincy Bay Race Week and 
four runners-up include: 

• A $595 Major Modeling 
Program Scholarship from 
Barbizon School of Modeling, 
Boston. 

• Two $345 Beauty and 
Personal Development Program 
Scholarships from Barbizon 
School of Modeling. 

• A set of diamond earrings 
from Rogers Jewelry. 

• a dress ensemble from Sears 
Roebuck. 

• Five gift certificates from 
ChUd World. 

• Three gift certificates from 
Remick's of Quiiicy. 



• Two $25 savings bonds 
from Hancock Bank. 

• A ladle's tote bag from 
Jason's Luggage and Music Shop. 

• A swimsuit from Colman's. 

• A gift certificate from 
South Shore Television and 
Appliance. 

• A gift certificate from 
Cumming's. 

• A gift certificate from 
Lemer's. 

• Two tickets to the South 
Shore Music Circus, Cohasset 
from The Quincy Sun. 

• "The New World 
Encyclopedia Of Cooking" from 
The Patriot Ledger. 



• A birthday ice cream cake 
from Baskin-Robbins. 

The top winner wiU also 
receive a beautiful bouquet of 
red roses from Clifford's Flower 
Shop. 

She will wear a crown 
donated by Bottom's Up. The 
crown, a rotating prize, is to be 
worn also by future winners. It 
is now on display at Bottom's 
Up. 

The winner will get to keep a 
handsome trophy being 
presented by the Quincy Center 
Business and Professional 
Association. 



BEHEHIEB WIEH? 




For Patty Kelley 
A Year To Remember 



By MARYAIMNDUGGAN 

Patty KeUey, the striking, 
svelte, blond-haired Miss 
Quincy Bay Race Week of 
1973 win soon end her year's 
reign. 

On Saturday night, Patty, 
the model-slim, long-haired 
beauty, will relinquish her 
crown to the 1974 winner of 
the pageant. 

The memories of her year 
as Miss Quincy Bay Race 
Week evoke a smUe from 
Patty. 

"I met a lot of nice 
people," she said, "and I had 
a lot of nice experiences I 
never would have had if I 
hadn't won, I'm sure." 

During race week, Patty 
attended dinners and dances 
at Quincy's yacht clubs. She 
must have enjoyed herself 
thoroughly, for her eyes 
glistened as she grinned, 
"When I have enough money, 
I'm going to buy a yacht." 

The 19-year-old also 
addressed Quincy's Rotary 
Club, and participated in the 
Marine parade as part of her 
queenly duties. 

Patty graduated from 
Quincy High School in 1973. 
She then signed a year's 
contract with a modeling 
agency, participating in 
fashion shows throughout 
New England. She also 
worked with MGM, helping 
the studio promote the film 
"West World", starring Yul 
Brynner. 

The 19-y ear-old's list of 
experiences does not end 
there. She attended Academy 
Moderne, a modeling school 
in Boston, early in 1973. She 
also appeared on the 
Boston-filmed TV show 
Banacek that faU. 

Patty, now employed at 
the Quincy Neighborhood 
Youth Corps, decided to 
enter the Miss Quincy Bay 
Race Week Beauty Pageant 
for at least two reasons. 

"I had been to modeling 
school," she said, "and I used 
to watch TV pageants when 1 
was a little girl and always 
wanted to enter." 

Patty's list of prizes won is 
indeed long: a modeling 
scholarship, a gold trophy, a 



PATRICIA KELLEY 

Miss Quincy 
Bay Race Week 
1973 

bouquet of roses, $225 in 
bonds, a watch, a tennis suit, 
luggage, and gift certificates. 

In the fall, Patty wUl enter 
Quincy Junior CoUege as a 
pre-nursing student. Speaking 
of her yet-unknown 
successor, she said: 

"I wish her the best of luck 
and hope she enjoys her reign 
as much as I enjoyed mine." 



5 Pageant Judges 



The five judges who will select 
Miss Quincy Bay Race Week of 
1974 are: 

• Myron L. Wasserman, 
president of the Barbizon School 
of Modeling, Boston. 

• Judy Jacksina, pubUc 
relations director of the South 
Shore Music Circus, Cohasset. 

• Regina Smith of Milton, 
Miss Quincy Bay Race Week of 
1972. 



• William Munroe, president 
of the Quincy Bay Race Week 
Association. 

•Arthur Keough, professor of 
English and head of the Drama 
Department at Quincy Junior 
CoUege. 

If the pageant is rained out, it 
will be re.scheduled for 
Thursday, July 25 at 9 p.m. in 
the same location. 




SPECULS 

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471-9554 



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Fresh peppers-onions 



Thursday, July 18, 1974 Quincy Sun Page 15 



Commodores To Escort 
Miss Quincy Contestants 



Commodores in dress uniform 
will serve as escorts for the 29 
Miss Quincy Bay Race Week 
Beauty Pageant contestants 
Friday night at 9:30 p.m. in 
front of the Hancock Bank. 

The commodores are 
members of the seven yacht 
clubs which make up the Quincy 
Bay Race Week Association. 

William Munroe, past 
commodore of ihe Town River 
Yacht Club and president of the 
association, will serve as one of 
the judges at the pageant. 

Wesley Watson of the 
Wessagusett Yacht Club and 
immediate past president of the 
QBRW Association will escort 
Patricia Kelley, last year's 
winner. 

The escorts for this year's 
contestants are: 

Kenneth Lavers, past 
commodore Quincy Yacht Club 
and vice-president of the 
association; David Maloney, past 
commodore of the Town River 
Yacht Club and association 
treasurer; Edward Simpson, past 
commodore Squantum Yacht 
Club and association secretary. 

Commodore John O'Neil, 
Vice-Commodore Paul Keene 
and Rear Commodore John 
Timlin, Braintree Yacht Club. 

Commodore Mort Weiner, 
Vice Commodore Nate Sherman, 



Rear Commodore Mac Weiner, 
Metropolitan Yacht Club. 

Commodore Bernard 
McCourt, Vice Commodore 
Richard Patton and Rear 
Commodore Robert Larsen, 
Quincy Yacht Club. 

Commodore Joseph Bergamo, 
Vice Commodore Gerry Neal 
and Rear Commodore Jack 
White, Squantum Yacht Club. 

Commodore Sal Gallinaro, 
Vice Commodore Jerry Maloney 
and Rear Commodore James 
Conso, Town River Yacht Club. 

Commodore Raymond Nash, 
Vice Commodore Don 
Mathews on and Rear 
Commodore Sumner Given, 
Wessagusett Yacht Club. 

Commodore Robert 
Hutcheon, Vice Commodore 
Doug Benedict and Rear 
Commodore Len Carvitt, 
Wollaston Yacht Club. 

Other escorts will be John 
Pazyra and Bernard Reisberg, 
past commodores Metropolitan 
Yacht Club. 

Torrey Montesi, 
commodore Town River 
Club; Gordon Davis, 
commodore Squantum 
Club; Joseph Files, Edward 
Mazzachilli, Dan Richardi, past 
commodores, Braintree Yacht 
Club; Larry Belsky, fleet 
captain, Metropolitan Yacht 
Club. 



past 
Yacht 

past 
Yacht 



Pageant Committee 



Henry Bosworth of The 
Quincy Sun is chairman of the 
Miss Quincy Bay Race Week 
Pageant. 

Kenneth P. Fallon, Jr. of 
WJDA is co-chairman and will 
serve as emcee for the pageant. 
Other members of the 
committee are: 

Leslie Brieriey, Hancock 
Bank; Raymond Cunningham, 



representing the Quincy Bay 
Race Week Association, Philip 
Chase, Cummings; Remo 
DeNicola, South Shore 
Television and Appliance; Paul 
Hurley Jr., Hurley Insurance; Al 
Kelly, Sir Speedy; Florence 
Kerrigan, Baskin-Robbins; 
Cecilia Letorney, Bottom's Up; 
Roberta Meade, Roberta's 
Fashio n Shoppe and Jerry 
Morreale, Child World. 



Crown On Display 



A delicate, rhinestone-stud- 
ded, three-point crown will grace 
the head of Friday's winner of 
Miss Quincy Bay Race Week 
Beauty Pageant. 



'The silver crown has been 
donated by Cecelia LeTorney, 
co-owner of Bottom's Up on 
1420 Hancock St. It is now on 
display in the store window. 



\ 



^v-r7 ^': 



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Reg. 3 for $5.97 



CLOSING OUT 

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DEPARTMENT 

UP TO 30% 

While They Last - on Fisher, 
Garrard, Pickering, Masterworks, 
Sony and Many Others. Speakers, 
Chnagers, Component Outfits, 
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Craig 9905 Speakers, Mfg's List $12.95 



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1514 HANCOCK ST.,QUINCY 



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^SICSHOP 



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1 



Pife 16 Quincy Sun Thunday. July 18. 1974 

Calendar Of Events 



rides, 



(Cont'd from ntgel I 
•TM, 1 - 3 p.m. 

• Fire engine 
morning and afternoon. 

• Police ambulance, South 
Shore National Bank, 2:30 
p.m. 

• Snake demonstration, 
South Shore National Bank, 1 



•3:30 p.m. 

• Quincy School of Ballet, 
South Shore National Bank, 
10 a.m., Colman's area, 11 
a.m. 

* Square dancing, Gingham 
Swingers and Amie Kanash, 
front of City HaU, 8-11 p.m. 



Downtown AH Set For 
5th Annual Sidewalk Bazaar 



(Cont'd from Page 1 ) 

wesferiy side. 

The bazaar will offer 
something for everyone 
including: 

• Band concert. 



ftSSxc: 



sm 



SPECIALS 

THURS.-FRI.-SAT.-JULY 18-19-20 ONLY 



20,000 




MARBLES 



Come in and 
take a handful. 
Must be 
Accompanied 
by an adult. 



Venetian 
Blinds 

18" to 36" 
Off White 

2 FOR 
$5.00 




SET OF 3 
GARDEN TOOLS 



2 Trowels 
1 Cultivator 



MALLORY 
LANTERN 

Reg. $10.95 
NOW 




990 
$5.95 



MALLORY 
BATTERIES 



SIZE "D" 



FOR 



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1617 
HANCOCK 
ST. 

QUINCY 
479-5454 



• Banjo band. 

• Beauty pageant. 

• A zoomobile. 

• Dance performers. 

• Karate exhibition. 

• Fire, police rescue 
demonstrations. 

• Police attack dog 
demonstration. 

• The world-famed 
Qydesdales. 

• Magic acts. 

• Fire engine rides. 
Pennants of green, yellow, red 

and white will flutter high above 
Hancock St., and down below 
booths will be bursting with 
popcorn, peanuts, candy, cake, 
merchandise and exhibits. 

This year's bazaar promises to 
be educational as well as 
entertaining. There will be two 
karate exhibitions, a 
demonstration of turtles, snakes, 
frogs and lizards, an exhibition 
of police attack dogs, and a 



simulated rescue of a passenger 
pinned in an automobile. 

Children wfll squeal as 
bunnies magically appear out of 
hats and will stare wide-eyed as 
they disappear into the air. 

And chUdren of all ages • from 
1 to 92 - can enjoy the 
Children's Zoo, the temporary, 
on-wheels home of a monkey, 
skunk and boa constrictor. 

Music lovers will be able to 
sing, dance, hum and whistle to 
songs played by a banjo band, 
the Milton Band, the Renegades 
and Baron Hugo and his 
orchestra. 

On Friday evening, Patty 
Kelley, Miss Quincy Bay Race 
Week, will crown her successor 
chosen from 29 contestants 
ranging in age from 16 to 24. 
The new queen will reign during 
Quincy Bay Race Week which 
opens July 31. 

It's that time again.... 



Gingham Swingers In 
Square Dancing Exhibition 



Caller Arnie Kanash will lead 
70 Gingham Swingers in a square 
dancing exhibition in front of 
City Hall on Saturday. 

Dancing will start at 8 p.m. 
and end around 1 1 p.m. Dancers 
in the audience will be able to 
participate after the Swingers' 
performance. 



Kanash has been calling for 
the Swingers for 10 years. He is 
a past-president of the New 
England Calling Association and 
is very well-known throughout 
the New England area. 

The Gingham Swingers has an 
active membership of over 200. 
They are based in Kramer's 
Hayloft in South Weymouth. 



Young World Performers In 
Dance Shows Thursday^ Friday 



Young World Performers of 
Quincy and Weymouth will 
entertain audiences during 
Quincy's Sidewalk Bazaar. 

The group of dance students - 
with members as young as three 
years old - will perform in front 
of Child Teen Shoe Store on 



Cottage Ave. 

Two half-hour shows are 
scheduled on both Thursday and 
Friday. The first begins at 7 
p.m., the second at 8 p.m. 

They will perform solo and 
group tap dancing, modern jazz, 
ballet, acrobatics and individual 
singing. 



Karate Exhibitions Set 
For Thursday, Friday 



Karate pupils from Bay State 
School of Karate will give two 
half-hour exhibitions during 
Quincy's Sidewalk Bazaar. 

The first performance will 
begin on Thursday at 2 p.m. on 



the platform near Colman's. The 
second is scheduled for Friday at 
2 p.m. on the platform near 
South Shore National Bank. 

Bay State School of Karate is 
a division of Young World of 
Quincy and Weymouth. 



SPECIAL 
PERFORMANCES 

BY 
YOUNG WORLD 
IN FRONT OF 
CHILD TEEN 
SHOE STORE 



Performances Of 

Tap Dancing 
Solo & Groups 
Modern Jazz 
Ballet, Acrobatics 
and Singing 

^THURSDAY - FRIDAY JULY 18 - 19 
7 TO 7:30 -8:00 TO 8:30 P.M. 



YOUNG WORLD EST. 1962 



233 PARKINGWAY, QUINCY 
430 MIDDLE ST., WEYMOUTH 



6 PIECE 



WOOD CANISTER SET 



i*« 







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Four beautiful nesting wood-bin 
canisters, each with 
covirs-PLUS- matching salt and 
pepper shakers. Each piece has a 
four color design on white with 
colorful covers. A perfect way to 
store coffee, sugar, flour etc. jnd 
add a bit of charm to your 
kitchen. 



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1 402 HANCOCK STREiT 
QWNCY 77a-«340 



*> > rt A #.a''.^aV 



Thunday, July 18, 1974 Quincy Sun Page 17 



Canopied Booths To Create Festive Mood In Downtown 



Some 38 canopied booths 
representing service 
organizations and business will 
create a festive mood on 
Hancock St. during the fifth 
annual Sidewalk Bazaar. 

Concession stands will offer 
shoppers refreshments ranging 
from popcorn to peanuts to 
tonic as well as exhibits and 
information about their 
organizations. 



Participating will be: 

• Colman's. 

• Granite City Hardware [two 
booths] . 

• Mothers Qub of Houghs 
Neck, [two booths). 

• South Shore Beauty Supply. 

• Kincaides Furniture. 
•Sears. 

• St. John's Holy Name 
Society. 

• Blue Hills Council of Girl 



Scouts. 

• South Shore Television and 
Appliance. 

• Tags Sleep and Lounge 
Shop, [two booths]. 

• Donaher's Men's Shop. 

• St. John's Junior League. 

• Quincy High School Band. 

• City of Quincy. 

• Thomas Crane Library. 

• Quincy Taxpayers 
Association. 



• Jason's Music and Luggage, 
[two booths] . 

• Quincy Youth Hockey 
Association. 

• Quincy Center Business and 
Professional Association. 

• Koch Club. 

• United Commercial 
Travelers. 

• St. Boniface Church, (two 
booths] . 

• ChUd World. 



• Quincy Art Association. 

• Quincy Detoxification 
Center. 

• Big J Sub Shop. 

• Baskin Robbins. 

• Patterson's Flowers. 

• Bottom's Up. 

• Animal Betterment League. 

• W. T. Grant. 

• Survival Inc. 

• Quincy Family Planning 
Service. 



Milton, Banjo Bands To Feature Music Of Today And Yesterday 



Two area bands will entertain 
audiences at this year's Sidewalk 
Bazaar with music from today 
and from days gone by. ; 

Tonight [Thursday] a banjo 
band, under the direction of 
Buddy Burke of Weymouth, will 
perform three concerts featuring 
tunes from the Roaring Twenties 
and the Gay Nineties. 

The first performance starts at 
6 p.m. at the South Shore 
National Bank. The five-piece 
band will then board a fire 
engine which will whisk them to 
Grossman's for the 7:30 start of 
the second show. The final show 
is at 8:30 p.m. on the platform 
near Colman's. 

The band has three banjo 
players - Burke, Joseph Fahey 
and Edward O'Brien. Mike 
Tulysewski plays the trombone 
and Joe Ryan the clarin'^t. The 



group has been together for 
20-odd years. 

On Friday the tunes will turn 
to current, popular hits played 
by the Milton Band. The 
25-member band, under the 
direction of Ken Lodge, has 
been in existence for 48 years. 
Lodge has been director for five 
of those years. 

The Band will march from St. 
John's to the South Shore 
National Bank and perform 
there at 7 p.m. They will then 
march to Colman's for an 8 p.m. 
concert, march back to St. 
John's and disband. 

The two performances will 
include such favorites as "I Left 
My Heart in San Francisco", 
"The Hully Gully", and 
selections from "The Music 
Man", "Finnegan's Rainbow", 
and "Canielot". 



I « « • ■ ■ ■- 




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CHARLES 

BEAN 

MUSIC 

CO. 

1598 HANCOCK ST. 

MUSICAL 
INSTRUMENTS 

L 472-7840 



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* 3 cycle 

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SIDEWALK BAZAAR ONLY JULY 18-19-20 

Wide Range of Black & White or Color Television* Stereos 
Refrigerators • Freezers •Dishwashers • Air Conditioners 
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.•«:»T4:«> <♦:♦; 



Page 1 8 Quincy Sun Thursday , July 1 8 , 1 974 

Attack Doff, Rescue Demonstrations By Police, 



Fire D 



Quincy's Police and Fire 
Departments will conduct three 
demonstrations as a part of the 
fifth annual Sidewalk Bazaar. 

Police officers Robert Forde 
and James Buchanan will be at 
South Shore National Bank on 
Friday at 8 p.m., demonstrating 
the almost-magical, on-command 
training of two attack dogs. 

Today [Thursday] and 
Saturday, attendants will show 
and explain the equipment 
aboard the police ambulance. 
Spectators wUl be aWe to walk 
through the ambulance and 
observe pressure packs, oxygen 
valves, maternity equipment and 



line from 
to Quincy 



the 

City 



the direct 

ambulance 

Hospital. 

Today's half-hour 
demonstration begins at 2:45 
and Saturday's starts at 2:30 
p.m. 

Also on Saturday, Rescue 1 
Company of the Fu-e 
Department will demonstrate 
the use of rescue equipment on 
an automobile and will simulate 
the rescue of a passenger trapped 
in the car. The crew will then 
answer any questions from the 
audience. 

The demonstration begins at 1 
p.m. in Colman's parking area. 






Alligator^ Boa Constrictor^ 
Monkey^ Skunk Zoomobile Stars 



A skunk, monkey, alligator 
and five-foot boa constrictor will 
be the stars of the Children's 
Zoo during the fifth annual 
Quincy Sidewalk Bazaar. 

Two 4 5 - m i n u t e 
demonstrations will take place 
today (Thursday] and Friday, 
starting at 2 p.m. and at 3:15 
p.m. 

The show is an educational 
one on wheels and will be 
presented by the Boston 
Zoological Society. Experienced 



staff members will take each 
animal from its cage, allowing 
children to pet and to touch 
many of them. 

After explaining the life and 
habits of the animals, staff 
members will field questions 
from the audience. 

The Children's Zoo will be 
located on the platform near 
South Shore National Bank on 
Hancock St., Thursday and near 
Colman's on Friday. 




ALL SET FOR the fifth annual Sidewalk Bazaar sponsored by the Quincy Center Business and 
Professional Association are, from left. Jack Kerrigan, Baskin-Robbins; Ted Johnson, Granite City 
Hardware; Robert Colman, Colman's Sporting Goods; Burt Cook, Tags Sleep and Lounge Shop; Remo 
DeNicola, South Shore Television and Appliance and Police Lt. Jack Flaherty. 

[Quincy Sun Photo by Laban Whittaker] 



Fire Ensine Rides For Youngsters Renegades To Give 3 Performances 

O *^ ™„ „ ■ ^ . , TUa 1 11 _« u„. ;_ nerfnrmannft will start at 



Fire engine rides will be 
available for youngsters during 
Quincy's Sidewalk Bazaar. 

An engine has been donated 
by George Moody, and any 



donations received during the 
bazaar will be given to the Old 
Colony Demolay. They in turn 
will give the money to the 
Cerebral Palsy Clinic in Quincy. 



The Renegades, Quincy's 
Drum and Bugle Corps, will 
conduct three performances 
tonight (Thursday] in 
conjunction with the fifth 
annual Sidewalk Bazaar. 




/suiHCVao^ 



CfiJ^B^S^^ 



Thurs. Ffi. Sat. 
July 18-19-20 



SAU 



1568 



HANCOCK ST. DOWNTOWN QUINCY EASY TERMS 

These 



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Special 
Prices 
Are So 
Terrific, 

We Can'tt^ 
Reveal 

iThe Maker's] 
Name! 



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' • •• • 

■ • t ■ 

■ ■■■■■■■•. larvB 



A Luge Boston deptrtment ttoie cancelled 
dieir Older of 200 pci. and we were 
fortunate to be able to purchase dieae 
fttnous name outfits at a fantastically low 
price. Extra firm support-8 oz. ticking heavy 
density 6** thick foam mattress and box 
spring set 



KNOWN 
FOR THE 

BEDDING 
BARGAINS 

ON THE 
ENTIRE 
SOUTH 
SHORE 

SAVE ON 

* SIMMONS 

* SLUMBERLAND 

* SERTA 

* KINGKOIL 

* ETC. 

Mattresses 

Boxsprings 
Trundles 

Bunks 
Hide-A -Beds 

Studios 
Sofa Beds 

During 
Sidewalk Days 



The 112-member corps is 
directed by Edward J. Gebauer 
of Braintree. He has led the 
group since it began one and 
one-half years ago. 

The Renegades boast 43 
buglers, 19 drummers and 51 
female color guards. Their first 
performance will begin at 6:30 
p.m. in front of St. John's 
Church from where they will 
march to the platform at 
Colman's. Their next 



performance will start at 7:30 
p.m. at South Shore National 
Bank. Their final act begins at 
8:30 at Grossman's Parking area 
on Granite St. 

According to Gebauer, The 
Renegades will play a medley 
from "Jesus Christ Superstar" - 
including "I Don't Know How 
To Love Him", "The Queen's 
March", and "This Is My 
Country". They will also present 
a rifle and flag exhibition. 



Famed Clydesdales Here Friday 



The world famous Budweiser 

Clydesdales will tour the Quincy 

; area on Friday as one of the 

fifth annual Sidewalk Bazaar 

attractions. 

The team of eight horses 
draws a wagon driven by two 
uniformed men. They will 
assemble in front of City Hall at 
10:30 a.m. and tour the 
following route, making 
15-minute stops at each 
juncture: 

* Right onto Granite St. to 



St., 
to 



Grossman's parking lot. 

* Back down Granite 
right onto Hancock St. 
Remick's. 

* Right onto Cliveden St. to 
W. T. Grant and Gilchrist's, up 
through Parkingway, down 
School St. to Colman's, down 
Revere Rd to Hancock parking 
area, to South Shore National 
Bank to Bargain Center in 
Quincy Center to Mclntyre Mall 
near City Hall. 

The entire tour will take 
approximately five hours. 



Snakes, Turtles, Lizards 



Snakes, turtles, frogs and 
lizards will be the stars of the 
Massachusetts Herpetological 
Society's demonstration during 
the fifth annual Sidewalk 
Bazaar. 

Five to 10 members of the 
society will be on hand at South 



Shore National Bank from 1 - 
3:30 p.m. on Saturday. They 
will display 1 1-foot snakes and 
answer questions on a 
one-to-one basis with members 
of the audience. 

People will be able to touch 
the reptiles and amphibians 
under supervision. 

ssssss 





Demonstration: Thursday July 18, 2:00 P.M. 
in front of Colman's Sporting Goods 1630 Hancock St., Quincy 
Friday July 19 at 2:00 P.M. in front of South Shore National Bank 

233 Parkingway, Quincy 471-8837 
430 Middle St., Weymouth 

BY BAY STATE SCHOOL OF KARATE 

DIVISION OF YOUNG WORLD EST. 1962 

SSSSJ 



sssssses 




BAZAAR SPECIALS 

Lamaa $2.30 - fina SHteei 3a<^ 
Beef BittgHiHly $2.75 - CoM Pbte $2125 
Baked Stuffed Scdkipt $230 V 
CMnAitn Cacciatoie $240 ; 



PIZZA TO GO 

6 MAPLE ST., QUINCY 479-5566 



Meet the Committee 



George White of The Patriot 
Ledger is the coordinator for 
this year's Sidewalk Bazaar. 

Assisting him are John 
Murray, executive director and 
Mark Bertman of Rogers 
Jewelry, president of the 
sponsoring Quincy Center 
Business and Professional 
Association, and PhU Chase of 
Cummings, promotions 
chairman. 

The committee includes: 

Henry Bosworth, The Quincy 
Sun; Sumner Cohen, Kincaide's; 
Burt Cook, Tag's Sleep and 
Lounge Shop; Jack Cosseboom, 
Milton's; Sandra Colman,' 
QCBPA office; Remo DeNicola' 
South Shore Television and 

'Sidewalk M 



Du 



rin 



g 



The Quincy Center Bazaar 
Days, Thursday, Friday and 
Saturday, have created the 
opportunity for a new and 
different way for Mayor Walter 
J. Hannon to meet with the 
citizens cf the city. 

Hannon will have a "Sidewalk 
Mayor's office" during the 
three-day event on Hancock St. 
in front of the Hancock Bank. 
During the afternoons, he will be 
available to talk with people and 
to answer their questions. 
Members of his staff will be in 
the Mayor's "portable office" all 
day and during evening hours. 

The feature of this unique 
effort will be to "Help the 
Mayor Improve Our City". 
Citizens can write out their 
recommendations and 
suggestions for helping to make 



Appliance; Kenneth P. Fallon, 
Jr., WJDA; Jason Feldman, 
Jason's Luggage and Music Shop; 
Jack Kerrigan, Baskin-Robbins; 
David Leitch, Burgin, Platner 
Insurance; John Sperger, Sears 
Roebuck; Jerry Morreale, Child 
World; Lt. Jack Flaherty, 
Quincy Police Dept. 

In addition, the committee is 
being aided by Richard Koch, 
executive secretary of the 
Park-Recreation Board; Forestry 
Supt. John Koegler; Civil 
Defense Director Thomas Lyons, 
Public Works Director James 
Ricciuti, George Page of the 
Park Department and Edward 
Lynch of the Police Department 
sign division. 

ayor's Office' 
Bazaar 

Quincy an even more liveable 
city. Hannon will personally 
review all the suggestions. Those 
who make suggestions which can 
be most beneficial to the city 
will receive special recognition 
from the Mayor. 

"We are always looking for 
ideas from the people of Quincy 
to improve the city," said 
Hannon. "It's the suggestions 
from citizens in every area of 
Quincy which I want to know 
about. Citizen participation is 
the key to a successful city." 

Although this will be the first 
time a Quincy Mayor has 
utilized a "sidewalk mayor's 
office", Hannon said that he will 
take his new office to other 
parts of the city in the coming 
months. 



Gordon Carr Reelected 
To Girl Scout Board 



Gordon D. Carr of Quincy, a 
partner in the Erikson 
Monumental Works, was elected 
to his second term on the Board 
of Directors of the Blue Hill Girl 
Scout Council, at the council's 
recent annual meeting. 

Carr was recently appointed 
chairman of the council finance 
committee. He is a former Boy 
Scout, Scoutmaster, District 
Chairman and Executive Board 
member of the Quincy Boy 
Scouts, and is active in many 
religious, civic and fraternal 
activities, including the Quincy 
Historical Society. He has been a 
member of the Board and 
Chairman of the South Area 
Planning Division of United 



Community Services of Greater 
Boston. 

Blue Hill Council celebrated 
its 10th anniversary at the 
annual meeting, which was 
attended by over 250 girls, past 
officers, voting delegates, guests, 
and friends of Scouting. 

The meeting included the 
election of officers and members 
of the council Board of 
Directors, a review of the 
council's history, a ceremony 
welcoming graduating Senior 
Scouts into adult Scouting, 
awards for out-standing adult 
volunteers, and recognition of 
girls who have been selected to 
attend national and international 
Girl Scout events this year. 



Blinstrub's 
Old Coloiiy 

House 






760 MORRISSEY BLVD. 
DORCHESTER 282-7700 






125 $EA ST. .QUINCY 471-1623 



'30 i 



Thursday, July 18, 1974 Quincy Sun Page 19 

Baron Hugo To Play At 
Miss Quincy Race Week Pageant 



Long-time favorite Baron 
Hugo will once again provide the 
music for Friday night's Miss 
Quincy Bay Race Week Beauty 
Pageant. 

"Let Me Call You 
Sweetheart", "A Pretty Girl", 
"Four Leaf Clover", and "Ain't 
She Sweet" are among the 
old-time melodies to be played 
during the pageant. Hugo will 
also field requests from the 
audience after the pageant and 
perform other all-time favorites. 
A native of Quincy and now a 
resident of Milton, Hugo grew 
up near Brewer's Corner, West 
Quincy. He got his start in 1923 
when he played at Malmati Hall 
in South Quincy. He also played 
at the old Wisteria Bungalow - 
now the Hancock parking area - 
at Electra Hall - now Quincy 
Savings Bank - and at Taylor's 




at 



BARON HUGO 

Ballroom - now a roller skating 
rink. 

And in the heyday of the big 
band sound, Hugo's orchestra 
was the house band at the 



Totem Pole Ballroom 
Norembega Park. 

"My orchestra was the biggest 
house band in the country," 
Hugo recalls. "Musicians from 
across the country came to play 
in my band." 

Hugo shared the Totem Pole 
stage with Glenn Miller and 
Tommy Dorsey. Vahey 
Tackvorian of Dorsey's band and 
Russell Stanger, now conductor 
of Norfolk Virginia Symphony 
Orchestra, played in Hugo's 
band. 

Later in his career, Hugo 
performed at RKO Keith 
Theatre in Boston and at the 
Boston Belle boat between 
Boston and Provincetown. 

The Beauty Pageant begins at 
9:30 p.m. Friday and so does 
the sound of Baron Hugo and his 
orchestra. 



Lighting Twice As Bright For Pageant 



Thanks to Director 
Thomas Lyons and members of 
his Civil Defense unit, Hancock 
St. will be well lighted for the 
Miss Quincy Bay Race Week 
Beauty Pageant Friday night. 

There will be 6,500 watts of 



lighting hooked up to three CD 
generators. 

The lighting will be almost 
three times as bright as during 
last year's pageant. 

Included will be a 2,000-watt 
spotlight, a 1,500 watt spotlight 
and six flood lights with 3,000 



watts. 

Assisting Lyons on the scene 
will be Jorden Cohen, rescue 
chief; Ben Yuscivtch, James 
Ziniti, Thomas Joyce, Lee 
Walden, Joseph ZDanowski and 
Robert Peters. 



Two Contestants In Last Year's Pageant 



If at first you don't succeed, 
try again. 

And so Maria Peterson, 17, of 



Weymouth and Debbi King, 19, 
of Braintree are making their 
second appearance this year in 
the Miss Quincy Bay Race Week 



Pageant. 

The two competed in last 
year's pageant. 



Quincy Ballet School To Perform Saturday 



Quincy School of Ballet will 
perform two shows on Saturday 
during the Sidewalk Bazaar. 

The 10 a.m. show will be held 
at South Shore National Bank 
and the second 1 1 a.m. 
performance, m Colman's 



parking area. ' 

Mrs. Leslie Vincent is the 
director of the 50-member, 
all-female organization. Dancers 
range in age from 4 to 27 and 
hail from Quincy, Braintree and 
Weymouth. 

Listed on the dancing 



Lingoes Navy Recruit Graduate 



Navy Airman Recruit Michael 
L. Lingoes, son of Mrs. Ruth M. 
Lingoes of 53 Adams St., 
Quincy, has graduated from 
recruit training at the Naval 
Training Center, Great Lakes, 111. 

He received nine weeks of 
intensive instruction in 



seamanship, small arms training, 
fire fighting, close order drill, 
first aid and Naval history. 

He will now report to a- 
formal school for specialty 
training or to a ship or shore 
station for on-the-job-traioing. 



schedule are two jazz routines, a 
tap-dance number and a 
performance to the strains of 
"Sleeping Beauty". 

AVS DRIVE IN 
RESTAURANT 

308 Quincy Ave. - Rte. 53 
A & W Root Beer 

Fried Clams Fried Chicken 

Onion Rings French Fried 

Basket of Shrimp 

•Complete Dinners #Sandwiches 
Food Take Out Service 

Open: 5 A.M.- 11P.M. 



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AL ASSOCrATOrM 



Good Old Fashioned Savings And Fun For Everyone 



♦ Children's Zoo 

♦ Judo Exhibition 
^ Magician Act 

♦ Clydesdales 

♦ Fire Engine Rides 



^ Snake Demonstration 

* Banjo Band 

* The Renegades 
^ Square Dancing 

* Band Concert 



MISS QUINCY BAY RACE WEEK PAGEANT 
FRIDAY EVENING JULY 19th 9:30 p.m. 



Page 20 Quincy Sun Thursday, July 18, 1974 



Lydon Seeks Speed 

Crackdown In 
Wollaston, Montclair 



To reduce traffic speed and 
highway hazards in the 
Wollaston and Montclair areas of 
Quincy Councillor John J. 
Lydon Jr. has written Edward 
Pettoruto, chief supervisor of 
the Special Services for Selective 
Enforcement of the Registry of 
Motor Vehicles making several 
suggestions. 

He is asking for selected 
enforcement in setting up speed 
traps to reduce the speeding. In 
part his letter states: 

"To make you aware of this 
problem this area of the city has 
become a cross-through area to 
Boston and the State Street 
South complex from the 
[Southeast] Expressway. 

"The two streets which I 
would particularly ask you to 
concentrate , on are West 
Squantum and Beale Sts., as 
these are two of the major 
thrniighways in the city. These 
two streets have noticed an 
increase in truck traffic, 



particularly commercial, and 
these streets are also used as the 
route to the dump for refuse 
collection. 

"Trucks have been reported 
on numerous occasions to speed 
in the area with no respect to 
the community. We have also 
noted during the summertime an 
increase in notorcycle traffic 
using the Beale Street area as an 
access route to Wollaston Beach 
in coming from Boston. 

"The traffic that these two 
parallel carry is forcing some of 
the traffic to take side streets 
and is causing a severe hazard to 
the neighborhood and to the 
children. 

"I would ask for your 
recommendations in an effort to 
reduce the traffic flow and 
traffic speed in this area. In 
conjunction with your efforts I 
am requesting that both Beale 
St. and West Squantum St. be' 
posted as 30-miles an hour." 



Fenno St. Recreation Area 
Attracts Many Residents 



The Fenno Street 
Recreational Area which is 
lighted at night attracts many 
residents with its two tennis, 
two outdoor basketball, and one 
shuffleboard courts. 

The overhead lighting 
installation was completed in 
1963 at a cost of $7,000. The 
price was absorbed by the 
Merrymount Park Rental Fund 
charged to the federal 
government for a portion of the 
park used as a Nike site. 



N.O.W.: 
Getit 

from 
Colonial 
Federal. 

We've got it— 
the N.O.W. 
Account. 

It's better than a checking 
account because it pays 
interest from day of deposit to 
day of withdrawal- at 5% 
annually, compounded 
monthly. 

You can pay your bills with a 
NOW. Account by writing 
negotiable orders of 
withdrawal, making them 
payable to anyone— just like 
checks. 

Each draft you write costs only 
15 cents, and when they're 
cashed at Colonial Federal, 
they're free. 

N.O.W. For 
Experience. 

If you're 62 or older, Colonial 
Federal gives you N.O.W. For 
Experience — a free N.O.W. 
Account. 

Colonial 
.VFeckral 
if SavHigs 

And Loan Association 
of Quincy 

15 Beach Street 

Wollaston 

Tel. 471-0750 

Note: $10 must remain in 
^account to be paid inte rest^ 



The 1 1-year total cost for 
electricity was $3,303. The area 
is used day and night from the 
first of May 1o the first of 
October. The Recreation 
Department assigns a supervisor 
from 6 to 10 p.m., Monday 
through Saturday. 

The Park Department was 
responsible for installing the 
lighting facilities, purchasing and 
erecting the fence, replacement 
of broken lamps, and 
maintenance of the grounds. 




INDOOR FLAGS OUTDOOR 
ACCESSORIES 

FLAGS MADE TO ORDER 
State Flags Church Flags 

Flags of All Nations 
EAGLE FLAG CO., INC. 

147 Beach St., Wollaston, Mass. 02170 
Tel. 617-472-8242 



WOLLASTON 

Beale St. off Hancock St. 

QUINCY PR 3 1600 



WED. 7/17 THRU TUES. 7/23 

POSEIDON 
ADVENTURE 

9:10 P.M. [P.G.] 

HEARTBREAK 
KID 

7:30 P.M. [P.G.] 



ADMISSION $1.00 





PRESENT SOUVENIR FOOT^BALL - Mrs. Grace Densmore receives souvenir football at ceremony in 
her home, 28 Wollaston Ave., Wollaston. Presentation honors her late husband, Edward A. Densmore, 
Past Exalted Ruler of Quincy Lodge of Elks and a District Deputy for a decade, [left to right] Harry 
Sarfaty, first vice president of the Massachusetts Elks Association; Mrs. Densmore, Rep. Joseph E. Brett, 
Past Exalted Ruler; and John J. Gorman, Exalted Ruler. 

'No Such Thing As Unwanted Child' 
Delahunt Tells 'Pro-Life' Group 



"There is no such thing as an 
unwanted child," Representative 
William D. Delahunt told the 
Quincy chapter of the 
Massachusetts Citizens for Life, 
at a recent meeting at the home 
of Mrs. Robert Connolly, 
Mayflower Rd, Squantum. 

Delahunt stressed the 
declining population and the 
fact that the demand for 
adoptive infants has equalled the 
supply and told the group that 
he and Judge Francis Fox have 
sponsored legislation which 
would provide an incentive for 
adoption of older children. 

John Holland, chairman of 
the Quincy chapter, introduced 
the speaker to members and 
described him as the leading 
proponent of "Pro-Life" 
legislation and a member of the 
special committee on Human 



txperimentation. Holland said 
Delahunt has also been a prime 
mover behind the current bills 
on fetal experimentation 
recently passed and Maternal 
Health [H-5933]. 

According to Delahunt, 
opposition to these bills comes 
primarily from Women's Rights 
organizations which do not want 
any type of legislation. Today, 
any woman can have an abortion 
for any reason, up uiitil birth. 
Delahunt has structured his bills 
to conform to the Supreme 
Court decision of 1973, in an 
effort to avoid any questions of 
constitutionality, and to increase 
the possibility of passage and- 
signing by the Governor. 

He also stressed the need for 
the group to find out why 
women seek abortions and to 
find ways of eliminating the 



social problems which are often 
perceived as reasons. 

The Massachusetts Citizens 
for Life is a politically oriented 
group, working toward a human 
life amendment to the national 
constitution. The Quincy 
Chapter, organized last March, is 
one of approximately 74 in the 
Commonwealth. It is 
non-sectarian and is affiliated 
with the National Right to Life 
Organization, and is largely 
responsible for the support of 
current legislation by medical 
and religious leaders. 

Other officers of the group 
are: Mrs. Anne Smyth, vice 
chairman; Mrs. Joan Boland, 
treasurer; and Miss Mary 
Steinkraus, secretary. Anyone 
interested in the objectives of 
the group is welcome to become 
a member. 



Brennan Children Hold Muscular Dystrophy Carnival 



Paul and Donna Brennan, 
children of Mr. and Mrs. Paul 
Brennan, held a carnival in their 
yard at 62 Hillside. Ave., 
Wollaston. 

It was not an ordinary 
carnival with rides, cotton candy 
and balloons. It was a 



MUSIC LESS0"iJs 

Professional Instruction 
DRUM PIANO GUITAR 'i 
BRASS REEDS 

WOLLASTON MUSIC CENTER, 

27 Beale St^ Wollaston 
Call 7^3-5325 



fund-raising carnival for 
muscular dystrophy. 

Paul, a third-grader at 
Wollaston School, and Donna, a 
sixth-grader there, raised $25. 
They were assisted by their 
cousin Joanne, a tnird-grader at 
Mass. Fields School. 

The day's activities included 
games-playing with prizes and a 



cake and rummage sale. The 
youngsters had been collecting 
items for the rummage sale 
door-to-door since the winter. 

Paul and Donna planned the 
carnival entirely on their own 
and had quite a successful day 
entirely devoted to the cause of 
muscular dystrophy. 



Arthur Yacobian Accepted 
At AeroiTiautics School 



WOLLASTON 
CREDIT UNION 

PERSONAL & AUTO LOANS 
NO NOTICE SAVINGS ACCTS. 
EARN 572% PER ANNUM 



SPECIAL 
NOTICE 



6% 



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HOME IMPROVE.MENTS 

.M.I. ACCOUNTS FULLY INSURED 
UNDER LAW BY MASS.C.U. 
SHARE INSURANCE CORP. 



651 HANCOCK ST., 

WOLLASTON 

773-3500 773-8600 

OPEN MON. THURS. 98 TUES., WED., FRI. 9-5 



The School of Aeronautics, 
Florida Institute of Technology, 
announces that Arthur S. 
Yacobian of 359 Beale St., 
Wollaston, has been accepted for 
aviation training beginning this 



^^^^^0*0t0^0^0^0t0^^^^ ^ . 



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The university offers 
academic programs and/or flying 
in preparation for a career in 
aviation. 

NEWSBOYS WANTED 
Here's a chance to earn extra 




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SOUTH SHOBE 
SEWING MACHINE CO. 

, We Service All Make% Sewing 

Machines Arid Vacuturi (Qi^n^rg 

666 A Halttoek 'St., WolMnn 



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Thursday, July 18, 1974 Quincy Sun Page 21 



I Along The Campaign Trail 

Mary Collins Cites 

Campaign Issues 

At WoUaston Meeting 



Papile Opposes MBTA Station 



Mrs. Mary P. Collins of 116 
Lansdowne St., Squantum, has 
announced her candidacy for the 
Democratic nomination for 
State Representative in the 
Third Norfolk District. 

The new legislative district is 
composed of three precincts in 
WoUaston and one precinct in 
Montclair. Mrs. Collins made her 
announcement at a meeting of a 
group of supporters at the home 
of Mr. and Mrs. Edward Spring, 
107 Waterston Ave., WoUaston. 

Mrs. Collins, 3 1 , is a graduate 
of Msgr. Ryan Memorial High 
School in Boston and the Boston 
School of Business Education. 
She is an active member of the 
WoUaston . Woman's Qub 
Juniors; vice president of the 
Squantum School Parent 
Teacher oiganization; chairman 
of the Parents Advisory Council 
to the School Food Service; 
treasurer of the Social Service 
Committee of the Quincy City 
Hospital; a member of the 
League of Women Voters, FISH; 

Bellotti Files 

Over 30,000 

Names 

Former Lt. Gov. Francis X. 
Bellotti of Quincy, Democratic 
candidate for Attorney General 
filed more than 30,000 certified 
signatures to place his name on 
the Sept. 10 Democratic primary 
ballot. 

Bellotti, a trial lawyer filed 
the signatures in the elections 
division of the Secretary of 



State's Office, 
Massachusetts. 

State law requires 
certified signatures, 
exceeded that amount 
20,000 signatures, 
total more than 



Boston, 

10,000 
Bellotti 
by over 
making his 
twice the 
number filed by other 
candidates for Attorney General. 

Raymond Crombie 

Elected To 

Society Of Notaries 

Raymond D. Crombie of 100 
Washington St., Quincy, has 
been elected to membership in 
the American Society of 
Notaries, a nonprofit 
organization of persons who 
hold the office of Notary Public. 

Crombie is Administrative 
Assistant/Constable for the City 
of Quincy in the District Court 
of East Norfolk, Norfolk 
County. 



NEWSBOYS WANTED 
Here's a chance to earn extra 

money by building a Quincy 
Sun home delivery route. 
Telephone: 471-3100 



THE PRICE 
IS UP ON 

SCRAP 

Copper, Brass, Cast Iron 
and Steel 

POM 

The Name in Scrap 
on The South Shore 

175 Intervale St., Quincy 

FormerlY Haynts Scrap Yard 

472-9251 



the Quincy Citizens' 
Association; and is on the 
Steering Committee of the 
recently formed Squantum 
Community Association. 

She has been involved in 4-H 
work in the city and has taken 
part in fund raising for the 
Kidney Foundation and the 
American Cancer Society. 

Citing some of the issues of 
her campaign Mrs. Collins 
proposed stricter controls for 
the Prison Furlough program 
and on campaign spending; 
economy in government; and 
solutions to juvenile and drug 
programs. 

She said she would be a 
representative who would listen 
to her constituents and represent 
the interests of all 
neighborhoods in the district. 

Married to Thomas L. Collins 
Jr., an employee of the New 
England Telephone Company, 
she is the mother of four, 
Christine, Caroline, Deidre and 
Timothy. 



A coffee party in honor of 
James P. Papile, candidate for 
state representative from the 
First Norfolk District, was held 
recently at the home of Mr. and 
Mrs. Pat DiStefano of 38 Payne 
St., South Quincy. 

Papile spoke on an issue he 
said was one of the foremost 
facing residents of the area and 
residents of the entire city-the 
proposed new MBTA station. 

Papile said the rapid transit 
terminal in Braintree would cost 
far less than the site in South 
Quincy "where landtakings, tax 
revenue losses to the city of 



Quincy from business 
establishments forced to 
relocate, the building of on and 
off ramps to the m^or abutting 
highways, and probable 
destruction of wetlands were all 
necessary for it's construction in 
South Quincy." 

"It is inconceivable that an 
issue such as this which has been 
thoroughly, and intelligently 
decided by both Braintree and 
South Quincy residents could be 
allowed to smoulder and not 
brought to an end for the 
people," Papile said. "A 
common sense end excluding 



private big business interests, a 
common sense end without the 
use of another citizen's petition 
circulating through the district 
once again." 

Papile also stressed the need 
for a representative without 
political ties or political 
obligations to speak out and 
take action on issues such as the 
MBTA station. 

Papile also explained his 
position will be that of a 
full-time representative. He said 
he notified his employer months 
ago that if elected he will leave 
their employ. 



Elect Qualified Candidates, Williams Urges 



A coffee hour was held 
recently at the house of Mr. and 
Mrs. Paul Johnson of 161 
Sumner St., Quincy Point for 
Thomas F. Williams, candidate 
for state representative from the 
First Norfolk District. 

Williams told the 25 in 
attendance "now is the time for 
concerned citizens to speak out 



and get involved in local and 
state politics." 

He stressed the importance of 
electing qualified, independent 
people who are not afraid to 
speak out and stand alone on 
political issues. 

Williams also discussed the 
following issues; the sea shore; 
the Fore River Bridge; the Fore 



River Shipyard; and the Edison 
Plant. He stressed the need for a 
balancing of economic 
improvement as well as 
environmental control. 

He pledged that if elected he 
would use his background in 
law, finance, real estate, and 
civic involvement to the best 
interest of the district. 



Bike Rodeo Friday At 6 Locations 

>deo wiU be helH The rodeo will be held at including Balance Test; Riding 

Montclair School, 9:45 a.m., *>-- -^^ • • • - • - ' '""'* 
Snug Harbor, PoUard, and Shea 
rink, 1:30 p.m., WoUaston and 
Merrymount, 2 p.m. 

The rodeo will consist of five 
events to test bike riding skill 



A Bike Rodeo will be held 
Friday at six locations in the 
city for contestants between the 

ages of 8 and 12 years old 
announces Recreation Director 
William F. Ryan. 



the Straight Line Test; Maneuver 
and Change Balance Test; Short 

Radius Turn Test; and Quick 
Direction Change Test. Prizes 
will be awarded the winners. 






WOLUSTON 



Bank-Dine-Shop-Save 



Whatever your shopping 
needs the WoUaston area 
has a lot to offer. The 
Shopping Center is 



conveniently located at 
the comers of Hancock, 
Beach and Beale Streets. 
The stores listed on this 



page offer a wide variety 
of services and 
merchandise from 
Cameras, Insurance, Hair 



ALLAN'S TAPE & STEREO CTR. 

16 Beale St. 472-9698 
Open Daily 10 to 9 
Sat. Till 6 
ANDREA'S GIFT SHOPPE 

19A Beale St. 472-9697 
Open Mon. thru Sat. 9:30 to 5 
Arlyne Bearse and Grace Lutsky 

ARLENE'S BAKERY 

9 Beale St. 472-4025 . 
XOaily Bakery Specials 
\2 Large 1% lb. Loaves of Bread .99(f 

BARRY'S DELICATESSEN 

21 Beale St. 472-3322 
Open Till 6:30 Daily 

BEACON CLEANSERS 

624 Hancock St. 773-7400 
Open 7 A.M. to 6 P.M. 
CARITA COIFFEURS 
29 A Beale St. 471-6611 
Open 5 Days, Thurs. & Fri. Till 9 

COLONIAL FEDERAL SAVINGS 
AND LOAN ASSOCIATION 

15 Beach St. 471-0750 
8 to 6 Weekdays, 8 to 7:30 Thursdays 
COTTAGE PAINT & WALLPAPER 

652 Hancock St. 479-7169 

Open 9 to 5:30 - Thurs. <t Fri. Till 9 



"Protection That Never Sleeps" 
g^RRY INSURANCE AGENCY INC. 

General Insurance 

Brokers 

All Types Of Insurance 

671 HANCOCK ST., QUINCY 479-5500 



Styling, Music. 
Restaurants, Home 
Decorating and 
Remodeling, Cards and 
Gifts. 

NOBLE'S CAME R A SHOP 

680 Hancock St. 773-6077 
Open 9:30 to 6 Daily, Fri. Till 8 

PURITY SUPREME 

615 Hancock St. 
Open Every Evening 

RAFAELA COIFFEURS 

672 Hancock St. 472-9229 
Open Thurs. 9 to 9 - Daily 9 to 6 
Closed Mondays 

SCHULTZ, DOYLE & STODDARD INC. 

624 Hancock St. 472-4800 

SOUTH SHORE NATIONAL BANK 

Clay & Chapman Sts. 471-0361 
Open Friday Till 7:30 

WOLLASTON CREDIT UNION 

651 Hancock St. 773-3500 
Open Mon. & Thurs. Till 8 

WOLLASTON DONUT SHOPPE 

17 Beale St. 479-1806 
Open 6 to 6 Daily 

WOLLASTON MUSIC and HOBBY SHOP 

27 Beale St. 773-5325 

Open Daily Till 5:30, Mon. & Tues. Till 8 

Officers and Directors of the WoUaston Business 

and Professional Association 
President: Irving Boyes - Schultz, Doyle 8( Stoddard Inc. 

Sec'y-Treas: Bern ice R. King - N. J. Riggs 8< Son 

Recording Sec'y: E. Sarto Minihan - Ret. - Affial. So. Shore Nat'! Bank 
Directors: Daniel R. Barry - Barry's Deli 

Henry G. Berry - Berry's Ins. Agcy Inc. 

Frank Crotty - General Business Services 

A. L. Hallberg - Purity Supreme 

Jack Lydon - Lydon-Russell Funeral Home 

Elden Meady - Harmon Plumbing 

Ronald Neilsen - South Shore National Bank 

Harold Bobbins - Bobbins Garage 



FRANK EVANS CO. INC. 

343 Newport Ave. 479-1014 
Open 8 to 5 Daily 

GRANITE 5^ TO $1.00 

7 Beale St. 

Frank & Bob Braga 

Open 9:30 to 5:30 Fri. Till 8 

GREETING CARD SHOP 

15 Beale St. 472-1987 
Open 9:30 to 5:30 

HANCOCK BANK 8( TRUST CO. 

20 Beale St. 773-0500 

Open Thurs. 6 to 8 ■ Lobby 9 to 3 

Drive-Up 8:30 to 4:30 Daily 

HAPPY CHEF 

661 Hancock St. 472-9444 
Open Every Evening 

KEY TO ELEGANCE 

831 Hancock St. 471-2323 

Open 9:30 to 9 Fridays 

9:30 to 5 Daily, Except Friday 
LINCOLN PHARMACY 

716 Hancock St. 472-4246 

A. R. Murphy Jr., Reg. Pharm. 

Open Daily 8 to 9 Sun. 8 to 6 
MUG'N-MUFFIN 

31 Beale St. 472-9641 

Open 7 A.M. to Midnite 



Page 22 Quiney $un Thursday , July 18, 1974 



Lydori Asks Montclair 
Park Improvements 



In a letter to Richard J. Koch, 
executive secretary of the Park 
and Recreation Board Councillor 
John J. Lydon Jr., has asked for 
a survey of Montclair Park with 
a view to upgrade the facilities. 

Lydon points out that 
Montclair Park is the only major 
recreation facility serving 
approximately 10,000 people in 
the northern end of the city. He 
cites the fact that the park is in 
need of a face lifting and 
refurbishing. 

He recommends an additional 
tennis court as many times the 
present courts are crowded with 
residents waiting up to an hour 
to get court time. He notes that 
the cost can be decreased as 
hghting can be provided through 
cooperation with the 



Massachusetts Electric Company 
in projecting ligliting from the 
street lamps to light the tennis 
court. 

Lydon recommends that to 
put in the additional tennis 
court it will be necessary to 
reverse the basketball court 
badly in need of resurfacing and 
repainting of the backboards. 

Other recommendations 
include destruction of the small 
concrete bleachers which have 
become a bottle smashing target 
and replacing them with new 
bleachers; refurbish the 
perimeter fence of the park; and 
provide additional sand for the 
tot lot and increase the 
scheduled cleanup of the park 
area through the summer 
months. 



Frances Osborne School 
Pupils Present 'Dance Revue^ 



The pupils of The Frances 

Osborne School of Dancing 

recently presented "Dance 

Revue" at Atlantic Junior High 

School, North Quincy. 

Those participating were: 

Lynne Anderson, Laureen 

Barba, JoAnne Barone, Nancy 

Barrett, Peggy Behenna, Doreen 

Berio, Patricia Berio, Stacy 

Berio, Christine Carnes, Lisa 

Cattaneo, Karen Chiavaroh, Kara 

Collins, Kerry Collins, Tracey 

Cook, Joyce DeCelle, Mary 

DeCelle, Diane DeLuca, Daniella 

Demio, Jayne DiPasqua, Darline 

Derbes, Lisa DiSantis, Andrea 

Dunn, Lisa Earle, Rosemary 

Egan, Kristin Ferris, Robin 

Ford, Donna Gagne, Kathy 

Gagne, Laurie Gagne, Wendy 

Gerome, Sara Marie Gregory. 

Francine Jancaterino, Kari 
Jancaterino, Lisa Johnson,' 
Sandra Johnson, Mary Kenney, 
Diane Kimball, Karen Kimball, 
Heidi Koster, Jennifer Koster, 



Wendy LePine, Robyn Linehan, 
Brenda Lucier, Jeanne Mahan, 
Jennifer Mahan, Colleen Martin, 
Carol Maver, Alicia Palmieri, 
Kimberly Ryan, Sharon Smyth, 
Jacquehne Stevens, Toni 
Svizzero, Andrea Trifone, Maria 
Trifone, Alyse Zaccheo, Lauren 
Zaccheo, Shannon Molloy, Anita 
Silverstein, Linda DeBenedetto, 
Pat Diamond, Janet Powers, 
Karen Jenkins, Pat O'Toole, 
Susan Sweeney. 

Awards for perfect attendance 
were presented. 

One Year - Stacy Berio, 
Christine Games, Joyce DeCelle, 
Darline Derbes, Lisa Earle, 
Rosemary Egan, Robin Ford, 
Sara Marie Gregory, Lisa 
Johnson, Diane Kimball, Wendy 
LePine, Robyn Linehan, Brenda 
Lucier, Carol Maver. 

Two Year - Daniella Demeo,». 
Francine Jancaterino, Karen 
Kimball, Jennifer Koster, Heidi 
Koster. 



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BERMUDA BOUND - Mr. and Mrs. Walter Lane of 31 Binnacle Lane, Germantown are the grand prize 
winners of a one-week expense-paid trip to Bermuda won In conjunction with the June opening of the 
new Granite Co-operative Bank headquarters in North Quincy. Miss Regina Young, head teller at the 
bank, presents the Lanes with their plane tickets and reservations. 

[Quincy Sun Photo by Laban Whittaker] 

Squantum Community Assn. 
Elects Officers, Accepts By-Laws 



The newly-formed Squantum 
Community Association [SCA] 
pledges to "establish a forum for 
free and open discussion" of 



niisterSUB 

64 Billings Rd 
North Quincy 479-9685 

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Joseph Buccini 
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problems unique to the 
community. 

The by-laws of the association 
also promise to promote 
"unity. ..respect for the law. ..and 
respect for individuals' rights to 
peace and privacy." 

The 84 persons attending the 
meeting elected Robert Murray 
of Landsdown St. as president. 
Daniel Coughlin of East 
Squantum St. is vice-president, 
Hugo Mujica of Landsdowne St., 
treasurer and Martha Regan of 



Dorchester St., secretary. 

Nine committees were 
established at this meeting of the 
association: environmental, 
finance, legislative, membership, 
nominating. planning and 
research, pubUcity, social, and 
youth activities. 

The SCA invites all members 
of the community to attend the 
next meeting on Monday, Aug. 
12 at the First Church", »tS4 
Bellvue Rd at 8 p.m. 



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Thuriday.iuly 18, 1974 Quincy Sun Pafc 23 



Winners Of Koch Club 
Family Picnic Listed 



Despite a sizzling~9S degree 
temperature the Koch Qub 
Family Picnic held at the 
Pageant Field, Merrymount Park 
last Sunday was a big success 
with more than 500 parents and 
children taking part in the 
variety of contests and games. 

Winners in the various events 
included: 

Home Run Contest, 5-6 years, 
Edward Flynn, boys; 7-8 years, 
Tim Sullivan, boys, Debbie 
Mosher, girls; 9-10 years, Kevin 
McSweeney, boys; Susan 
McLoughlin, girls; 11-12 years, 
Mike McSweeney, boys, Peggy 
Carmody, girls; 13-14 years, 
John Cravins, boys, Margaret 
Shea, girls. 

In the Basketball Shooting 
Contest the winners were: 7-9 
years, Larry Costello, boys and 
Sheila Kiley, 'girls; 10-12 years. 
Mile McSweeney, boys and 
Kathy Carmody, girls; and 13-14 
years, Joanne Ruane, girls. 

The Koch Club Young men's 



Softball team defeated the boys' 
baseball league team in which 
coaches and parents participated 
11-3. In the Egg Throwing 
contest there were 45 couples 
entered with Gary and Betty 
McSweeney adjudged the 
winners. 

In the races the winners were: 
1 and 2 toddlers, Betty Ann 
McSweeney; 3 and 4 toddlers, 
Kerry Shurtleff; 5 and 6 cadet 
division, Kathy O'Sullivan; 7 and 
8 division, Jim Milano and 
Nancy Radigan; 9 and 10 
division, Fran McEachern and 
Susan McLoughlin; 11 and 12 
division, Mike McSweeney and 
Susan Radigan; 13 and 14 
division, Tom McKenna and 
Rosemary Croke. 

In the longest softball 
throwing contest the winners 
were: 7 and 8 division, Nancy 
Radigan; 9 and 10 division, Kim 
Sheets; 11 and 12 division, 
Susan Radigan; and 13 and 14 
division, Joanne Ruane. 



Theodore Turowski 
Ends Active Duty 



Navy Aviation Structural 
Mechanic Second Class 
Theodore N. Turowski, son of 
Mr. and Mrs. John J. Turowski, 
Jr. of 125 Edgewater Drive, 
Houghs Neck, completed two 
weeks of annual active duty for 
training with Intermediate 



Maintenance Support Unit 
23Z-I at the Naval Air Station, 
North Island, Calif. 

Turowski drills one weekend a 
month with the unit at the Naval 
Air Reserve Station, South 
Weymouth. 



David Califano Deployed To Middle East 



Navy Seaman David E. 
Califano, son of Mr. and Mrs. 
Mike Califano of 101 Taffrail 
Rd., Germantown, is deployed 
to the Middle East aboard the 
destroyer USS MuUinnix. 



He and his fellow crew 
members were commended for 
providing assistance to a disabled 
French ship off the east coast of 
Africa. 



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Mayor Walter J. Hannon, in 
conjunction with the Quincy 
Housing Authority Board of 
Commissioners and Chairman 
Lawrence S. Butler, have applied 
to the Department of 
Community Affairs for 200 
units of low-rent housing for 
senior citizens in Quincy. 

The Department of 
Community Affairs has recently 
received authorization from the 
Massachusetts Legislature 
sufficient to finance an 
additional 4,000 units of 
housing for the elderly and has 



Hannon Seeks 200-Units 
In W. Quincy For Seniors 



invited municipalities to submit 
pre-application forms. 

Mayor Hannon said he hopes 
to pin DCA approval for 
construction of the 200 units 
and would like to see them built 
in West Quincy. 

"Units constructed in this 
area would balance the senior 
citizen population within the 
city," he said. "In talking with 
our elderly citizens, 1 have 
learned that the majority do not 
want to leave the area in which 
they have lived for a number of 
years." 



The Quincy Housing 
Authority is presently 
completing pre-application 
procedures which are required 
by the DCA to ensure that new 
state-aided housing 
developments involving new 
construction are related to 
overall community plans. 

They are working with 
Hannon and are enlisting the 
participation and review of local 
boards and agencies interested in 
housing and development within 
the city. 



Major Harold Goodman Graduates A.F. School 



Major (Dr.) Harold F. 
Goodman, whose wife, Rona, is 
the daughter of Dr. and Mrs. 
Joseph Wassersug of 44 
Highfield Road, Merrymount, 
has graduated from the U.S. Air 
Force School of Aerospace 
Medicine at Brooks, AFB, Tex. 

During the nine-week course. 
Major Goodman received 
instruction in specialized 
aerospace medical subjects and 
administrative procedures of the 
USAF medical service. 

The* major is being assigned to 
Ellsworth AFB, S.D., for duty as 
a flight medical officer. 

Major Goodman received his 



A.B. degree in 1964 from degree in 1968 from New York 
Harvard University and his M.D. University. 



Prasanta K. Mitra, M.D. 

announces the opening of his 
Office for the Practice of 

Urology and Sterility 

of 67 Coddington St., Quincy 
Beginning July 1, 1974 

Hours by appointment Phone 773-2677 



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343 NEWPORT AVENUE • WOLLASTON 

479-1014 



Member South Shore 
Chamber of Commerce 



Page 24 Quincy Sun Thursday, July 18, 1974 

John Concannon Member New 
Criminal Justice Training Council 



John P. Concannon, Norfolk 
County Clerk of the Courts, 
Norfolk County, was among 
those sworn into office as a 
member of the new Criminal 
Justice Training Council. 

The oath was administered by 
Governor Sargent in ceremonies 



at the State House. 

The new council will be 
responsible for providing 
increased training for law 
enforcement personnel and will 
have at its disposal $2 to $4 
millioii dollars annually for this 
purpose. 




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The new funds are being 
raised through a 25 per cent 
increase in the fines which 
convicted criminals pay. 
Governor Sargent pointed out 
that "more criminals are getting 
away with more crime" because 
the state has failed to provide 
the best possible training for its 
law enforcement officers. 

Physicians receive 11,000 
hours of training, lawyers 9,000 
hours of training, hair dressers 
400 hours of training and "yet 
we settle for only 320 hours of 
training for the officer on the 
beat," Sargent said. He 
maintained that the council's 
task is to reverse the percent 
situation with the new funds 
available. 



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HOLLYWOOD HOTLINE 

Angle's costar 
is Earl Holliman 



By NANCY ANDERSON 
Copley News Service 

HOLLYWOOD - Earl 
Holliman will be Angle 
Dickinson's costar in "Police 
Woman," Columbia Pictures 
Television's new series for 
NBC-TV to premier in the fall. 
He'll play an undercover of- 
ficer in the criminal con- 
spiracy division of a big city 

police department John 

Davidson will host "The 
Hollywood Paladium," a Cos- 
sette-Pasetta television 
special, to air Sept. 6 over 
NBC-TV. The hour-long show 
will be a pilot for a weekly 
series. I^et the network know 
how you like it. ... An interna- 
tional team of disaster ex- 
perts followed a visit to the 
site of the 1971 Sylmar, Calif., 
quake with a visit to Univer- 
sal Studios to see scenes from 
"Earthquake," a scary fea- 
ture film to be released in 
November. The specialists in 
natural disaster response 
techniques represented 23 
countries, so the movie sound 
track must have been a mys- 
tery to some of them. Or is 
Universal dubbing in 23 lan- 
guages? The group was ac- 
companied by Karl Mahler, 
chief of the Division of 
Foreign Disaster Prepared- 
ness of the U. S. Department 
of State. For a study of real 
disasters, they should have 
seen clips from a few other 
disasters I could name: 

"Gatsby," for instance 

Bill Bixby and wife Brenda 
Benel expect their first child 
by Thanksgiving, 

-I- + + 

Barbara Seagull says she 
gives interviews but doesn't 
read them, because she's got- 
ten so little understanding 
from the press. 

Frankly, I don't approve of 
Barbara's life-style, since she 
and David Carradine hve to- 
gether in unmarried bliss and 
are parents of a charming, 22- 
month-old child named Free. 
But I don't quarrel with it, 
since, up to a point, what Bar- 
bara does is Barbara's busi- 
ness. 

However, I did quarrel with 
her the other day about the 



fact that she doesn't take Free 
to a pediatrician for checkups 
nor has she had him im- 
munized against various 
dread diseases. 

"You can see he's healthy," 
Barbara said, which did seem 
to be the case. Free still 
nurses and will continue to do 
so until he more or less weans 
himself, his mother said, 
while the rest of his diet has 
been developed through 
natural selection. 

"I've added things to his 
diet as he's wanted them," 
Barbara said. "Experiments 
have shown that, if you put 
various kinds of foods on a 
table and let children choose 
whatever they want, they'll 
select what's best for them." 

Free made his movie debut 
in the prenatal state in a soon- 
to-be-released Dutch film 
called "Love Comes Quietly," 
which starred his mother 
when she was 6 months preg- 
nant. 

"I'd been in correspondence 
with Nikolai Van Der Heyde, 
the director, when I became 
pregnant," Barbara relates, 
"because I just couldn't stand 
to wait any longer to have a 
baby. So I wrote him that I 
was pregnant and wouldn't 
blame him if he replaced me 
with another actress. 

"But he wrote back that he 
still wanted me in the picture. 
About my pregnancy, he said, 
'It's a gift from God.'" 

The film was made in Fries- 
land during its coldest sum- 
mer in 125 years. 

Barbara shivers when she 
remembers, "We had to walk 
under fire hoses." 

+ + + 

Commendations are due 
Roy Clark for presenting a 
show at the Frontier in Las 
Vegas which is not only enter- 
taining but suitable for family 
trade. 

Instead of following a typi- 
cal Vegas comic with a store 
of dirty jokes in the manner of 
most show-room headliners, 
Roy is the only comedian on 
the bill anfl, while some of his 
jokes have double meaning, 
they are neither bright blue 
nor offensive. Best of all, they 
go over the heads of the kids. 




Bring in this Coupon Ad to register for 

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Thursday, July 18, 1974 Quincy Sun Page 25 



TENNIS TROPHIES - Mrs. Carmine G. D'OlimpIo of Quincy [left! presents some mementos of her late 
father, international tennis star Willard F. Crocker, to the Quincy Historical Society. Crocker, a 1915 
graduate of Quincy High School who moved to Montreal to win 12 Canadian tennis titles in the 1920's, 
was recently elected to the Canadian Tennis Hall of Fame. Accepting the trophies is H. Hobard Holly! 
president of the Quincy Historical Society, while Mrs. William A. White Jr., president of the Quincy 
Tennis Club, looks on. 

Over 200 Take Part 
In Quincy Track Club Meet 



Some of the girls on the 
Quincy Track Club may be 
playing Junior League baseball 
in another year. 

During a QTC practice last 
week at Veterans Memorial 
Stadium, a man with a baseball 
and glove was watching the 
workout. 

When asked if he had a son or 
daughter on the club, he 
answered, "No, I am a Junior 
League manager scouting some 
of your girls. The way they can 
run and hurdle, they should be 
very good chasing fly balls." 

Lou Tozzi, North Quincy 
Track coach and QTC secretary, 
who directs the club's weekly 
meets at the stadium, said, 
"They would get there as quick 
if not quicker than a lot of boys, 
if you can lure them away from 
track." 

The Track Club is seeking the 
help of more fathers and are also 
looking for girls 15 and older 
and men 30 and older. The club 
is still hoping to hold a masters 
mile for men 40 and older. "The 
club is open to all Quincy 
residents aged nine to 90," Tozzi 
said. 

More than 200 took pan in 
last week's second weekly meet 
and at least as many are 
expected to participate on 
tonight's [Thursday] meet at 6 
o'clock at the stadium. 

Among the top performers 

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won the men's open 100-yard 
dash in 10.1 seconds; Andy 
Levitsky, who won the 9-11 
boys long jump with a leap of 
1 1-7'/2, and Janice Kelly, winner 
of the 12-15 girls' 220-yard dash 
in 28.4 seconds. 

Other winners: High jump 
Dan McGillicuddy, boys' 9-11 
Steve Doherty, boys' 12-15 
Laurie Smith, girls' 12-15, and 
Dave DiBona, men's open. 

Long jump, Laurie Petkun, 
girls' 9-11. 

Shot put, Dan Colby, boys 
12-15; Paul Doherty, men's 
open. 

100-yard dash, Nancy 
McCarthy, girls 12-15; BUly 
McKeon, boys 9-11. 

Mile, Tex Varrasso, men's 
open. 

Half-mile, Marty Levenson, 
boys' 12-15; Dotty Irvine, girls 
12-15. 

220-yard, dash, Phil Strungis, 
boys 12-15. 

440-yard run. Chuck Rose, 
boys 9-11; Joe DiRico, men's 
open. 

Low hurdles. Dean Zoia, boys 
9-11; Gail Clougherful, girls 
9-11; Dan Mclntyre, boys 12-15; 
Paula Church, girls 12-15. 



High hurdles, Geoff 
Hennessey, men's open. 

Relays, Bruce Brennan, Bob 
Biagini, Mark Robinson and Dan 
Mclntyre, boys 12-15; Lee 
Watkins, Paul Doherty, Paul 
O'Donnell and Phil Robinson, 
men's open; Dave Church, Jack 
Brown, Mike Gardiner and Andy 
Levitsy, boys 9-11; Paula 
Church, Dotty Irvine, Laurie 
Smith and Janice Kelly, girls 
12-15. 

An added feature which 
provided much fun and action 
was a relay race between four 
girls and two weightmen. The 
girls ran 100 yards each and the 
boys 200 yards each. The first 
two girls took a good lead over 
weightman Karl Knudsen but 
Paul Doherty, a fine sprinter as 
well as a weightman, picked up 
much ground on the third girl 
and just barely missed 
overtaking the girls' anchorman, 
Janice Kelly, who won by 
inches. The other girls were 
Laurie Smith, Ann Sullivan and 
Dotty Irvine Tonight there will 
be several relay races with two 
boys and two girls on each team, 
which should provide more 
action. 

"TOM SULLIVAN 







Sports Section 



•Babe Ruth League 

Police Clincti Title 



In the Babe Ruth League the 
Quincy Police nine clinched the 
Division championship Sunday 
with a record of 17 wins and 4 
losses. They have four games left 
on the busy schedule. 

The Police easily defeated 
Bersani Brothers, 10-4. Winning 
pitcher was Louie Fishman who 
also banged out three hits to 
help his own cause. Rich Boyle 
had 2 hits. Ed Laracy, Mike 
Murphy and Chuck LoPresti 
each contributed singles. 

The Police rolled 17-2 over 
the Quincy Firemen's team with 
LoPresti pitching. Brian 
Connolly had two hits including 
a grand slam homer; Ronny 
Donovan had two hits including 
a triple; LoPresti got two hits 
including a double; and Fishman 
also had two hits. 

The Granite City nine won 
7-5 over Gino's with Bob Stack 
pitching. Stack only allowed six 
scattered hits and had two hits. 
Dave Raftery hit a single and a 
double and Dave Cramond hit a 
double. 



Granite City ' won 6-1 over 
Bersani Brothers with Dave 
Cramond hurling a one-hitter. 
For the winners Dave Raftery 
had two hits, a single and a 
triple. Both Steve Doyle and 
Bob Stack got two hits apiece. 

In the game with the Sons of 
Italy nine Granite City was the 
winner, 5-1. Dave Raftery 
pitched a 4-hitter striking out 7 
batters and contributing a 
double. Carl Bergstrom and Bob 
Stack hit for 2 bases. 

Bryan Post defeated Quincy 
Elks, 6-2, with Mike Litif 
pitching. Frank Sayers hit a 
homer. Harry Donahue aided the 
victory by playing fine defensive 
ball. 

Bersani Brothers defeated the 
Bryan Post 4-3 with Lenny 
Pecot pitching. Dave Peters got 
two hits. In the game with 
Houghs Neck Bersani Brothers 
won 3-1. Mark Buchanan 
pitched. Steve Janick came 
through with the game winning 
triple. For Houghs Neck Steve 
Bell led with two hits. 



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Pa|c 26 Quincy Sun Thunday.July 18. 1974 



Quincy Softball 

Sabina's Wins Pair 
in Bid For Playoff Spot 



Sabina's won two games 
during the past week to 
strengthen its bid for a playoff 
spot in the Quincy Softball 
League's National League West. 

Currently one game out of 
first place, Sabina's defeated 
Mclnnis Corp., 5-3, with Paul 
Bregoli having three runs batted 
in. Scott Healy had two hits and 
made a diving stop of an 
overthrow at first base to save 
two runs. Tim Flynn also 
sparkled at shortstop and Ted 
Stevenson pitched a steady 
game. 

Sabina's also topped Beau's, 
9-6, scoring four runs in the final 
inning. Don Smith had three hits 
and two RBIs and Healy, the 
team's leading batter, again had 



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two hits and two RBIs. George 
McCall in left field had six 



putouts and threw out two 
baserunners to kill Beau's rallies. 



Koch Club Montclair District 
Plans Awards Night July 23 



Richard J. Koch, executive 
director of the Koch Club 
announces that the Montclair 



District of the Koch Club will 
hold its fifth annual boys 
baseball and girls softball leagues 



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parents and awards night July 23 
at Bishop Field, Montclair. 

District Director Howard 
Crowley will be the emcee. 
Assisting him will be John 
Cafferty, leader of boys baseball 
and Janet Crowley who 
supervised the girls softball 
program. All parents are invited 
to attend. Refreshments will be 
served. 

The winning boys baseball 
team in the Intermediate 
Division was The Detroit Tigers. 
Team members were: Edward 
Doherty, John Wahlberg, Capt. 
Michael Doyle, James 
Zupkofska, Thomas O'Malley, 
John Bille, Dean Moore, Robert 
Stone, Steven Evans, Peter 
McGillicuddy, Al Saluti and 
John Connolly. 

The Junior Division had 
co-champions. The New York 
Mets team members were 
Timothy McGrath, Eric 
Peterson, Barry Higgins, William 
Reilly, Arthur Douglas, William 
Hughes, Michael Saluti, Thomas 
Bille, Michael Donovan, Robert 
Connolly, Scott Hamel, William 
Kinsella, Mark Wilkins, Jeffery 
Bovarnick and Vincent 
Christiani. 

The Atlanta Braves team 
members were Ernest 
Bortolotto, Andrew Simmons, 
Paul Gorczyca, Michael Ross, 
Richard Chiruna, Richard 
Wilkins, Neil Doherty, Kevin 
Cafferty, John Outcrbridge, 
Robert Fitzgerald, Mark Bash, 
Patrick Duffy, Michael Flaherty, 
Daryl Fracose and Matthew 
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•Ex«cutiv« League 

Powers Scores 5 
To Pace Blues, 7-1 



Jack Powers scored five goals 
to lead the Blue team to a 7-1 
win over the Greens in Summer 
Executive Hockey League action 
at the Quincy Youth Arena. 

Kevin White and Marty 
Tolson assisted on Powers' first 
goal, Wayne Cooper on his 
second and third, Tolson and 
Cooper on his fourth and Tolson 
and White on his fifth. The other 
Blue goals were scored by 
Cooper unassisted and Gary 
DeCoste, also unassisted. The 
lone Green goal was scored by 
Tom Boussy with assists for Phil 
Qark and Bob Toland. 

The Reds walloped the Golds, 
8-2, surging after the Golds took 
a 2-0 lead on goals by Pete 



LaBerge and Tom Roberts, with 
two assists for Ed Holt and one 
for LaBerge. 

Bucky Zanardelli scored the 
first Red goal with Joe Chase 
and Jim Daly assisting, Daly 
scored with assists for Zanardelli 
and Jack Hurley, Chase made it 
3-2 with Wally MacLean 
assisting, Daly scored with an 
assist for Zanardelli, Dick 
Reinhardt scored with Fran 
Moriarty assisting, Daly scored 
on a pass from Chase, Jack 
McDonald continued the 
onslaught with Bill LaForest 
assisting and Hurley wrapped up 
the scoring with Chase and 
MacLean having assists. 



Greens, Whites Win 
In Squirt House Games 



The Green team defeated the 
Yellows, 6-1, in the Squirt 
House League as Tommy 
Murphy had two goals. Rich 
O'SuUivan, Kevin Craig, Mike 
Marshall and Timmy McGrath 
one each. 

Marshall and Murphy had 
three assists apiece, Craig two, 
Ricky Miller, O'Sullivan and 
Billy Gray one each. Dennis 
Furtado scored for the Yellows 
with Dave MacMurdo assisting. 

The Blues and Reds played to 



a 1-1 tie as Paul Egan scored for 
the Blues and Steve Baylis for 
the Reds. Dick Mahoney and 
Mike Riley had assists for the 
Blues and Chris Gorman and 
Kevin White for the Reds. 

The Whites defeated the 
Orange team, 4-1, with Bobby 
Ready scoring twice and Paul 
McCabe and Brian Mock once 
each. Mock, Bill Bradley, Rich 
Milano, Ready and Mike O'Hara 
had assists. Mark Tenney scored 
for the Orange team. 



Celtics Clinic At ENC Friday 



The Boston Celtics are staging 
a three-week program of free 
basketball clinics and among 
them will be one at Eastern 
Nazarene College Friday at 6:30 
p.m. 

The program will run from 
6:30 to 8:30 and will feature 
lectures and demonstrations by 
Celtic players and coaches as 
well as autograph-signing 
sessions plus an extra session of 
contests, all-star games and 
films. 

Among the Celtics players 
who are participating are Don 
Nelson, Paul Silas, Hank Finkel 
and Steve Kuberski. Coaches 
Tom Heinshon and John Killilea, 
former Quincy High standout, 
and former Celtics Tom Sanders, 
Bob Brannum, Jim Loscutoff 
and Clarence Glover will also 



take part. 

The clinic stresses 
fundamentals and will endeavor 
to involve as many youngsters as 
possible in first hand instruction 
from the players and coaches. 

"We started this program last 
year with morning sessions," 
said Celtics General Manager 
Red Auerbach. "We found that, 
while they were very successful, 
we were unable to have 
teenagers and adults attend. We 
feel that the later starting time 
should give the program wider 
exposure. Our aim is to teach 
good basketball and to, in some 
measure, aid the summer 
basketball programs in the 15 
towns and cities we will visit." 

The Quincy clinic is being run 
in conjunction with the Quincy 
Recreation Department. 



GAME TRAVELERS 



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• Senior Summer League 

Clovers Bow 
To Walpole, 7-6 



Thursday, lulyl^ 1974 Qujncy; Son Pftgc 27 



The Quincy Clovers dropped a 
free-scoring 7-6 decision to the 
Walpole Chiefs last week in the 
Quincy Youth Arena Summer 
Senior Hockey League. 

Walpole took a 2-1 first 
period lead, Frankie Guest 
scoring for Quincy at 1 2:06 with 
P. J. Flaherty assisting. 

In the second period Guest 
tied it up for the Clovers at 2:40 
with assists for Flaherty and 
Gene Farina, but Walpole scored 
two before Flaherty scored at 
12:29 with Tim Monill and 
Farina assisting. Walpole took a 
4-3 lead into the final session. 

Walpole made it 6-3 and 
Guest, Quincy High star, 
completed his second hat trick 
of the year at 13:55 with assists 
for Farina arrd Morrill. Walpole's 
John Baldassari scored his third 
goal for Walpole at 15:23 and 
Quincy scored twice in the last 
half minute, Brian Coughlin 
scoring at 19:31 with Flaherty 
and Farina assisting, and Charlie 
Ahem at 19:54 with Guest and 
Flaherty assisting. 

Guest had three goals and an 
assist, Flaherty a goal and four 

• Mite House 



W L T Pts, GF GA 
Boston 

Budmen 5 10 34 15 
Newman Club 3 11 7 31 25 
Quincy 

Clovers 
Atlantic 

Flames 2 
Whitman Cats 1 
Walpole 

Chiefs 1 



2 3 4 23 26 



3 
3 



4 25 26 
3 22 28 



4 2 18 32 



assists and Farina four assists for 
Quincy, while John Heffernan 
and Baldassari each had three 
goals for Walpole. Baldassari also 
had an assist. 

The game was spiced by 14 
penalties. 

The powerful Boston Budmen 
remained unbeaten with a 9-3 
romp over Whitman Cats and the 
Newman Club edged the 
Atlantic Flames, 7-6. 

Ne.xt Wednesday at the Youth 
Arena Quincy will play Whitman 
at 6:30, Atlantic will face 
Boston at 8:15 and Walpole will 
meet Newman Club at 10 
o'clock. 



McCabe Powers 
Yellows With 6 Goals 



Bobby McCabe scored all six 
goals as the Greens nipped the 
Yellows, 6-5, in the Mite House 
League. Dennis Shannon had 
two assists. Paul Marshall had 
four goals for the Yellow team 
and Jim Milano one. Sean Barry 
and Gerry DeAngelis had two 
assists apiece and Bob Kane one. 

The Reds topped the Blues, 
3-1, with Chris Hurley having all 



three goals and Billy Hughes 
three assists. Scott Messina 
scored for the Blues. 

The Orange team walloped 
the Whites, 7-2, as Danny Kelly 
had the hat trick, Pete Quinn 
two goals, Tim Barry and Mark 
Loughman one each. Kelly had 
three assists, Quinn and Brian 
Ostiguy one each. Brian Chase 
scored both White goals. 



Reds Defeat Greens 
In Midget House Action 



In the Midget House League 
the Red team defeated the 
Greens, 5-2. Art Bertoni had two 
goals and Jim McConville, Paul 
Duggan and Ed MacDonald one 
each for the winners. MacDonald 
had two assists, Dennis Doherty 
and McConville one apiece. For 
the Greens Ed Martin and Bud 
Nevins had the goals and Charlie 



Plunkett an assist. 

The Orange team breezed past 
the Whites, 8-0, as Bill Morrison 
had the hat trick, Jim Constas 
two goals, Tom Parke, Arthur 
Powers and Jim Connelly one 
each. Kevin Doyle had three 
assists, Constas and Morrison 
two apiece, Harrison and Powers 
one each. 







MclNNIS CONTRACTORS finished first In points but second in goals scored in the Quincy Youth 
Hockey Association Squirt House League. Left to right, front row, Mike Nevins, Jimmy Paolucci, Paul 
Relnhardt, Dave Hickey, Bobby Stevens, Tony Chlocchio, Mike Chlocchio, Steven Hall, Mitch Mclnnls; 
second row. Coach Dick Relnhardt, Joe Graham, Billy Curran, Steven RIcci, Ed Campbell, Steven 
Howley, Glen Collins, Joe Livingstone, Kevin Burke, Coach Dave Hickey. 

• Pee Wee House 

Yellows, Blues, Whites 



Skate To Wins 



In the Pee Wee House League 
the Yellow team defeated the 
Greens, 5-3. Steve Walsh and 
Bob Welch each had two goals 
for the winners and Bobby 
Bolster one. 

Bob Beniers and Jim Ferrara 
each had two assists, Jim 
Rooney, Jim Paolucci, Tony 
Chiochio and Mike Nevins one 
apiece. Mike Hussey, Martin 
Gray and Chuckle Marshall 
scored for the Greens with 
assists for Marshall, Ed Doherty, 



Jim Morash, Paul McGrath and 
Wayne Cooper. 

The Blues edged the Reds, 
4-3, as Bob Currier and Robbie 
Murray had two goals each and 
John Lyons had two assists, 
Mark Boussy, Freddie Palmer 
and Bryan Flynn one each. For 
the Reds Robbie Craig had two 
goals and Robbie Zanardelli one 
with assists for Zanardelli, 
Johnny Toland and Karl Nord. 

The Whites defeated the 
Orange team, 7-5. Mike Barry 



and Mark Messina each had the 
hat trick for the Whites and 
Mike Quigg had the other goal. 
Messina had four assists, Quigg 
three, Barry and Bob Palermo 
one each. 

For the Orange team Charlie 
McManus and Scott Richardson 
had two goals apiece and Danny 
Flynn one. McManus and John 
Baylis had two assists each, Mike 
Ferreira, Steve Shoemaker, Brian 
Sullivan, Ed Campbell and Gene 
Kornse one each. 



•Bantam House 



Whites, Blues, Greens In Wins 



The Whites defeated the 
Orange team, 7-4, in the Bantam 
House League with Mike 
Bennett and Pete Golden having 
two goals apiece, Mike Pitts, Bob 
Collins and Paul McDermott one 
each. 

Jacky Quigg had three assists, 
Paul Zenga two, John Kelly, 
Golden and Bennett one apiece. 
For the Orange team Kevin 
McGrath, John Newcomb, Paul 
Palmer and Don Perdios had the 
goals and Newcomb, Mike Storer 



and Pat Bamberry assists. 

The Blues walloped the Reds, 
7-2, as Louis Mathews and Ken 
Kustka each had two goals, Pat 
CUfford, Ray Coleman and 
Eddie Kane one each. Mathews 
had thre. assists, Coleman and 
John Norton two apiece, Russ 
DiPietro, Kane Kustka and Mike 
Van Tassell one each. Mike 
Soldano and Mike Welch scored 
for the Reds with Dave Abbott 
having an assist. 

The Greens romped over the 



Yellows, 9-3, sparked by Mike 
Bondarick's hat trick. Dave 
Lewis and Chris Erikson had two 
goals each, Sean Jago and Steve 
White one apiece. Erikson had 
three assists, Pistorino, Dan 
Gorman, White, Jago, Jim 
O'Brien, Bondarick, Mark 
Donovan and John Satkewich one 
each. For the Yellows Ron 
Mariano, Bobby Hayes and Steve 
Whittemore had the goals and 
Tommy Brennan, Mike Walsh 
and Bob Molly assists. 



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Page 28 Quincy Sun Thursday, July 18, 1974 

• Senior Babe Ruth 



Quincy Places 4 On All-Stars 



Quincy will have four players 
for the first time when the 
Senior Babe Ruth League all-star 
competition gets underway this 
weekend. 

The South Shore League's 
two entries will meet the Central 
Mass. entries with the Quincy 
all-stars playing at Adams Field 
Saturday at 2 p.m. The second 
game will be Sunday at 2, also at 
Adams Field. 

The state playoff games are 
single elimination with double 
elimination beginning at the 
regional level. The Senior Babe 
Ruth League World Series will 
be played at Mattoon, Illinois. 

Quincy's representatives are 
Dave Power, hard-hitting first 
ba-seman who is batting .421; 



Gerry Bugden, who is regarded 
by most as one of the top 
18-year old pitchers in the area 
with a 3-1 record, 34 strikeouts 
in 32 innings and a fine 1.40 
earned run average; Mark 
Jaehnig, outstanding infielder 
with a .304 batting average and 
an on-base average of .528, and 
Paul Messina, aggressive, speedy 
16-year old infielder with a .393 
batting average and 16 stolen 
bases. 

Other teams in the league 
have also contributed some 
outstanding players and an 
exciting end to this year's play is 
expected. 

Quincy's entry in the South 
Shore League, Data Services, 



broke a four-game losing streak 
last week with a 7-5 win over 
Weymouth Painters. This 
brought Quincy's record to 
8-6-1. 

Nick Anastas came off the 
bench in the final inning to pitch 
with the bases loaded and one 
out and two pitches later got the 
save and preserve Bugden's win 
on a line drive double play to 
shortstop Jaehnig, who made the 
play unassisted. Weymouth 
scored three runs in the inning. 
Prior to that inning Bugden had 
allowed only three hits for two 
runs in the second inning. 

Messina and Spike Cooney led 
the Quincy attack with two hits 
each as the team exploded for 
six runs in the third inning. 



Jim Beaton Flying Scot Winner At Squantum 



Jim Beaton's "Dream Awhile" 
breezed home a winner in the 
Flying Scot Class at the 
Squantum Yacht Club on 
Saturday over a 12-mile course 
in light air. Finishing second and 
third were Bob Montgomery's 
No. 2422, Dave Gwynn's No. 



414. 

The summary: 

Dream Awhile, Jim Beaton, 
2-24-00. 

No. 2422, Bob Montgomery, 
2-4800. 

No. 414, Dave Gwynn, 



2-54-00. 

Other finishers: Betty Ann, 

Norm Kluger; Brandy, Gabe 

Perez; No. 2454, Earl 

Sutherland; No. 2263, Bob 
Becker; No. 161 1, John Brown; 
No. 1331, Dave Ottobrini. 



O'Brien Club Wins Y Senior Loop Title 



The O'Brien Club of Quincy, 
which last winter was one of the 
outstanding semi-pro basketball 
teams in New England and 
co-champion of the Cranberry 
League, last week won the 
championship of the 16-team 
Quincy YMCA Senior Summer 




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Basketball League, which played 
its games on the outdoor courts 
at the Y. 

The O'Brien Club routed 
Curran's Cafe, 80-56, in the 
playoff finals, to win the title 
and finish with a 16-0 record. 
The team was the Division I 
winner. 

Ed Miller scored 24 points for 
the O'Briens, Gene Walcott had 
1 2 and Alan Dalton 1 1 . Also 
playing were Bob McNamara, 
Ron Bradley, Leo Papile, Gary 
Bowen, Rico Cabral and John 
Douglas. 

Curran's was the Division II 
champ. In the playoff semifinals 
O'Brien walloped the Caulfield 



Club, 89-62, and Curran's 
topped the Goodless A.C., 
71-61. 

The O'Brien Club is also 
playing in the open division of 
the Boston Neighborhood 
League [BNBL] and is 
undefeated in four games. Many 
pros and former pros from the 
NBA and ABA are playing in 
this league. 

The O'Briens also have a B 
team in the Boston league and 
among the players are three 
former North Quincy High 
standouts, Steve Miller, Tom 
Carnes and Brian Donahue. 

-TOM SULLIVAN 



Serafini, McPeck 
Furnace Brook Winners 



In the weekly mixed Scotch 
foursome at the Furnace Brook 
Golf Club Mario Serafini and 
Helene McPeck shot low gross of 
41. 

Joe Barranco and Jennie 
Lutfy shot low net of 3 1 . Dick 
Corbin and Dolly Nogler had 



second net of 32, Tom Mulroy 
and Ginny McCann third net of 
33 and there was a three-way tie 
for fourth net of 34 between Joe 
Fitzgerald and Mae Butler, Matt 
Smith and Priscilla O'Neill and 
Charles Rizzo and Marie 
Corayer. 



Water Ski Schedule 



Following is the Quincy 
Recreation Department's Water 
Ski Schedule for the period from 



today [Thursday], through July 
26. 



DATE 



TIDE 



TIME 



BEACH 




3-5050' 



Thursday, July 18 


10:46 a.m. 


8:45- 


12:45 


Baker 


Friday, July. 19', 


11:41 a.m. 


9:45- 


1:45 


Mound St. 


Monday^ July 22 


2:18 p.m. 


12-4 




Fenno 


Tuesday, July 23 


3:10 p.m. 


1 -5 




Nickerson 


Wednesday, July 24 


4:02 p.m. 


2-6 




Heron Road 


Thursday, July 25 


4:58 p.m. 


3-7 




Baker 


Friday, July 26 


5:53 p.m. 


3:30- 


7:30 


Mound St. 




SUBSCRIPTION FORM 




FILL OUT THIS SUBSCRIPTION BLANK AND MAIL 

TO TNE QUINCY SUN 1101 HANCOCK ST.: OUINCY 021IS 



B2 ISSUES FOR $4.00 



NAME 



STREET. 
CITY 



STATE 



ZIP CODE. 




CHECK ONE OF TWO BOXES BELOW 

I ] ENCLOSED IS MY CHECK FOR $4.00 
[ 1 PLEASE BILL ME FOR $4.00 

OUT OF STATE $5.00 




mmmmmmmmmmmi 





Recreation 
Roundup 




By JOE MOSESSO 

The Quincy Recreation 
Department's summer program 
is now in full swing and the 
enthusiasm and interest shown 
by the youth of Quincy towards 
the program is really something 
to see. 

Tennis instructor's Betty 
Vittner and Kevin McGinely 
concentrated this past week on 
teaching the children the 
forehand stroke. A few of those 
who showed particular promise 
were Carolyn Mercier, Kim 
Graham, and Robert McAuliffe 
of Squantum, Heron Road's Ann 
Marie Nigro, Joe Lynch and 
Janet Dennis, and Cindy Bureau 
and John Joland of Whitwell. 

Music Specialist Karen Walsh 
continues to scout around the 
city playgrounds for children 
interested in singing in the 
Quincy Recreation Rythm Band, 
which will be performing again 
this year on Field Day. She has 
come up with some melodious 
songsters including Chris Kelley, 
Nancy Tolson and Mary Beth 
McCarthy of Perkins, and 
Squantum's Kim Graham, Laurie 
Graham and Scott Sluhocki. She 
reminds all children interested in 
the music program to save all 
coffee cans, pepsi cans and pie 
tins for the making of musical 
intruments. 

Interest in the golf program 
continues to rise reports golf 
specialist Don Smith. Some of 
tne heavy hitters this past week 
were LaBrecque's Leo Bottary, 
and Bobby Henrickson, Susan 
Ayles and Donna Brennan of 
Forbes Hill and Snug Harbor's 
Kevin Williams and Billy Bart. 

There are many jeweled 
beauties walking around Quincy 
this week and the fancy 
adornments they are wearing no 
doubt are the product of the arts 
and crafts program. 

Specialists Gina Kelley and 
Darlene D'Olympio last week 
instructed the children on how 
to make such priceless treasures 
as earrings, rings and bracelets. 
Princesses walking around are 
Perkin's Claire Lynch, Terry 
Hack and Janice McAuliffe, 
Caroline Park, Sue Megnia and 
Tricia Craig of Baker and Faxon 
Park's Tricia O'Toole, Nancy 
Martin and Joanne Marcel. 

The Dolphins are big favorites 
of the youth of Quincy. They're 
•'Sparky", "Sprite" and 
"Lucky", the three dolphins at 
the Nantasket Aquarium. Last 
week nature specialists Paula 
Weidmann and Michael Parros 
took a busload of youngsters to 
see the dolphin show. Some of 
the enthusiastic members of the 
audience were Danny Marsters, 
Craig Dibona and Debbie 
Mallory of Merrymount and 
Beechwood Knoll's Joe Phelen, 
Lisa Nolan and Steven Canty. 

Archery specialist Tim Flynn 
reports his bowmen around the 
city are perfecting their skill. 
Timmy cites the improvement of 
LaBrecque's John Connolly, 
Tom O'Connor and Peter 
Chernicki, Squantum's Tom 
Pound and Joe Toomey and 
Myles Standish's family the 
Anderson's with Jimmy, 
Johnny, Timmy and Rhonda. 

What's the fastest sport 
around? Is it hockey? No it's 
water skiing and if you don't 
think so go down and watch 
some of the city's youth fly 
swiftly through the wave. Some 
of the daredevils taking part in 
the Quincy Recreation Water Ski 
Program are Kate Donelin, Bud 
Palmer, Mike Dee, Tony 
Antonetti and Mary Ilacqua. 

On the playgrounds this week 
the children participated in 



many interesting activities. At 
Forbes Hill some young 
Rembrandt's displayed their 
talents by creating designs on 
rocks. Some of the artists were 
Allison Fuller, Pat Welch and 
Nancy Tollard. There were also 
some artistically inclined 
children at Wollaston, where 
some marvelous black and white 
silhouettes of George 
Washington were made. Some of 
the most creative were by Pat 
Feeney, Marcia Galluzzo and 
Kevin Jay. 

Barbie dolls are the favorites 
of little girls everywhere. At 
Myles Standish this is especially 
true. The children one afternoon 
made some beautiful clothes for 
their dolls including everything 
from dressing gowns to 
dungarees. Rhonda Anderson, 
Marcia Parker ar.d Linda Airi 
were the leading stylists. At Fore 
River "Invisible Wonderball" is 
the in-thing. In the words of 
Fore River leader Joe Marani, 
"You have to see it to believe 
it." 

Finally, situated at the edge 
of Blue Hills is the Recreation 
outpost of Shea Rink. The other 
day some of the pioneers there 
tried their luck at fishing in St. 
Moritz pond. They went to their 
task with high hopes, but left 
disappointed and disgruntled. A 
few nibbles were the extent of 
the fishing for the day. Some of 
the fishermen were Billy Coose, 
Tom Cannoh, Kevin Riggs and 
Brenda Bersani. 

In the Recreation Sports 
Leagues there were some 
interesting games. In junior 
baseball in District 6 the two 
teams expected to vie for the 
championship Bradford and 
O'Rourke, both opened their 
season with victories, Bradford 
mauled outmanned Columbia 16 
to 0. Fireballer Ed Tinney 
mystified the Columbia batters 
striking out 1 1 . 

Bradford's offensive punch 
was supplied by Chris Chevalier 
and Mike Fantasia. Chevalier 
socked a towering home run, 
while Fantasia punched out a 
pair of doubles. Meanwhile 
O'Rourke dumped Kincaide 5-1 
with Greg Oriola huriing a 
3-hitter. The big stick for 
O'Rourke was Andy Carrera 
who had 3 hits including a long 
triple. Mike Avitable, who 
banged out two hits, was the 
only bright spot for Kincaide. 

In senior baseball Forbes 
Hill's Kevin McGlaughlin hurled 
a brilliant no-hitter over Faxon 
Field. The score was 2-0. 
McGlaughlin, overpowering to 
say the least, simply mowed 
down the Faxon Field batters. 
The Hilltoppers two runs came 
on a triple by Peter Donovan 
followed by a sacrifice fly by 
Kevin Woriey. The insurance run 
came when pitcher McGlaughlin 
helped his own cause by singling 
to left. He then proceeded to 
steal second and third and 
scored on Jay Nelson's single up 
the middle. 

Each year Wollaston 
playground always has at least 
one championship team. It's a 
tradition in the recreation sports 
scene. Well, this year Wollaston's 
junior basketball team most 
likely will be the squad to bring 
home the gold, if last weeks 
action was any indication of 
their talent. Wollaston put two 
wins under their belt with one 
sided victories over Forbes Hill 
33-1 7 and Stoney brae 45-3. 



•Junior Baseball 

VFW Moves Into Top Spot 
Behind O'Toole's Pitches 



Thursday, July 18, 1974 Quincy Sun Page 29 



VFW has moved into first 
place in the Quincy Junior 
Baseball League's National 
League and playing a prominent 
role in the team's rise has been 
the pitching of Paul O'Toole. 

O'Toole, who struck out 10 in 
hurling the VFW to a 8-2 win 
over Houghs Neck, has a 7-0 
record, has pitched two no-hit, 
no-run games and has 75 
strikeouts. 

In the win over Houghs Neck, 
Brian Tobin, Joe Crifo and 
Gordon Spencer led the attack, 
while Greg Madden, Jeff 
Giordani and Tom McFarlane 
led the HN offense. Jeff 
Giordani pitched for HN and 
was relieved by McFarlane. 
Giordani struck out eight. 

The VFW also walloped 
Burgin Platner, 12-3, as winning 
pitcher Spencer fanned eight. 
O'Toole had a home run and 
double, Spencer a homer, Crifo 
two singles and Danny Boyle 
and Tom Joe Connolly a single 
each. 

The VFW, which had its most 
fruitful week of the year, topped 
Foley Chrysler, 9-6, as O'Toole 
was again the winning pitcher. 
Spencer had a double, Brian 
Tobin two singles and Boyle, 
O'Toole and Gus Gonzales a 
single each. Jim Sullivan was 
outstanding behind the plate 
until he suffered a fractured 
elbow when hit by a foul tip. 
Tom Joe Connolly replaced him 
and did a fine job. 

Completing a great week, the 
VFW romped over Remick's, 
124, with Danny Boyle the 
winning pitcher. O'Toole had a 



AMERICAN LEAGUE 



Sears 

Houghs Neck 
Boston Gear 
Foley Chrysler 
Burgin Platner 
Remick's 



W 

16 

12 

9 

7 
6 



5 

7 
10 
12 
15 
18 



NATIONAL LEAGUE 



w 



VFW 


14 


6 


Keohane's 


14 


7 


Kiwanis 


13 


6 


Rotary 


13 


7 


Colonial Federal 


10 


9 


Elks 


3 


17 



home run and double, Tom 
Roche a double, Bruce Tobin 
two singles, Crifo two singles 
and Brian Tobin and Connolly a 
single each. 

Rotary added two wins during 
the week, defeating Remick's, 
7-1 , and Boston Gear, 8-4. 

John Costigan pitched 
outstanding ball against 
Remick's and he was hooked up 
in a great duel with Chris Segalla 
until the seventh when Rotary 
exploded for six runs. Costigan, 
who led off with a single, scored 
the winning run on Rich 
Finnegan's single. Tony Camillo 
at first base and catcher Billy 
Burt stood out defensively for 
Rotary. Mike Ford and Finnegan 
had doubles and Burt, Brian 
Donovan, Buddy Cappola, 
Finnegan and Costigan singles. 
Paul Anastas had a double and 



single for Remick's, while Mike 
Bythrow, Chris Segalla, Mark 
Veasey, Bob Todd and John 
Sullivan had other hits. 

In the win over Boston Gear, 
Donovan was the starting 
pitcher. The game went into 
extra innings. The game was tied 
in the bottom of the fifth when 
Gary NiNardo of Rotary came 
on in relief and did not allow a 
runner past second in the sixth 
and seventh innings. 

Eleven-year old Ronnie 
Pettinelli made two brilliant 
catches to save the game and 
send it into overtime. Ford and 
Cappola sparkled on defense and 
Donovan drove in the winning 
run. Rotary went on to score 
three more runs. 

Over the six innings he 
pitched. Bob Hayes of Gear did 
well but had to be replaced by 
Paul Dwyer in the seventh. 
Hayes had two doubles. Bob 
DuBois a double and Dwyer a 
single for Gear. For Rotary the 
1 1-year old DiNardo, in addition 
to his relief pitching, had a 
double and two singles. Burt and 
Donovan each had two singles 
and Pettinelli, Costigan and 
Camillo a single each. 

Houghs Neck walloped 
Colonial Federal, 13-5, with 
Mike Abboud the winning 
pitcher. Jeff Giordani had a 
home run, triple and double for 
HN, 10-year old Tom O'Connor 
and McFarland doubles and 
Madden, Greg Oriola, Abboud, 
Steve Notorangelo, McFarland 
and nine-year old Marty 
McLaughlin a single each. Oriola 
started a fast double play. 



We^ 



scor 



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Deliver 



Ouincy's Newspaper 



To 



Ouincy Homes 



The 




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We'll Show You How 
Call Mr. Niblett 471-3100 



Quincy Babe Ruth 
All-Stars Defeat 
Milton, Hingham 



The Quincy National Babe 
Ruth All-Stars met Braintree 
Tuesday for the District 11 
championship. 

The winner will play the 
District 12 champ for the 
sectional title and a crack ^ the 
state crown. 

Quincy defeated MUton, 3-1, 
on the Fourth of July with Lou 
Fishman pitching a four-hitter 
and striking out five. Quincy 
scored a run in the second inning 
on a walk to John Ferris, who 
stole second and scored on Jim 
McGinley's single. The winning 
runs scored in the fifth when 
Bob Stack singled for one of his 
tWo hits, Fishman walked, both 



runners advanced on a wild pitch 
and scored on Chuck LoPresti's 
single. 

Saturday Quincy moved into 
the district finals by edging 
Hingham 2-1. 

LoPresti pitched a six-hitter 
and struck out three. Hingham 
took the lead with a run in the 
second but Quincy tied it in the 
sixth on a walk to Stack, who 
went to second on a wild pitch, 
moved up on LoPresti's infield 
hit and scored on Ferris' single. 
Quincy won it in the seventh 
when Frank Cangemi walked as 
did Stack and with two outs 
Fishman singled in Kelly, who 
had run for Cangemi. 



Comdr, Thomas McDonough 
Attending Officers' Course 



Navy Comdr. Thomas W. 
McDonough, of 188 Samoset 
Ave., Merrymount, is attending a 
two-week senior reserve officers' 
course at the U.S. Naval War 
College, Newport, R.I. 

He will be familiarized with 
the school's regular training 



program, and course of 
instruction, so that he can 
communicate a better 
understanding of the college's 
mission. McDonough was 
selected to assume a temporary 
active duty status, and to attend 
the course, by the commandant 
of his reserve district. 



WASH 



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EXTERIOR CAR WASH^ 

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Drying By Machine 
And Man Power 

We know we give 
the best custom exterior 
Car Wash available 

We Guarantee 

The Finest Wash Available 

Econo Car Wash 

459 Southern Artery . » 

(opposite the Quincy Police Station! 



:i^' 



Page 30 Quincy Sun Thursday, July 18, 1974 




BANK PLANS CHANGES - John Vivian [left] , president of the Quincy Cooperative Bank, presents 
Mayor Walter J. Hannon with coloring book depicting window cartoons as part of extensive remodeling 
of home office at 1259 Hancock St., Quincy. 

[Quincy Sun Photo by Laban Whittaker] 

Hancock Bank Introduces 
Thief-Proof Government Check Plan 

throughout 



An automatic and thief-proof 
Government Check Deposit Plan 



has been introduced by the 
Hancock Bank at all of its 



RENT A 
NEW CAR 



- fPEE NATIONWIDE RESERVATIONS 

WE RENT FORDS AND OTHER FINE CARS 

FREE OUT-OF TOWN RESERVATIONS — 800^874 5000 

(no charge to calling party) 



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MINIMUM MILEAGE CHARGE 40 MILES PER DAY 



Car Stolen or Damaged? 
Call Us! 

Check with your insurance agent for 
Theft or Loss of Use Coverage. 

Our rates may allow you to Rent a car 
at Special Low Rates 



'You get a clean car with every rental' 



Econo Car Rental 



[we're the ones that cost less] 



459 Southern Artery, Quincy 
[at Quincy Minit Car Wash] 



Hrs: 8 - 5 Men., -Sat. 
1 Sunday 



4794098 



offices throughout Norfolk 
County. 

According to President 
William E. Kelley, the bank's 
plan in addition to eliminating 
check thefts is a time saving, 
fuel-saving effortless way to 
safeguard government allotments 
or pay. 

The Government Check 
Deposit Plan provides for 
government benefit checks to be 
sent directly , from the 
government to a checking or 
savings account in Hancock 
Bank. 

The amount of the benefit 
check or Federal pay is credited 
electronically to a customer's 
Money Tree account on the 
same day he would normally 
receive his check the old way. 

Kelley said that Hancock 
Bank guarantees the amount of 
the benefit or pay check will be 
credited to the customer's 
account each payday even if the 
payment from the government is 
delayed in the mail or for some 
other reason. 

He said customers may draw 
on any and all of their benefits 
that same day, if needed. All 
accounts are insured by the 
Federal Deposit Insurance 
Corporation. 




Quincy Cooperative Bank 
In $200,000 
Expansion Program 



The Quincy Cooperative Bank 
which is observing its 85th 
anniversary is in the midst of a 
$200,000 program of expansion 
and remodeling. 

Changes in the home office at 
1259 Hancock St., in Quincy Sq. 
is but one sign of the bank's 
growth. 

Soon a new branch will be 
opening in Cohasset at 
Tedeschi's Shopping Center on 
Route 3-A. The main office and 
the Hanover Branch are now 
featuring extended office hours 
and banking services including 
the popular NOW account. 

Changes in the interior of the 
bank includes an expansion of 
facilities to provide more 
services for more customers. The 
bank will occupy the entire end 
of the Munroe Building and will 
add another customer entrance 
facing the Mclntyre Mall. 

John A. Vivian, an experienced 
bank administrator and new 
president of the Quincy 
Cooperative Bank, has presented 
Mayor Walter J. Hannon with 
the first coloring book based on 
window cartoons. 

In making the presentation 
Vivian said, "Not only are we 
concerned about our customers, 
we're expressing our great 
confidence in downtown 
Quincy. We're enthusiastic about 
the work that the citv 



government headed by Mayor 
Hannon continues to do in 
revitalizing the downtown area. 
As a growing business we're 
happy to be a part of these 
developments." 

Vivian outlined the new 
changes which include a change 
of name which must first be 
approved by the directors, share 
holders, and the State banking 
commissioner; new directors 
rooms in the basement which 
the bank will make available for 
community use during 
non-banking hours; and a new 
entrance on the Mclntyre Mall 
side of the buDding. 

Other changes include a 
completely remodeled main 
lobby; and free parking for bank 
customers at the end of the 
building. The bank will 
distribute coloring books and 
crayons to youngsters coming in. 
The books will feature cartoon 
workmen by Artist Dick Noyes 
of Newburyport. 

Vivian said he expects the 
renovations, begun two months 
ago, will be completed next 
month. In the meantime to 
make light of the fact "that the 
bank is coming down around our 
heads the bank windows have 
been decorated with cartoon 
figures of workmen depicting in 
a "tongue in cheek manner" 
what is going on inside." 



Shirley Chase Supervisor 
Telephone Answering Service 



Mrs. Shirley Chase of East 
Weymouth has been named 
supervisor uf the Quincy 
Telephone Answering Service, 
which serves many South Shore 
business enterprises from offices 
at 27 Temple St. 

Mrs. Chase, who has been 



employed as an operator by the 
service for seven years, recently 
returned from a three-day 
supervisor's seminar in 
Columbus, Oi.io. 

Timothy Reardon of Hingham 
is the owner of the answering 
service. 



Aaron Stern Honored 
By Western Reserve 



Aaron Stern, of Quincy, was 



/fonn s J4air ^t^iin 



9 



r 

REGULAR HAIR CUTS - RAZOR CUTS 

HAIR COLORING - HAIR STRAiGHlENING 

MtN'S TOUPbES - APPOINTMENTS WALK-INS 

lOHlN ANGELIJCCI 5 Temple St., Quincy 4719637 






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ofh^ob'H 



iU«« 



ottv 



We 

process 

your 

claims 



Slims 



honored by Western Reserve 
Life Assurance Company as its 
No. 1 producer in the State of 
Massachusetts, at the company's 
annual June Jamboree recently 
held in Clearwater, Fla. 

Western Reserve Life is a 
subsidiary of Pioneer Western 
Corporation, a natinriRl financial 
services organization whose 
other principal subsidiary is the 
Boston-based management 
company for the Pioneer group 
of mutual funds. 

Stern and other midyear sales 
leaders of Western Reserve were 
honored at the conference 
attended by nearly 250 top 
representatives from all regions 
of the country. 



196 Washington St. 
GLASS • QUINCY • GR 9-4400 



Save Gas and Money .. 
shop locally. 



WANT SOME 
HELP? 

ILL'S TRUCKING^ 

773-8170 



PICKUPS 

AND 
DELIVERIES 




keepyourN 

COOL... 

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and transmission 

a breok..,. 

CLEAN YOU R COOI ING SYSTEM! 

MORSE'S 
AUTORADIAtOR 

Coe/mg & Air Conditioning 
SpotialitH 

328-7464 

179 Wart Squanfvm St., No. Ouirity 



Thursday, July 18, 1974 Quincy Sun Page 31 




COMMONWKALTH OF 
MASSACHUSETTS 

Norfolk, ss. Probate Court 

No. 74P1407 

To all persons interested in the 
estate of HELEN M. HAWLEY late 
of Quincy in said County ^ deceased. 
And to the Attorney General of said 
Commonwealth, if required. 

A petition has been presented to 
said Court for probate of a certain 
instrument purporting to be the last 
will of said deceased by W. PAUL 
HAWLEY of Lafayette in the State 
of Louisiana praying that he be 
appointed executor thereof without 
giving a surety on his bond. 

If you desire to object thereto you 
or your attorney should file a written 
appearance in said Court at Dedham 
before ten o'clock in the forenoon on 
July 31, 1974, the return day of this 
citation. 

Witness, ROBERT M. FORD, 
Esquire, First Judge of said Court, 
this June 26, 1974, 

PAUL C. GAY, 
Register. 
7/11-18-25/74 

COMMONWEALTH OF 

MASSACHUSETTS 

Norfolk, ss. Probate Court 

N0.74P1758 

To all persons interested in the 
estate of DOROTHY E. RAE late of 
Quincy in said County, deceased. 

A petition has been presented to 
said Court praying that RONALD W. 
RAE of Quincy in the County of 
Norfolk be appointed administrator 
of said estate without giving a surety 
on his bond. 

If you desire to object thereto you 
or your attorney should file a written 
appearance in said Court at Dedham 
before ten o'clock in the forenoon on 
Aug. 21, 1974, the return day of this 
eitatJDn. 

Witness, ROBERT M. FORD, 
1 squire, First Judge of said Court, 
this July 10, 1974. 

PAUL C. GAY, 
Register. 
7/18-25 8/1/74 



COMMONWEALTH OF 

MASSACHUSETTS 

Norfolk, ss. Probate Court 

No. 74P1765 

To all persons interested in the 
estate of EDWARD H. MacNEAL 
late of Quincy in said County, 
deceased. And to the Attorney 
General of said Commonwealth, if 
required. 

A petition has been presented to 
said Court for probate of a certain 
instrument purporting to be the last 
will of said deceased by MARY R. 
MacNEAL of Quincy in the County 
of Norfolk praying that she be 
appointed executrix thereof without 
giving a surety on her bond. 

If you desire to object thereto you 
or your attorney should file a written 
appearance in said Court at Dedham 
before ten o'clock in the forenoon on 
Aug. 21, 1974, the return day of this 
citation. 

Witness, ROBERT M. Ford, 
Esquire, First Judge of said Court, 
this July 10,1974. 

PAUL C. GAY, 
Register. 
7/18-258/1/74. 



For Home 
Delivery 

Call 
471S100 



Save Gas and Money 
shop locally 



COMMONWEALTH OF 

MASSACHUSETTS 

Norfolk, ss. Probate Court 

No. 74D0882 

To WILLIAM D. O'LEARY of 
Parts Unknown. 

A libel has been presented to said 
Court by your wife ANN S. 
O'LEARY praying that a divorce 
from the bond of matrimony 
between herself and you be decreed 
for the cause of desertion and 
praying for alimony and for custody 
and allowance for minor children. 

If you desire to object thereto, 
you or your attorney should file a 
written appearance in ^id Court at 
Dedham within twenty-one days 
from Sept. 25, 1974, the return day 
of this citation. 

Witness, ROBERT M. FORD, 
Esquire, First Judge of said Court, 
June 26, 1974. 

PAUL C. GAY, 
Register. 
7/3-11-18/74 

COMMONWEALTH OF 

MASSACHUSETTS 

Norfolk, ss. Probate Court 

No. 74P1610 

To all persons interested in the 
estate of VONIE I. BARNES late of 
Quincy, in said County, deceased. 

A petition has been presented to 
said Court for probate of a certain 
instrument purporting to be the last 
will of said deceased by AGNES A. 
BRADLEY of North Miami, in the 
State of Florida, praying that she be 
appointed executrix thereof without 
giving a surety on her bond. 

If you desire to object thereto you 
or your attorney should file a written 
appearance in said Court at Dedham 
before ten o'clock in the forenoon on 
July 31, 1974, the return day of this 
citation. 

Witness, ROBERT M. FORD, 
Esquire, First Judge of said Court, 
this June 24, 1974. 

PAUL C. GAY, 
Register. 
7/3-11-18/74 






.<^I%^ 




^'^yourW*^ 




THE 

MASSACHUSETTS MEDICAL 

SOCIETY 

Z2THC FENWAY BOSTON MASSACHUSETTS 0??15 8" S36Wt; 



ACT NOW 

Join the oldest Toy & Gift Party 
Plan in the Country - our 27th 
Year! Commissions up to 30%. 
Free Sample Kit. Call or write 
SANTA'S Parties, Avon, Conn. 
06001. Tel. 1 [2031 673-3455. 

ALSO BOOKING PARTIES 
7/25 

LEGAL NOTICES 

COMMONWEALTH OF 

MASSACHUSETTS 

Norfolk, ss. Probate Court 

No. 74P1035 

To all persons interested in the 
estate of HELEN M. SMITH late of 
Quincy in said County, deceased, 
testate. And to the Attorney General 
of said Commonwealth, if required. 

A petition has been presented to 
said Court for license to sell at 
private sale certain real estate of said 
deceased which is situated in said 
Quincy, in accordance with the offer 
set out in said petition. 

If you desire to object thereto you 
or your attorney should file a written 
appearance in said Court at Dedham 
before ten o'clock in the forenoon on 
July 31, 1974, the return day of this 
citation. 

Witness, ROBERT M. FORD, 
Esquire, First Judge of said Court, 
this June 26, 1974. 

PAUL C. GAY, 
Register. 
7/3-11-18/74 

COMMONWEALTH OF 

MASSACHUSETTS 

Norfolk, ss. Probate Court 

No. 74D0910 

To ROBERT J. EASTWOOD of 
2811 Fairpark Blvd. Little Rock, 
Arkansa. 

A libel has been presented to said 
Court by your wife JEANNITTE S. 
EASTWOOD praying that a divorce 
from the bond of matrimony 
between herself and you be decreed 
for the cause of cruel and abusive 
treatment. 

If you desire to object thereto, 
you or your attorney should file a 
written appearance in said Court at 
Dedham within twenty-one days 
from Aug. 7, 1974, the return day of 
this citation. 

Witness, ROBERT M. FORD, 
Esquire, First Judge of said Court, 
this June 28, 1974. 

PAUL C. GAY, 
Register. 
7/3-11-18/74 



%«St^< 



\ART FLOOR CO., Inc. 

cr^te the EMood Mrith . . . 

LINOLEUM 

(f TILE 

KENTILE • AMTICO • ARMSTRONG 

CONGOLEUM 

SOLD and INSTALLED 

HARDWOOD FLOORS, LAID & REFINISHED by our SPECIALISTS 
Complete Line of Ceramic tile • Carpeting 

dial . . . 328-6970 

115 SM«mOfe ^t, NORTH QUINCY 




LICENSED 
ELECTRICIAN 

Douglas W. Mason Jr. No job too 
small. Free Estimates. CaH 
328-5743 anytime. 

7/25 

KEYS MADE 

Locksmith on Duty 

GRANITE CITY 

HARDWARE 

1617 Hancock St., Quincy 

479-5454 



T.F. 



LOST PASSBOOK 



The following Passbook No. 118617 
has been lost, destroyed or stolen and 
application for payment has been 
made in accordance with Section 20, 
Chapter 167, General Laws. The 
finder will please return to the 
Granite Coop Bank, 121 Granite St., 
Quincy. 
7/11-18/74 



GENERAL CONTRACTORS 
MORAN & SONS 

Roofs, Porches, Gutters and 
Painting. All work guaranteed. 
FHA approved. Bonded & 
Insured. Free estimates. 

265-1426 or 471-1725. 

7/25 

SUNSHINE PAINT CO. 

Does your house need painting? 
Why pay the ridiculous prices of 
professionals when we guarantee a 
profession job for less. We are 
experienced and insured painters 
and can beat any professional 
price. Call Jack 328-4546. 

7/25 

FOR SALE 



MATTRESSES 



MATTRESSES - Immediate 
Delivery. Can you use 
exceptionally good buys on king, 
queen, full or twin mattresses, 
beds, trundles, bunks at discount. 
Brand names. Sealy, Eclipse, 
Slumberland, Englander, etc. 
Bedding has been our only 
business for over 20 years. Open 
eves.. Siesta Sleep Shops, 221 
Parkingway, Quincy, Corner of 
School -Street. 

T.F. 




TREE WORK 

Compare our prices. Work 
guaranteed. Call 

335-7675 

331-3741 7/25 

CARPENTRY 

Licensed builder, 26 years 
experience. Repairs, remodeling & 
additions. No job too small. Free 
estimate. Charles J. Ross, 
479-3755. j.F. 

HALL FOR RENT 

North Quincy K. of C. Building, 5 
HoUis Ave. For information 
Please call 

328-5552- 328-0087 
328-9822 t.f. 

HALLS FOR HIRE 

Weddings - showers - meetings - 
banquets. Elks Home, 1220 
Hancock St., Quincy, 

472-2223. t.f. 

- '■ ■ ' - ' '» ' - ■ 

CHILD CARE 

Rent-A-Parent. Young married 
South Shore couples will care for 
your home and children while 
you enjoy your vacation. 
Interviews and References 
available. 

UNIVERSITY 
HOME SERVICES 
961-1616 RANDOLPH 
449-3590 NEEDHAM 
t.f. 

ARCHIE'S LAWN 
MOWER SERVICE 

Guarantee Quality Work. Honest 
Prices. No job too small. Free 
Estimates. 92 South Central 
Avenue, Wollaston. 472-8675. 
8/29 

INSURANCE 

HOME OWNERS RATES ARE 
LOWER: If you have a basic 
Homeowner's policy for $20,000 
and are paying more than $62.00 
a year, call 282-4412 at once. 
Rutstein Insurance Agency. T.F. 



Index for 
Classified 

A Services 

B For Sale 

C Autos 

D Boats 

E For Rent 

F Help Wanted 

G Pets, Livestock 

H. Lost and Found 

I Real Estate for Sale 

J Real Estate Wanted 

K Miscellaneous 

L Work Wanted 

M Antiques 

N Coins and Stamps 

O Rest Homes 

P Instruction 




MAIL TO: QUINCY SUN 1601 Hancock St., Quincy 02169 
WANT ADS PAYABLE IN ADVANCE...ca8h must accompany order 
Enclosed " f^- the following ad to "«" times 



COPY: 



lUtet: 
Coq^tiict nte: 



$2.50 for one week, up to 20 word, 54 each additional word. 
$2.25 per week, up to 20 words for three or more insertions of 

the same ad. 
10 Consecutive issues $2.00 per week 
No refund will be made at this contract rate in the event of 

cancellation. 

Deadline: Friday 5 P.M. for the following weeks publication. 
Please'include your phone number in ad. 



••• 



iM 



Pi|« 32 Quincy Sun Thundiy, July 18, 1»74 

Due Back To Work Today 



Shipyard Workers Get $1.48 Hour Hike, Other Benefits 



By JAMES COLLINS 

Some 1,700 production 
workers were scheduled to 
return to their jobs at the 
General Dynamics Quincy 
Shipyard today [Thursday] 
ending a 123-day strike. 

A new three-year contract 
calling for a $1.48 an hour 
across-the-board pay hike over 
three years, other increases and 
benefits, was expected to be 
ratified by members of Local 5 
at a meeting Wednesday at 
North Quincy High School. 

Acceptance was 
recommended by the executive 
board of Local 5 [AFL-CIO]. 

'if we didn't think it was a 
good contract we would not 
recommend its ratification," said 
an apparently pleased Arthur 
Batson, president of Local 5. 

The strike, one of the longest 
in the yard's history, cost the 
Quincy-South Shore area 
economy millions of lost dollars, 
federal mediators estimate. 

The new three-year agreement 
become effective today. 

The first year calls for: 

• An 88 cent per hour 
across-the-board pay hike. 

• A 60 cent per hour increse 
for semi-skilled second class, 
third class and beginners. 



• A three-week vacation for 
1 years of service. [ Retroactive 
for all 10-year employees] 

• Pension benefit increased 
from $4 to $7 for past and 
future service. 

• Pension credits for the 
period of the work stoppage will 
be restored on the basis "of two 
months credits for each month 
worked following return to 
work. 

• Early retirement age 60-65 
with 10 years of service [no 
early retirements for first 30 
days following return to work]. 

• Disability retirement - $7 
per year of service [10 years 
required.] [No reductions for 
Social Security Disability.] 

• Holidays - [1] The 
company must pay holiday pay 
to employees laid off in the 
work week prior to and during 
the work-week in which a 
holiday occurs. [2] Holidays 
will include shift bonus for 
second and third shift employees 
if employee was assigned to 
night shift immediately 
preceding the holiday. 

• Additional funeral days and 
relatives. 

• Thirty months additional 
recall rights. 



• $10 increase accident and 
sickness schedule. 

• $200 per family major 
medical deductible. 

• 365 day semi-private 
hospital coverage. 

• Coordination of benefits 
(Basic Plan with other group 
insurance]. 

• Insurance coverage 
immediately upoa ratification. 

• Two additional years on 
sick leave of absence. 

• Elimination of unskilled 
rates. 

Second year effective July 20, 
1975: 

• Thirty cent per hour 
increase across the board. 

9 $5. increase accident and 
sickness schedule. 

• Two 1/2 holidays day 
before Christmas and New Year. 

• Increase life insurance from 
$6,500 to $8,500. 2 years plus 
30 days; from $5,500 to $7,000, 
1 year plus 30 days; from 
$4,000 to $5,000, 30 days. 

Third year effective July 18, 
1976: 

• Thirty cent per hour 
increase across the board. 

9 $5 increase accident and 
sickness schedule. 

9 Increase life insurance from 




"THANK GOD". i$ the niessage outlined by the paper cup$ on the 
fence of the Quincy Shipyard of General Dynamics near Fore River 
Bridge. Strike had ended for 1.700 production workers at the 
shipyard which has a backlog of shipbuilding orders which will 
ensure work for the next few years. 

[Quincy Sun Photo by Laban Whittakerl 



$8,500 to $10,000, 2 years plus 
30 days; from $7,000 to $8,000, 
1 year plus 30 days; from 
$5,000 to $5,500, 30 days. 



• Effective, Jan. 31, 1977: 
Mandatory retirement at age 65 - 
no service requirement for 
pension. 



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SALES 1570 HANCOCK ST., QUINCY 479-1350 SERVICE 



inoirias Crane Public Library 
B?x 379 ^ 

9,uincy, Mass. O2169 




Vol. 6 No. 45 
Thursday, July 25, 1974 



2tcHe^'* Oum TC/eeii^ 7lnMfi€kp€% 



■"> 




i 




mm- iif' :^ w 


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/7i 






WINNER TO BE, Janice Lamparelli, 18, cut a pretty figure along runway in swimsuit competition 
during Miss Quincy Bay Race Week Pageant in front of Hancock Bank. A crowd estimated at more than 
4,000 jammed downtown area to see the event. 



PRETTY PICTURE - Janice Lamparelli, 18, of West Quincy, does 
indeed make a pretty picture after being crowned Miss Quincy Bay 
Race Week of 1974. 



(Stories On Page 16) 




HAPPINESS IS being declared Miss Quincy Bay Race Week of 1974 as 18-year old 
Janice Lamparelli shows here. And happy for her are Debbi King, 18, [left] and Laura 
Sorgi, 17, both of Braintree who were among the 10 finalists. 



HANDSOME TROPHY from Quincy Center Business and Professional Association is 
presented to winner Janice Lamparelli by Pageant Chairman Henry Bosworth [right] 
of The Quincy Sun as Emcee Kenneth P. Fallon Jr., of WJDA looks on. Behind them is 
fourth runnerup Judith Owens, 21, of Whitman. 




FIRST RUNNERUP Janet McConarty, 16, of Merrymount is a picture of young 
beauty as she is escorted along runway by Edward Simpson, past commodore 
-Squantum Yacht Club and Secretary of the Quincy Bay Race VVeek Association, 
during evening gown competition. 



KIM AFFSA, 18, of Braintree answers question as one of the 10 finalists in MQBRW 
pageant. Other finalists shown are fourth runnerup Judith Owens, 21, third runnerup 
Pamela Mills, 17, first runnerup Janet McConarty, 16, winner Janice Lamparelli, 18, 
Debbi King, 19, Barbara Ann Holder, 19, second runnerup Rossana DiCenso, 18 and 
Joanne Cirino, 16. At right is emcee Kenneth P. Fallon Jr. of WJOA. 



Page 2 Quincy Sun Thursday, July 25, 1974 




Published vjeekly on Thursday by 

The Quincy Sun Publishing Company 

1601 Hancock St., Quincy, Massachusetts 02169 

Pubhsher and Editor 

Henry W. Bosworth, Jr. 

Advertising Director 

John B. Powers 

1 0^ Per Copy - $4.00 Per Year - Out of State S5 .00 Per Year 

Telephone: 471-3100 471-3101 471-3102 

Second-Class Postage Paid at Boston, Mass. 

MEMBER NEW ENGLAND PRESS ASSOCIATION 

The Quincy Sun assumes no financial responsibility for 
typographical errors in advertisements but will reprint that part of 
an advertisement in which the typographical error occurs. 



Lydon Seeks To Break Up 
Gangs On Whitwell St. 




Ward 3 Councillor John J. 
Lydon is asking cooperation 
from the Police and Park 
Departments io breaking up 
gangs of youths "drinking and 
disturbing the peace" on 
Whitwell St. 

LydoiJ said the youths are 
gathering in the wooded area 
which surrounds the Whitwell 
St. playground. 



He asked the Police 
DefpaJtment tb triake more 
frequent checks of the area. 

And, he asked Richard J. 
Koch, executive secretary of the 
Park-Recreation Board to "thin 
out" the heavy brush "so that 
when the police are patrolling 
the area, they will be able to see 
more readily if any gangs are 
gathering." 



ALLIGATOR U.center of attention during Children's Zoomobile visit at fifth annual Quincy Sidewalk 



Bazaar. 



HEW Awards $30,548 To QCA 



Merchants Eye Next Year 

Sidewalk Bazaar Business 
Estimated Up 35 Per Cent 



Congressman James A. Burke 
(D-MiltonJ announces that the 
Department of Health, 

Education and Welfare is 
awarding $30,548 to the Quincy 



Community Action Organization 
in Quincy. 

The funds will be used to 
provide preschool training for 
children on a part day basis for a 
period of eight months. 



Business during Quincy's fifth 
annual Sidewalk Bazaar 
generally was up an estimated 35 
per cent over last year. 

The estimate is from Mark 
Bertman, president of the 
Quincy Center Business and 



Social Security Recipients 

Disabled Veterans 

Service Personnel ^ 

Government Employees 

Federal Retirees 



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an automatic deposit to a 

Colonial Federal savings 

or N.O.W. account. 



For complete details about automatic 

deposits and N.O.W. Accounts, 
please visit our Wollaston Office at 
15 Beach Street, or call Bill Bowen 
or David Mercier at 471-075Q 

lopen Monday through Friday 8 AM to 6 PmI 
Thursday 8 AM to 7:30 PM 



2fvolonial Federal Savings 

and loan Asvociation ol (^uin(v 



802 S'. f-a-*' -S- 



Professional Association and 
owner of Rogers Jewelry who 
noted: 

"That's a safe figure. It was a 
super Thursday, a good Friday, 
and a good Saturday for some 
merchants. I did hear a few 
complaints about Saturday's 
business." 

William Woskie, manager of 
Sears Roebuck, said his bazaar 
business increased 20 to 25 per 
cent over. last year's sales. 

"We did very well," he said. 
"I was most impressed every 
time I walked onto the street." 

Woskie added, "The bazaar 
was more welUorganized than 
last year's and there were more 
activities this year." 

Mrs. Rose Salhaney, owner of 
Big J Lunch, described her 
business as "unbelievable. ..fabu- 
lous." 

"The smartest thing they ever 
did was to clo-se down Hancock 
St.," she commented. "My 
business was twice as good as 
last year's. People were able iu 
walk around more freely. They 
took their time." 

Ted Johnson of Granite City 
Hardware called his business 
"great." 

"It was the best year so far," 
he said. "The crowds were bigger 
than previous years and there 
were more activities near the 
store. I'll be happy to have it 
again next year." 

Burt Cook of Tag's Sleep and 
Lounge Shop called his sales "as 
good as last year, if not better." 
He praised the bazaar as "a very 
successful, well-run job." 

Cook added that there were 
more people on the streets this 
year. "Saturday' was the key," 
he noted. "We held people in the 
store until late in the afternoon. 
Usually things slow down 
around 3 o'clock." 

Bertman said that business at 
Rogers Jewelry more than 
doubled over last year. 

"The first two days were 
extremely strong with Saturday 
a little slower. But more people 
seemed to be interested in what 
was going on at the bazaar this 
year." 

Bertman said that Thursday's 
sales at Rogers exceeded their 
total business during last year's 
three-day festival. 

Remo DeNicola of South 
Shore Television and Appliance 
mused, "We're still trying to put 
the store back in order from the 
bazaar." 

"It was the best one so far. 
Action usually sloWs dowii at 3 
o'clock on Saturday, but t^ 
couldn't close until after 5:30. . 



There were customers still in the 
store." 

Jerry Morreale of Child World 
also reported very good business 
even though his merchandise 
totaled only half the volume of 
last year's. 

"My own figures weren't 
tremendous," he said, "but 
considering the amount of 
merchandise 1 had and 
considering what I sold, the 
crowds just had to be there." 

Morreale also commented on 
crowd personality: "The 
enthusiasm was fantastic. More 
people were not only buying but 
enjoying the festivities as well. 
That's a good sign." 

Both Donald Duck and 
Mickey Mouse tricycled up and 
down in front of Child World. 
Morreale said, "It worked out 
well and added a lot for the kids. 
. People even came back with 
cameras the second and third 
days to take pictures of their 
kids with Mickey Mouse and 
Donald Duck. This was good 
because it brought a lot of • 
people back to Quincy Sq." 

Business was "not bad" at 
Donaher's Men Store. Hank 
Donaher said. "We did a little 
better than last year, moving a 
lot of shirts and small items." 

Jack Kerrigan of 
Baskin-Robbins Ice Cream 
reported very good business. 
"With the luck of the weather 
and with good streaks of 
consistent business, we did very 
well," he said. 

"There was "community 
involvement this year - The 
Quincy High School Band, the 
Mothers Club of Houghs Neck, 
St. Boniface Church. People are 
sure there wOl be a crowd and 
they are willing to make a 
serious investment of time and 
money." 

Jason Feldman of Jason's 
Luggage and Music Shop is 
already looking forward to next 
year's bazaar. 

"Sales were up about 20 per 
cent from last year," he said. 
"And the crowds were larger and 
stayed longer in the streets 
because the road was blocked 
off. People could walk around 
leisurely. I'm looking forward to 
next year." 

Booths and concession stands 
rented by various organizations 
and groups did a brisk business, 
too. 

The Quincy Youth 
Association, for example, sold 
an estimated 4,000 hot dogs. 
And the Q^incy Kivvanis Club 
'Sold 'oveT.;h50 pounds of 



petaufe, arid tan out "'^^ 



Thursday, July 25, 1974 Quincy Sun Page 3 



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Page 4 Quincy Sun Thursday, July 25, 1974 




POURING PUNCH at the Quincy Historical Society's annual open house and tea at the Presidents 
Adams birthplaces is Mrs. H. Hobart Holly, wife of the society's president. From left are Harry Belcher 
and John Benoit, oast presidents of the Weymouth Historical Society, Mr. Holly, Gordon Nelson and 
Fred Bergfors Jr., members of the Board of Curators and Mrs. Nelson. 

Abp. Williams Planning 25th Anniversary 



Parents, faculty, alumni and 
students of Archbishop Williams 
High School are now beginning 
to plan activities to celebrate the 
25th anniversary of the founding 
of the school. 

Plans include activities 
thrcaghout the entire school 
year, but the big celebration will 
take place during the 
Thanksgiving week-end. That 
weekend was selected because 
Alumni away at college would 
be at home during this holiday 
break, and others married and 
moved away would possibly be 
back in the area for family 
reunions at that time. 

Beginning on Thanksgiving 
morning, a pancake breakfast 



will be served in the school 
cafeteria, sponsored by the 
Men's Association. Following 
the breakfast, the final football 
game of the season will be 
played at the Archbishop 
Williams Memorial Field. 
Opponents will be Xaverian of 
Westwood. 

A parade from the school to 
the stadium will precede the 
game, and after the game is over 
p /cry one is free to go home for 
heir turkey dinners and rest up 
for the dinner dance to be held 
the following evening, Friday, 
Nov. 29, tentatively scheduled at 
Lantana in Randolph. 

• Committee members are Nick 
Pepe, chairman of the Advisory 



Board; Robert Quinn of 
Holbrook; Frank Celino of 
Marshfield; Mrs. Edward Percy 
of Weymouth; Mrs. Joseph 
Garrity of Quincy; Mrs. Paul 
Kelly of Quincy and Mrs. 
Herbert Phillips of Braintree. 
Representing the students at a 
recent planning meeting were 
Joe Pemental and Kerri Phillips 
of Braintree. Sister Catherine 
Looby, principal, and Sister 
Maria Jude, director of public 
relations, represented the 
faculty. 

Alumni and friends who are 
interested in joining to help 
make the anniversary observance 
a memorable one are urged to 
contact any of the above 
members. 



5 Quincy Artists To Exhibit At Scituate Festival 



Five QuinCy residents vv'ill 
display their work at the 7th 
Annual Scituate Arts Festival 
sponsored by the Scituate Arts 
Association July 24-28. 
■ Paul Fortin of 134 School St., 
Quincy, placed second in recent 
J'uried Photography 
competition. The freelance 
photographer submitted a black 
and white untitled print of the 
dunes in Provincetown. His prize 
was $25. 

Doris Ferrara of 9 Aberdeen 
Rd, Squantum received an 



honorable mention for a mixed 
medium painting. 

Richard Seron of 15 Ferriter 
St., West Quincy will display a 
color photograph entitled "The 
Brink of Eternity". The print 
pictures tombstones on a hillside 
cemetery silhouetted against a 
pale green ocean. 

Leslie E. Levine of 1374 
Quincy Shore Drive will display 
two photographs: one black and 
white, the other color. 
"Daybreak", the color print, 
captures a winter sunrise over 



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Jenne Farm in Vermont. The 
sun's first rays filter over the 
horizon, shedding a^ red glow 
over the land. 

Her second photograph, 
"Stariings at Dusk", is a high 
contrast, black and white shot of 
a flock of starlings perched on a 
tree near Fore River Bridge. 

Dennis M. Grant of 1 1 
Glenview Rd, Quincy Point, will 
display a black and white print 
entitled "Woods No. 1". It 
pictures pine trees lining a 
forked dirt road and an eerie 
light filters down through the 
trees. 

The Scituate Arts Festival is 
located at Central School, 
Branch St., Scituate and is open 
to the public from July 24-28. 
Browsing hours are from 1 1 a.m. 
to 10 p.m. On July 28, the 
festival will end at 6 p.m. 

The festival will also feature 
performing artists competition. 
Best dramatic performer, most 
entertaining performer and best 
non-adult performer will each 
receive $50. 

The competition, open to 
performing arts organizations, 
individuals or groups, will take 
place on July 27 at 3 p.m. for 
those under 18. Adult auditions 
will be held at a time and place 
to be announced. 




MARRIED - Mr. and Mrs. Matthew M. Ivit Jr. were married recently 
in St. Ann's Church, Quincy. She Is the former Claire Mary Cifuni, 
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Salvatore Cifuni of 257 Adams St., Quincy. 
He is the son of Mr. and Mrs. Matthew M. Ivll of 128 McGrath 
Highway, Quincy. Mrs. Ivll is a graduate of Fontbonne Academy for 
Girls and Aquinas Junior College. She is employed as a bookkeeper 
at American Associates In Dorchester. Mr. Ivll is a graduate of 
Quincy High School and Acadia University. He is employed as 
manager of South Shore Television and Appliance in Quincy. After a 
wedding trip to Bermuda the couple are living in Wollaston. 

[Boris of Boston] 

Granite City Grange 
Planning Installation 



Granite City Grange will 
install new officers Monday, 
Sept. 23, at 8 p.m. 

The officers include Sadie 
Wesley, Master; Thomas Feeley, 
Qverseer; Theodore Johnson, 
Lecturer; John McCabe, 
Steward; Melvin Wesley, 
Assistant Steward; Christine 
Curiey, Assistant Steward; Edith 
Purpura, Chaplain; Pauline 
Sullivan, Treasurer; Mary 
Johnson, Secretary; HUma Nord, 
Gatekeeper; Ethel Pearson, 
Ceres; Mabel Thain, Pomona; 
Gladys Celedonio, Flora; 
Beatrice David, Pianist; and 
Mary Berry, Executive 
Committee for a three year 
term. 

Special guests will be John 
Zampine, Blue Hills Pomona 
representative; Joyce Loud, 
State Pomona representative; 
Howard Hayward, State 
Conservation representative; 
Mrs. Ellen Williamson, 
Master-Elect of Braintree 
Grange; Mrs. Mary Hayward, 
Master of Ponkapoag Grange; 
Herbert Kendall, Master-Elect of 
Blue Hills Pomona Grange; and 
Mrs. M. Johnson, Master-Elect of 
Saugus Grange. 

The annual Lecturers' 
Conference will be held Aug. 19 
to the 24th at the University of 
New Hampshire in Buriington. 
N.H. 



Births 




At Quincy City Hospital 

July 14 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert Souza, 
26 Fifth Ave., a daughter. 

July 17 

Mr. and Mrs. Antonio- 
DeSantis, 32 Freeman St., a son. 

At St. Margaret's Hospital 

July 8 

Mr. and Mrs. Philip Clark, 21 
Pray St., a daughter. 

July 1 1 

Mr. and Mrs. Timothy 
Kerrissey, 16 Ellington Road, a 
daughter. 

Mr. and Mrs. James Fennessy, 
15 Bailey St., a son. 

July 1 1 

Mr. and Mrs. Frank Trainor, 
80 Palmer St., a son. 

July 13 

Mr. and Mrs. George 
DeLegore, 19 Botolph St., a son. 




Newest 
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Thursday, July 25 , 1974 Quincy Sun Page 5 




ENGAGED - Mrs. Russell J. Barry of 20 Salem St., West Quincy, 
announces the engagement of her daughter Donna Marie to Stephen 
F. Sloat, son of Mr. and Mrs. Everett C. Sloat of 95 Highland St., 
Milton. Donna is also the daughter of the late Mr. Russell J. Barry. 
She is a graduate of Quincy High School and is employed by the 
New England Telephone Co. in Boston. Mr. Sloat is a graduate of 
Norfolk County Agricultural High School and he attended New 
York University at Cobleskill for two years. He is now employed at 
Powissett Farm in Dover. A September wedding is planned. 

[The Nourses] 

Poolside Party For 
St. John's Junior League 



It wUl be "Everybody into the 
pool!" Saturday, July 27, at the 
home of Mr. ahd ' Mrs. Carl 
Bersani, 35 O'Connell Ave., West 
Quincy, as St. John's Junior 
League opens its social season 
with a gala poolside party. 

Cocktails will be served at 
7:30 p.m. followed by a 
charcoal steak dinner prepared 
by Mr. Bersani, Fred Walsh and 
Joseph Abbott. Guests may then 
enjoy dancing under the stars on 
the flower bedecked patio, or a 
dip in the spacious, heated pool. 
Proceeds from the party will go 
to the League's scholarship fund. 

In addition to the host and 
hostess, members of the 



committee include co-hostess 
Mrs. James Triglia, Mrs. 
Frederick Walsh, Mrs. John 
Morrison, Mrs. John Jolley, Mrs. 
Lawrence Forte, Mrs. Joseph 
Abbott, Mrs. Ferdinand 
DeNicola, Mrs. Frank Lomano, 
Mrs. Richard Storella, and Mrs. 
Anthony Aimola. 

Mrs. Frederick Walsh, 
President, said the league is 
planning a busy and productive 
season, including a silver 
anniversary celebration, several 
candy sales, a progressive dinner, 
fashion show, "Girl's Night 
Out", and Communion 
breakfast. 



Sons Of Italy To Host 250 OP 



The Quincy Sons of Italy, 
Lodge 1295, Quincy, is 
sponsoring its second annual full 
course catered Italian dinner for 
250 Cerebral Palsy adults and 
their companions Sunday, Aug. 
25 at 1 p.m. at the lodge social 
hall, 120 Quarry St. 

John A. Bersani, chairman of 
the dinner committee, said there 
will also be entertainment. 

The Quincy Sons of Italy 
Lodge was established 50 years 
ago as a non-profit organization 
and has been sponsoring dinners 
and social events for the 



mentally retarded, the 
underprivileged and the cerebral 
palsied. The lodge also provides 
scholarships, camperships and 
other charitable endeavors as 
part of its community service. 

Every C.P. adult in the South 
Shore 'Area is invited to attend 
and those who require assistance 
may bring one or two 
companions to help in feeding 
and transportation. Further 
information may be obtained by 
contacting CF Headquarters, 105 
Adams St., Quincy [479-7443]. 



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Marriage 
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Eric E. Johnson, 137 Sea 
Ave., Quincy, student; Denise M. 
Janis, 1 396 Quincy Shore Drive, 
Quincy, secretary. 

AUan L. Wiener, 18 
Grandview Ave., Quincy, 
student; Ann E. Durkin, 18 
Grandview Ave., Quincy, 
accounting clerk. 

Scott W. Brown, 18 Ellery St., 
Cambridge, student; Mary M. 
Pearson, 54 Ames St. Quincy, 
registered nurse. 

John A. Sibert, 59 Winthrop 
Ave., Quincy, truck ' driver; 
Elizabeth S. Bonner, 259 
Norfolk St., Cambridge, clerk. 

Albert F. Regele Jr., 65 Colby 
Rd, Quincy, parts sales; Gay M. 
Bergeron, 370 Plymouth St., 
Abington, teacher. 

Michael R. Burgess, 43 Terne 
Rd, Quincy, teacher; Deborah A. 
Inmar, 17 Forbush Ave., 
Quincy, retailer. 

Paul D. Beatrice, 224 
Whitwell St., Quincy, art 
director; Deborah A. Towers, 
237 Water St., Quincy, 
secretary. 




ELECTED - Miss Frances 
McDonald of 50 Baker Aw., 
Quincy, has been elected first 
woman president of the Catholic 
Alumni Club of Boston for the 
1974-75 term. She is one of only 
three women to hold the honor 
among 61 club chapters in the 
U.S. The 350-member Boston 
chapter is the largest headed by 
a woman. 

May Hogan On 
Lesley Alumni Board 

May Hogan of 585 Sea St., 
Quincy, has been elected to a 
three-year term on the Board of 
Directors of the Lesley College 
Alumni Association. 

Miss Hogan served previously 
as Regional Representative to 
Lesley Alumni in the 
Milton-Quincy area and 
participated in the Dialathon for 
the 1971-72 Annual Giving 
Program. 



PERIV.ANENT 
REMOVAL 



UNWANTED 



JX 



MARLENE 
MELAMEt) R.E. 

Registered and Licensed 
Electrologist 
1151 Hancock St. 
Quincy 
By Appointment only 

Call 773-1330 
formi:rly 

FRKDKRICK .S. HILL 




MARRIED ~ Mrs. John J. Ginty is the former Janice Marie Doyle, 
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Robert H. Doyle of 50 Winslow Rd, 
Squantum. Her husband is the son of Mrs. Edward Ginty of 
Roslindale. They were married at the Star of the Sea Church, 
Squantum. The bride is a graduate of North Quincy High School and 
the groom attended Boston College High School. After a wedding 
trip to Bermuda, the couple will live in Quincy. Both Mr. and Mrs. 
Ginty are employed by The Boston Globe. 

[Robert B. Gorrill Photo] 

S.S. Emmanuel Club 
Installs Officers 



At a recent board meeting, 
the South Shore Emmanuel Club 
installed new officers. They are: 

Co-chairmen Mrs. William 
Gean, Hingham and Mrs. 
Gregory Hrch, Hingham; 
treasurer, Mrs. John Biggs, 
Duxbury; secretary, Mrs. Paul 
Scarlata, Stoughton; publicity, 
Mrs. John F. O'Donoghue Jr., 
Scituate; condolences, Miss 
Sybill Turner, MUton. 

Scholarships have been 



awarded to .two incoming 
freshmen, Theresa Bradley, 32 
Lancaster St., Quincy Point, and 
Mary Ellen Dever, 13 Windsor 
Drive, Hirigham. 

I DERRINGER I 

THE FLORIST 

Plants Arrangements Flowers 
389 HANCOCK ST. 773-0959 



TIMEX 



® 



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In and Out-of Warranty Watches Repaired 

Genuine TIMEX Energy Cells available 



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Jewelers 



1402 HANCOCK STREET 
773-6340 



QUINCY 



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'^■^ FOR A i 
XX FUNFILLED£^ 
"^^^ SUMMER!-^ 



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Come visit with our experienced personnel for the 
NEW Summer look - We're streaking to change your 
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MONTH OF JULY SPECIALS 



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FROSTING . STREAKING Mniiii ^-1 O 

Reg. $20. iOWi;^!^ 



RUSSELL EDWARDS 

27 COTTAGE AVE.. QUINCY 472-1500 472-9544 

Appointments or Walk-in service - Open Thursday evenings 



Page 6 Quincy Sun Thursday, July 25. 1974 



PERSONAL 

Should she wear bra? 



By PAT and 
MARILYN DAVIS 

Dear Pat and Marilyn: 

My mother refuses to wear 
a bra. It wouldn't be so bad if 
Mom had a nice thin figiu'e, 
but she is 5 feet 2 and weighs 
ISO pounds. 

I've talked with her and all 
she says is, "I'm comfortable 
and at my age that's what 
counts." What can I do? 

'Sjie 

Dear Sue: 

Not mudi. Maybe some of 
our readers will have a sug- 
gestion. 

Dear Pat and Marilyn: 

As for the letter about the 
boy yrbo doesn't want to at- 
tend his father's alma mater 
— you said he should be al- 
lowed to choose the school he 
wishes to attend. Vou're a tiig 
lie^. Parents pay «> why 
shouldn't they have the say 
about where? Remember it is 
the mothers and fathers ^o 
are filling your nose bag. ^¥hy 
don't you he^ us? 

Ashamed of You 

Dear Ashamed: 

This boy wants to attend a 
local college because his 
father's choice is 3,000 miles 
from home. The boy felt that 
he is not able to cope with 
being so far away plus the 
competition of a large cam- 
pus. 

In my answer, I said: 
Perhaps your father would be 
happier if he thought you 
would consider his school af- 
ter two years at the junior col- 
lege. At that time, many stu- 
dents are better prepared to 
attend a large university. . 

N.O.W.: 

Getit 

from 
Colonial 
Federal. 

We've got it- 

the N.O.W. 
Account. 

It's better than a checking 
account because it pays 
interest from day of deposit to 
day of withdrawal — at 5% 
annually, compounded 
monthly. 

You can pay your bills with a 
N.O.W. Account by writing 
negotiable orders of 
withdrawal, making them 
payable to anyone— just like 
checks. 

Each draft you write costs only 
15 cents, and when they're 
cashed at Colonial Federal, 
they're free. 

N.O.W. For 
Experience. 

If you're 62 or older, Colonial 
Federal gives you N.O.W. For 
Experience — a free N.O.W. 
Account. 

Colonial 
^Federal 
1^ Savings 

And Loan Association 
of Quincy 

15 Beach Stieet 

Wollaston 

Tel. 471-0750 

Note: $10 must remain in 
^count to tw paid xxwwmix^ 



I appreciate your opinion 
but still feel my answer is cor- 
rect. If a student is homesick 
fearful, or under too much 
stress, his academic progress 
will suffer accordin^y. 

Dear Pat and Marilyn: 

I am 16 years old, a junior in 
high school, and doing well. 
My parents belong to several 
philanthropic organizations 
and devote 99 per cent of their 
free time to them. If I need to 
talk something over, I would 
have to make an appointment. 
They are never home. If they 
are, they are too busy creatr 
ing some fund-raising affair 
to talk with me. 

As an only child, I have al- 
ways been close to them but 
lately we are drifting apart. 
How can I get through to 
them? I need them now. > ' ' 
Orphan 

Dear Orphan: 

Show them the above letter. 
You said it all. 

Dear Pat and Marilyn: 

Yesterday my dog was 
poisoned. How could any sane 
person do such a thing? The 
dog didn't bark or run free. 
She was always in the back 
yard. Now the kids are crying 
and so am 1. We walked into 
the patio and found our dog 
dead. Our veterinarian con- 
firmed what we feared. Some- 
one had given her a piece of 
poisoned meat. If dropping 
meat into a back yard is the 
procedure this nut uses, some 
child could be poisoned. 
What can we do? 

Sad Family 

Dear Family: 

Contact your local SPCA 
and the police department in 
your city. I doubt that your 
dog is the only pet who has 
been poisoned in this cruel 
and inhumane manner. Keep 
an eye open for strangers 
strolling up and down the 
block. By all means, warn 
your children about picking 
up food — no matter what it is. 

I can't think of printable 
words to describe such a per- 
son. 



To-dciu'A Wo-rnen, 



ONCE OVER LIGHTLY 

Women confess their 



love 



By ANN RUDY 
Copley News Service 

The diet confession story is 
taking the place of the love 
confession st(N*y. 

Pick up any women's 
magazine and you'll find a 
lengthy article about how 
Jane, just an ordinary w(»n- 
•an, managed to overcome her 
magnificent obsession with 
chocolate cake or anything 
else she could lay her hands 
on. 

"When my husband left fw 
wcH-k in the morning," a typi- 
cal passage will read, "I tried 
not to thiidc about the bowl of 
left over spaghetti in the re- 
frigerator, but it was no use. I 
waited until the kids were out- 
side playing and then I ate the 
whole thing. No one knew, be- 
cause I broke the bowl and 
carefully wiped my mouth. 
But that afternoon I went 
back to the refrigerator and 
killed a leg of lamb I'd been 
saving for company. That's 
when I knew I needed help. It 
was raw." 

Then the reader goes with 
Jane through the agony and 
anguish of clandestine glut- 
tony. Stolen pizzas, furtive 
fritosand tremendous lunches 
in small, out-of-the-way cafes. 

In the end, of course, Jane 
realizes that her real happi- 
ness lies not in a bed of lettuce 
smothered in Roquefort 
dressing, but in the arms of 
Fred, her adoring husband. 
Fred forgives her for the two 
hundred pounds she put on, 
and she bravely shoves aside 
the extra eight meals a day 



We arc interested in PURCHASING 
& APPRAISING precious jewels. 

FREE CONSULTATION FOR PRIVATE 
OWNERS, BANKERS & ATTORNEYS 

Robert S. Freeman Certified Gemologist 

HARTS Jtwaltrs 




Call 773-2170 



1422 Hancock St, Quincy, Mass. 



"Ai*J^ 



■^"i •■■/SS'*^ 




of eating 




she's been eating — a sadder 
but wiser girl. 

Together, they resolve to 
live happily ever after and 
never mention the wooden 
spoon she bit in half during 
those mad and capricious two 
years of gourmet gallivantr 
ing. 



That's what comes of givmg 
up our Victorian mores. Sex 
has come out of the shadows 
and is now as wholesome as 
mom's apple pie. Mom's ap- 
ple pie, however, has become 
a no-no. Which only goes to 
prove, I suppose, that guilt is 
here to stay — any way you 
slice it. 



Happy Homemaking 

By BARBARA BAKER 



Washing or dry-cleaning 
will remove the lanolin from 
a Navajo rug and leave it 
lifeless. The best way to clean 
this type of rug is to lay it on a 
clean floor and vacuum thor- 
oughly on both sides. Make a 
thick suds of warm water and 
mild soap and use a brush to 
take up the suds, brushing 
across the weave a narrow 
band at a time. Wipe off the 
suds and dirt with a clean rag 
wrung out in clear water. Do 
not soak the rug. When the 
rug is clean, let it dry - 
preferably spread out in the 
sun. 



If you have 



a hard time 



PHOTO COURTESY OF THOMAS CRANE PUBLIC LIBRARY 



...the corner of Shaw Street 
and Washington Street Quincy 
Point looked like this? 



REMEMBER WHEN 

...You wore not just a Policy 
Number and retained your 
own identity, when personal 
service was always given ... It 
still is at ... 



BURGIN 

PLATNER 

INS. 

1357 Hancock Street, 
Quincy 472-3000 



removing old putty from 
around windows, soften the 
putty with a hot soldering 
iron. The putty should come 
off easily — a small strip at a 
time. 

The best way to avoid 
wrinkling your nylon cur- 
tains is to add starch to their 
•-inse water. When the cur- 
tains are left to dry on the 
line, they should be wrinkle 
free. 

If your pewter coffee pot 
has corroded inside, fill it 
with warm water and add a 
tablespoon of baking soda. 
Let stand until the pot is 
clean. 

Some things are 
cheaper nowadays 

Not everything is mwe ex- 
pensive than in the good old 
days. 

The average price of a room 
air conditioner in 1960, for ex- 
ample, was $275, according to 
the Association of Home k^ 
pliance Manufacturers. In 
1972 it was $219. — CNS 



RENTALS 




Adding Machine 
Copiers 
Typewriter!, 
Calculators 



FROM $10 MO/UP 

AMERICAN SCOTT 

227 PARKINGWAY 
Quincy: 773-3S28 



Your Horosco 



For ne Week Of July 2S-Ai«. 1 
By GINA, Copley News Servkc 

For more complete forecast, read indications for your 
Ascendant sign plus Birth si^n. To find your Ascendant sign, 
count ahead from Birth sign the number of signs indicated. 




Timr of Birth: 

4 to 6 a.m. 

6 to 8 a.m. 

8 to 10 a.m. 

10 to 12 Noon 

Noon to 2 p.m. 

2 to 4 p.m. 

4 to 6 p.m. 

6 to 8 p.m. 

8 to 10 p.m. 

10 to Midnight 

Midnight to 2 a.m. 

2 to 4 a.m. 



ARIES: (March 21 to April 

19 — Also Aries Ascendant) — 
Energy is high and you shine 
in the role of a director of ac- 
tivities. Projects go well — 
things fall into place. Your 
judgment is good if you re- 
main objective. An honor or 
award for past performance 
is possible. 

TAURUS: (April 20 to May 

20 — Also Taurus Ascendant) 
—Your intuition is heightened 
now. Improve your health by 
exercise and participation in 
sports. Be discreet in roman- 
tic matters. A secret, or be- 
hind-the-scenes attraction 
could become public and 
harm reputation. 

GEMINI: (May 21 to June 
20 — Also Gemini Ascendant) 

— (Ganges you considered 
some months ago could now 
happen. Make decisions and 
unify all your efforts. Be un- 
derstanding and less critical 
about domestic conditions. 
Take precautions against ac- 
cidents in the home. 

CANCER: (June 21 to July 
22 — Also Cancer Ascendant) 

— Follow your hunches. Fi- 
nancial gain from offering a 
service or product that is ac- 
cepted by one in authority. 



PruhabI*' AxrrndanI i»: 

Same as birth sign 

First sign following 

Second sign following 

Third sign following 

Fourth sign following 

Fifth sign following 

Sixth sign following 

Seventh sign following 

Eighth sign following 

Ninth sign following 

Tenth sign following 

Eleventh sign following 



Advertising is favored now, as 
are trips for business reasons. 
Use care while driving — con- 
centrate. 

L£0: (July 23 to Aug. 22 - 
Also Leo Ascendant) — Lots 
of excitement and action in 
entertainment areas this 
week. Seek cooperative effort 
on yoiu* projects instead of go- 
ing it alone. Use diplomacy 
and a sense of humor to gain 
harmony with family mem- 
bers. 

VIRGO: (Aug. 23 to Sept. 22 
— Also Virgo Ascendant) — 
Situations in your life appear 
to be beyond your control. Ac- 
cept others and their actions 
without emotionalism. Stick 
to routine and start nothing 
new. Finances may be a prob- 
lem but don't borrow or lend 
now. 

UBRA: (Sept. 23 to Oct. 22 
^::Also Libra Ascendant) — A 

friend can inspire you to some 
important understandings 
about yourself. Search your 
inner self for intuitive an- 
swers. Your past per- 
formance on the job could 
bring favorable notice now. 
Opportunities abound. 

SCORPIO: (Oct. 23 to Nov. 



Americans use a lot of water 



Each person in an Ameri- 
can home uses from 20 to 80 
gallons of water each day. 

Much of this is used in tak- 



ing baths (30 to 40 gallons) or 
showers (20 to 30 gallons), but 
four to six gallons is literally 
dumped down the drain every 
time a toilet is flushed. — CNS 



uide 



Tliuncl>y,Jiily25, l974QuiiK!ySunP«ge7 

CELEBRITY SCRIPTS 



21 — )4^l*o Scorpio Ascendant) 
—Catch op on ttiingsyou have 
let slide at wori^. Resist pro- 
crastination. Gb over ac- 
counts and financial matters. 
Look for more efficient 
methods. Supervise personal- 
ly all repair work on the 
home. 

SAGITTARIUS: (Nov. 22 to 
Dec. 21 — Also Sagittarius As- 
cendant) — Activity in the art 
and cultural world is em- 
phasized. Good time to learn 
an art form yourself — take 
classes. Changes in home — a 
new life style, or a residential 
move is a distinct possibility. 

CAPRICORN: (Dec. 22 to 
Jan. 19 — Also Capricorn As- 
cendant) — Problems with 
partner or mate may bring on 
depressive attitudes. Prob- 
lems have been a way of life 
for you for a while, but it is all 
about to lift. Good time to take 
a vacation or second honey- 
moon. 

AQUARRJS: (Jan. 20 to 
Feb. 18 — Also Aquarius As- 
cendant) — Honors and 
recognition could come now. 
Don't neglect the needs of 
another. Analyze for their 
loyalty new people you meet 
just now. Opposition from an 
associate is best ahndled by 
ignoring the situation. 

PISCES: (Feb. 19 to March 
20 — Also Pisces Ascendant) 

— Concentrate your actions 
on long-range goals. Career 
may get a boost now. Use your 
artistic abilities and follow 
yoiu" hunches. An offer relat- 
ing to your profession should 
be accepted. It appears lucky. 

Your emotional, mental and 
physical cycles can be pre- 
dicted so you know which are 
your opportunity days, and 
which are your critical days. 
Biorhythni cycles are figured 
on the basis of your birth date. 
For information, write: Your 
Horoscope Guide, Copley 
News Service, in care of this 
newspaper. 



CHECK TIRES 

Tests by a major tiie com- 
pany show that tires inflated 
below levels reconunended by 
the car manufacturer can cost 
motorists as much as one mile 
per gallon in gas mileage. — 



TWO CONVENIENT 
REASONS TO OPEN AN ACCOUNT 




BANK 



C . , , „ 



A N IT 



BANK 




HANCOCK 



GRANITE ST., DOWNTOWN 



Gianite_^ 
co-qper^ive^ 




Frank Sinatra 
is hot or cold 



...».»# 



By JOANNE B. ROMINE 
Copley News Service 

FRANK SINATRA ... the 
controversial man! 

People love him or they 
hate him, but seldom are they 
indifferent. There are those 
who say he is abusive, and yet 
you will also hear reports 
froni those who extol his kind- 
ness and generosity. 

What is he really like? 

Let's take a look at his writ- 
ing and and see what it re- 
veals about this superstar. 

He writes with heavy pres- 
sure and a rightward slant 
which reveals he is an in- 
tensely deep feeling man. He 
loves (or hates) with long- 
lasting emotion. He feels 
strongly about all things that 
touch his life or his areas of 
interest. 

He knows no middle road 
when it comes to his feelings. 
He is "hot" or "cold," but 
never lukewarm. 

Because of his mtense emo- 
tional nature he was forced to 
learn early in life that people 
in general did not understand 
him, and that he was most 
vulnerable. His feelings are 
easily hurt, and when he has 
been hurt, he wants to strike 
back. His weapon will be 
sharp, cutting, caustic words. 
Time and maturity have 
helped him to develop control 
of his quick temper. He con- 
sciously works at it. As a re- 
sult, he is learning to forgive 
those who have hurt or 
wronged him in the past, but 
he will never forget. 

This deeply emotional, 
highly responsive man has the 
capacity to experience life 
fully — the heights and the 
depths, the joys and the sor- 
rows, and with each experi- 



ence he becomes totally in- 
volved. 

He is loyal to friends and 
will fight for what he believes. 
He is sincerely interested in 
and concertied for others. 
However, he is also a very 
private person, one who wiU 
be very selective of those he 
allows to know him on a close 
intimate basis. This will, of 
course, narrow his area oi 
concern. His writing also re- 
veals courage and the ability 
to "hang in there" when the 
going gets rough. 

Mentally he is sharp and 
analytical. He has a keen, in- 
(|uiring mind and when some* 
thing has aroosed his interest 
it is difficult for him to set the 
matter aside. In his enthusi- 
astic pursuit of a subject or 
project, he can lose all sense 
of time. It is his enthusiasm 
and determination that drive 
him to the point of exhaustion. 

When his mood is light, he is 
a charming, diplomatic, in- 
teresting person to be with. 
Blessed with a quick, witty 
sense of humor, he can hold 
his own in most any conversa- 
tion. When his mood is low, 
the whole world looks black to 
him. He will become restless, 
irritable and depressed. 

In spite of his fame and pub- 
lic exposure, he is not a vain 
or pompous man. Rather, he 
tends to be a bit self-conscious 
and will experience mild feel- 
mgs of insecurity when meet- 
ing new people or when in un- 
familiar surroundings. He is 
warm, sincere, and impatient 
with delay. 

In looking at the total man, 
you will find much to admire 
and respect. In short, when he 
is good, he is very, very good, 
and when he is bad, he is 
fierce. 







Stay Alive! 



? ' ^?? ■ ^^^ ■ ^ ^^^ ^ ?^?^^ ^^ ? ^ ^^?' ^ 1 V^^?'^»Aatf^A???!WW? 



MOTORCYCLE SYNDROME 



During the past decade, 
motorcycle registration has 
zoomed from 500,000 to over 
two and a half million. Along 
with this increase has been a 
commensurate increase in 
highway fatalities involving 
motorcycles. 

The death rate in automobile 
accidents is 5.5 per 100 million 
miles, lor motorcycles it's a 
shocking 23 deaths per 100 
million miles - about 4 times 
higher. 

The major danger to cyclists 
lies in lack of protection. Fighty 
to 90 per cent of all motorcycle 
accidents result in death or injury 
for the cyclist. The most serious 
injury being that involving the 
head. 

Protective apparel, especially 
headgear should be worn for 



safety. Studies have shown 
beyond any doubt that crash 
helmets greatly reduce 
motorcycle injuries and fatahties. 
Cyclists should cooperate in 
accepting the responsibility for 
their own safety. 

* * « 

This infoimation has been 
brought to you as a public service 
by NABORHOOD PHARM.-VCY, 
406 Hancock St., No. Quincy. 

OUR SERVICES INCLUDE: 

24 hour emergency service. 
Charge accounts. 
Family prescription records. 
Year end ta.\ records. 
Delivery service, 
Insurance receipts. 
Hospital supplies for sale or rent, 
Open 7 days a week, 8-10. 
Phone: 7''3-6426 



Page 8 Quincy Sun Thursday, July 25, 1974 




Native Sweet Corn Season Arrives 



The native sweet corn season 
has arrived, reports the 
Massachusetts Department of 
Agriculture [MDA], and it is 
sweeter than ever before. 

On farm stands and produce- 
counters this week is the first of 
what is expected to be a heavy 
supply of a new bi-colored 
variety named "Sprite" that will 
delight corn-lovers as never 
before, says the MDA. The 
harvest will continue through 
September. 

The yellow-and-white-ker- 
neled corn replaces the older and 
highly popular variety known as 
"butter-and-sugar", which 
established an almost insatiable 
demand. 

The white kernels contain 
more sugar than the yellow, thus 
sweetening the entire corn. 
Although growers could produce 
an all-white corn, consumer 



preference is for yellow, but 
with the flavor of white. Under 
development for some time, the 
new hybrid has been adopted by 
growers almost to the exclusion 
of all other varieties. 

Prices, according to the MDA, 
are not expected to drop much 
over the season. Average retail 
for Florida corn throughout the 
winter - several days old by the 
time the shopper picks it up - 
has been about 12 cents - five 
for 59 cents, as a rule. Native 
prices are expected to be about 
the same, though some higher 
allowance should be made for 
the earliest pick. 

But it will still be a bargain 
and a joy to eat. 

Leftover sweet corn can be 
used in many ways. Let it cool, 
and store in the refrigerator. Cut 
the kernels from the cob to make 
any number of delicious recipes, 



such as 

CORN CREOLE 

2 Tbsp. butter or margarine; 1 
medium onion, chopped; 1 stalk 
celery or 1 pepper, chopped; VA 
cups canned tomatoes; % tsp. 
salt; dash pepper; 2 cups fresh 
corn kernels. Melt the butter, 
add onions & celery or pepper, 
saute about 5 minutes until 
tender; add tomatoes, salt, 
pepper and corn. Cook about 10 
minutes. Serves four. 

BEST BUYS FROM 

MASS FARMS 
In heavy supply this week, 
and reasonably priced, are native 
green beans, bunch beets, 
cabbage, chicory, escarole, 
Romaine and Boston lettuce, 
peas, yellow and zucchini 
squash. 



Pick Your Own Blueberries 



Do-it-yourself has come to the 
blueberry farms of the Bay 
State, reports the Massachusetts 
Department of Agriculture 
[MDA], as the plump blue fruit 
reaches harvest time, to continue 
into early September. 

Following the lead of the 



apple and strawberry growers, 
some of the blueberry farmers 
will sell you berries by the quart 
or pound, passing their labor 
savings on to you if you pick 
them yourself. 

A list of some 14 such farms 
is available from MDA. You can 



• • • 



NOW PICKING 



SWEET CORN 

FRESH FROM OUR FIELDS 
Complete Selection of Fresh Fruits & Vegetables 



PENNIMAN HILL FARM STAND 

ROUTE 53 749-2806 SO. HINGHAM 



SOUTH SHORE'S LARGEST MARKET GARDENERS 




nEMsEsW a,M,.,s TO 

QUINCY 

GINO'S 



ALL KINDS 
OF ITALIAN 
COLD CUTS 



NOW 

specializing! 

IN PARTY 
PLATTERS 



ITALIAN SPECIALTIES 
FORMERLY FABRIZIO'S 
29 INDEPENDENCE AVE. 
OPEN 9 TO 9 
SAT TILL 7 



'A«1 



"Cowplctc Si'lcctio)i of Italian Specialties" 



get the entire list with a 
stamped, self-addressed envelope 
to MDA Division of Markets, 
100 Cambridge St., Boston 
02202. If you want only a 
couple of nearby locations, you 
may call [617] 727-3018 for the 
information. 

The blueberry patch closest to 
Quincy is located on Green St. 
in Kingston and is operated by 
Angeio Ricci of Braintree. 

The berries are cultivated, 
"high bush" ones, growing 
waist-high for easy picking. The 
cultivated kind is not quite as 
sweet as the wild, but they are 
juicier and bigger than the wild 
ones, ranging in size up to the 
diameter of a half-dollar. 

Picking hours at the Kingston 
patch are flexible, but 7:30 
p.m., when the mosquitoes start 
biting, is the usual stopping 
time. 

The blueberries are sold by 
the quart and keep fresh for two 
or three days at room 
temperature, 10 to 12 days in 
the refrigerator and indefinitely 
in the freezer. 

One should always check with 
the. individual growers in 
advance for picking hours, crop 
availability, and possible 
restrictions. Some farms have a 
no-small-children policy. 



J For Home 
Delivery 

Call 



471-3100 

■^'^*** " *'^ " * * • ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ i. - i,i -^ iiii - iiii . i uu i . » i_ « - i 




BROAD MEADOWS Junior High School students receive Certificate 
of Honor for their entry to the American Lung Association's School 
Press Project. From left to right are: Miss Eileen Rugg, teacher of the 
Quincy girls, Joan Marie St. Angeio, Joyce MacLean, and presenting 
the award. Dr. Marjorie A. C. Young, President of the Norfolk 
County-Newton Lung Association. The girls entered radio spots on 
the hazards of cigarette smoking. 

HN Post, Auxiliary 
To Install Saturday 



The 1974-75 officers of 
Houghs Neck Legion Post and 
Auxiliary will be installed 
Saturday at 8 p.m. at the 
Houghs Neck Post Home, 1116 
Sea St. 

If weather permits, the public 
ceremony will take place 
out-of-doors. 

Norfolk County Commander 
James Flynn of Squantum will 



install new post officers, headed 
by Commander John 
Christensen. Auxiliary President 
Diane Clark and her officers will 
be installed by the Norfolk 
County director and her suite. 

Entertainment following will 
be by Sandy Wayne. There will 
be dancing and buffet 
refreshments. 



Old Fashioned Auction 
At Viking Club Saturday 



The Vikijig Club at 410 
Quincy Ave., Braintree is 
sponsoring an old fashioned 
country auction Saturday. 



Edward 


Myrbeck 


of 


15 


Primrose 


Ave., Braintree 


wUl 


open the 


bidding at 


il 


a.m. 



Items ranging from an aiitique 
melodian to a floor polisher to a 
water bubbler to radios and 
televisions will be for sale at the 
auction. 

Anyone wishing to donate 
items can call the Viking Club at 
843-9813. 



Film Festival, Costume Party 
To Aid Muscular Dystrophy 



A film festival and costume 
party will be hejd Wednesday, 
Aug. 21, from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. 
at the Torre Dei Passeri Social 
Club, 252 Washington St., 
Quincy. —-— 

All proceeds will "go toward 
the purchase o'f wtfcel chairs, 
braces, and patient care services 
for • childi-eh : stricken 
Muscular Dystrophy. 

: films will be shown w.itli 



by 



games and refreshments 
following. Children are 
encouraged to come in costume. 
There will be a prize awarded to 
the child wearing the best 
original costume. The party wijl 
be supervised for children of all 
ages. .... 

A donation of $1.50 plus 50 
cents for lunch is requested. For 
tickets and. more information 
contact Mrs. Leon Bclanger. 73 
Watenston Ave., Quincy. 



.. -i»\': 




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WHITE MOUNTAIN 

SPECIAL 

4 DAY TRIP 



To Mount Washington Hotel 

Aug. 29 -Sept. M974 

A// Departures from Randolph 
Reservations close Aug. 23 
FOR RATES AND INFORMATION CALL 

BRUSH HILL TRANSPORTATION CO. 

109 Norfolk Street 

Phone: 436-4)00 



L^jtf^^ Barrel 
OiwBb^s List 



Dorchester 



Lorraine B^riy of 89 Cilhek 
St., South Quincy is on the 
Dean's List at Northeastern 
University School of Nursing. 
She has straight A's. 




J 



Needs blood donations. 
Call for appointment 

773-6100 Ext. 438 

Mon. • Tues. ■ Wed. - Thurs. 
9 A.M.-3 P.M. &8-9 :30 P.M. 
Fri. 12 N.2 ?M. 
.Sat. .1.3:30 P.M. 



Thursday, July 25, 1974 Quincy Sun Page 9 



20 Named To Youth Commission Advisory Council 



A 20-member advisory 
council, including five high 
school students, has been 
appointed by Mayor Walter J. 
Hannon to advise the Quincy 
Youth Commission on matters 
concerning, the city's young 
people. 

The council was set up to 
include five members of high 
school age, five others under the 
age of 35 and 10 more to 
represent existing agencies and 
fields involved in the affairs of 
youth. 

The five high school members 



are Deborah Zimmerman, 
William Driscoll, Sissic Boyd and 
Marianne DelGreco, all of 
Quincy High; and Nancy Laing, 
of North Quincy High. 

The under-35 members are 
Jeff Isaacson, advisor to the 
South West Teen Council; Frank 
Brillo of ■ the Park and 
Recreation Department; Barbara 
DiNatale of the Police 
Department's Juvenile Division; 
John J. Kelly Jr. of the 
Neighborhood Youth Corps; and 
David Hamilton. 

Other members are Charlie 



59 From Quincy On 
B.C. High Honor Roll 



Fifty-nine Quincy residents 
are listed on the fourth-quarter 
"honor roll at Boston College 
High School. They are: 

First Honors; John P. Burke, 
Paul F. Cody, Robert . F. 
Fitzpatrick, William G. Flaherty, 
Raymond G. Gamache, Guy L. 
Genereux, Brian M. Gilfeather, 
Michael J. GilmorCj Gerard B. 
Hayes, Mark C. Jaehnig, James 
M. Lane, John R. Macheras, 
Kevin D. McElaney; Michael B. 
McHugh, John Nicastro, Joseph 
C. Peters, Thomas A. Pittman, 
Brian P. Reidy, Richard J. Riley, 
Bruce D. Smith, James S. 
Timmins. 

Second Honors: Paul J. 
Andrews, Steven D. Butts, 
Stephen G. Cattaneo, Thomas J. 
Cooney, Gerard F. Daley, 



Anthony S. Daniigella, Michael 
P. DiMino, James P. Donovan, 
Paul J. Genereux, John A. 
Guiney, Brian Hurley, Paul S. 
Kelly, William P. Kennedy, Mark 
B. Kerwin, George E. Kirvan Jr., 
Frederick F. Kussman, Michael 
P. McAuley, Thomas J. 
McGillvray, James P. O'Hare, 
Francis X. Robinson, William J. 
Schmitt, Thomas P. Sullivan, 
Joseph E. Zdankowski. 

Third Honors: Brian C. Dever, 
Therald C. Eastman, Patrick P. 
Glynn, Paul M. Higgins, John W. 
Hoffman, Stephen F. Jaehnig, 
Paul R. Howe, James P. Kenney, 
Joseph Lentini, Peter V. 
Moreschi, Edward T. O'Brien, 
Paul J. Principato, Garrett M. 
Quinn, Robert N. Rossi, John M. 
Sharry. 



Atty, Betsy Lebbos To Head 
United Way Community Drive 



Myron Cooper of Randolph, 
associate chairman of District 
Three in the south area division 
for the United Way of 
Massachusetts Bay campaign, 
announces Atty. Betsy Warren 
Lebbos has accepted 
chairmanship of the Quincy 
Community in the annual fall 
campaign. 

Atty. Lebbos, who practices 
law at 886 Washington St., 
Dedham, served as chairwoman 
in the professional division for 
the city last year. Under her 
direction the division brought in 
more money than had ever been 
raised in this division. 

Mrs. Lebbos is legal advisor 
for the city, is a member of the 
Rent Grievance Board, is 
co-chairman of the Quincy 
Coalition for Better Judges and 
the South Shore Women's 
Caucus. 

Mrs. Lebbos received her Juris 
doctor degree from Northeastern 
University Law School, a B.A. 
degree from Jackson College of 



Tufts University. She also 
attended the University of 
Madrid in Madrid, Spain. 

A member of the American 
Judicare Society, the 
Massachusetts Bar Association, 
Massachusetts Association of 
Women Lawyers, Norfolk 
County Bar Association, Quincy 
Bar Association, Massachusetts 
Trial Lawyers Association, The 
Federal Bar, American Bar 
Association, Public Contacts 
Division, Mrs. Lebbos and her 
7-year old daughter live at 1 1 
Grossman St., Quincy. 



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Diamond of Survival, Inc.; 
Raymond Cattaneo of the Park 
and Recreation Department; 
Edward Hannon, director of 
continuing adult education for 
the School Department; Dr. 
Luleen Anderson of the South 
Shore Mental Health 
Association. 

William Trifone, director of 
the Neighborhood Youth Corps; 



former Lt. Gov. Francis X. 
Bellotti; City Councillor Clifford 
H. Marshall; Sister Rita 
McCarthy, Robert Palmer and 
Donald Pound. 

The Advisory Council is 
required to meet at least six 
times a year and get together 
with the Youth Commission at 
least twice a year to present its 
recommendations. 




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Psge 10 Quincy Sun Thursday, July 25, 1974 



Sunbeams 



Will Mayor Hannon 
Seek A Third Term? 

By HENRY BOSWORTH 

It's generally assumed in political circles that Mayor Walter J. 
Hannon will automatically seek a third term next year. 

But, apparently it's not that certain. 

Insiders say that Hannan isn't deciding this far ahead and indicate 
he might possibly settle for two terms and return to his tire 
company. 

There is also speculation that Hannon will get a high appointment 
in private business or industry or perhaps a political post. 

City Hall sources say that the mayor's office gives the indication 
Hannon will go for No. 3, but that in reality they aren't that sure. 

And that Hannon isn't either. 

*** 

MEANWHILE, former Mayor James Mclntyre reportedly is still 
considering a return to the political arena as a candidate. He is still a 
behind-the-scene power in the city but friends think he really misses 
being "out front" as an active elective office holder. 

It's doubtful he would run for mayor again but city council 
at-large or school committee may yet lure him back. 

Anyway, he's been asking friends "What do you think?" about 
him returning to the wars. The reaction has been quite tremendous 
in favor. 

They say he got quite a lot of encouragement and offers to work 
for his election following an item here some weeks ago that he might 
stage a "comeback". 

*♦♦ 

AND, SPEAKING OF next year's city election. Sabina Stenberg, 
the Wollaston beauty salon owner, is telling everyone slie's tossing 
her bonnet into the ring: for city council-at-large. 

She's quite an active gal and if slie puts as much work into 
campaigning as she does in the many civic-charitable projects she is 
involved in, she'd be a formidable candidate. 

No woman has come close to being elected to the City Council 
since Edna Austin, the only female ever to serve there, voluntarily 
retired in 1959. 

MORE TRIBUTE FOR former City Council President Laurence 
Curtin, who was recently honored by the Quincy Citizens 
Association who presented him with its first "Citizen of The Year 
Award." 

A feature story on him by Paul Harold which appeared in the 
June 20 issue of The Quincy Sun has been placed in the 
Congressional Record by Congressman James A. Burke [D-Milton] . 

Curtin, who has served Quincy as a public-spirited citizen for 
more than 50 years also got this personal tribute from Burke: 

"I would like to congratulate Mr. Curtin in being the first 
recipient of this award and for setting such a high example for 
citizen participation in public affairs." 

*** 

TO WHOM IT may concern: To the anonymous person who sent 
us the character assassinating poem about a city councillor and the 
cemetery probe and the note: "Would you dare to print this in your 
paper next week?" we'd like to say: Would you dare to print your 
name and address with it? 

♦ * ¥ 

WELL, Rep. Joseph Bretf will run another no-signs campaign for 
re-election. Says he will "again refrain this year from posting 
political signs on poles, lawns, fences, buildings and other locations 
where they would tend to detract from the appearance of the 
community." 

And, like in other years, he says he hopes other candidates "will 
likewise refrain from littering the city with political posters in a joint 
effort to keep Quincy as an attractive and desirable city in which to 
live." 

Of course a relatively unknown challenger might debate that. 

A LONG-TIME City Hall favorite, Vi Pace, was honored by 
colleagues and friends Tuesday night at the Quincy Neighborhood 
Club. She recently retired after serving the city for 43 years. 

During that time, she was Gal Friday to City Manager William 
Deegan, Mayor Thomas Burgin, Mayor David Mcintosh and Mayor 
Amelio Delia Chiesa. From 1961 to her retirement last month, she 
was secretary in the City Solicitor's office. 

SAY, isn't that City Planning Director Geoffrey Davidson 
planning-a beard? 

*** 

OBSERVATION via the Quincy Kiwanis Club newsletter: "A 
good supervisor, someone once said, is a guy who can step on your 
toes without messing up your shine." 

SMILE DEPT: Jack Silverstein, the North Quincy druggist, jogger, 
author, etc., recalls when he was a kid, no one had to move to a 
better neighborhood. The landlord just raised the rent. 

"1 — r-r 




Summer Scene 

Open House 

July 30 

the staff and children of 
Summer Scene '74 at Broad 
Meadows Junior High School are 
planning an open house from 9 
a.m. to noon Tuesday, July 30. 

The program will begin at 9 
with the presentation of the 
musical "My Fair Lady". This 
will be followed by a gymnastics 
demonstration put on by the 
boys and girls of Summer Scene. 

After the gymnastics 
demonstration, coffee and 
refreshments prepared by the 
children will be served. 

Following the refreshments, 
the parents will have the 
opportunity to ooserve their 
children in the various areas and 
on-going activities they 
participate in during the week. 
For further information, call 
47M610. 

$363,135 In 

New Plumbing 

During June 

Inspector of Plumbing and 
Gas Fitting James A. Erwin Jr., 
reports 7 1 plumbing applications 
for an estimated $363,135 in 
plumbing were filed during the 
month of June. 

A total of $1,312 was 
received for permits. Ninety-nine 
plumbing inspections were 
made. 

Major projects for the month 
were apartment complexes at 77 
Adams St., Quincy - costing 
$300,000 - and at 80 Newbury 
Ave., Atlantic - costing $20,000. 

Erwin also reported the filing 
of 45 gas applications, costing an 
estimated $14,055. 

Sixty-one inspections were 
made and $89 was received for 
permits. 



Living, Today 

By Dr. WHIiam F. Kmx 
Ptrsonal Counselor 



^Please Love Me* 



There is an old saying that 
women give sex for love ... that 
men give love for sex. 1 find less 
and less differences between the 
motivations of men and women 
... more and more dangers in 
generalilizations. Everybody 
wants to be loved ... and we 
resort to different tricks to get 

it. 

For both men and women 
wanting to be loved is a normal 
need and millions of people are 
searching for ways to get 
themselves loved. Many people 
just don't know how. Many try 
to get themselves loved by 
GIVING THINGS that money 
will buy. Many try to get 
themselves loved by DOING 
NICE THINGS for someone. 
These methods are short lived. A 
man can never do enough nice 
things. 

How then do I get myself 
loved? The first and most 
important step toward being 
loved is to LOVE ONESELF. If 
a person does not love 
himself/herself ... puts oneself 
down ... looks upon oneself as 
unworthy of any good thing ... 
or any compliment ... this 
person is more an object of pity 
than an object of love. 

The person who loves 
himself/herself takes care of 
himself/herself ... provides for 
ones physical ... emotional ... 
intellectual needs ... keeps 
improving oneself and one's self 
image. Happiness shows through 
the person who loves 
himself/herself. 

The person who loves 
himself/herself is not filled with 
anger ... bitterness ... 
resentment. It's difficult to love 
an angry person. Jackson was 
this kind of man. His older 
brother was favored by his 
mother and father. All tlu-ough 
his childhood he felt rejected by 



the people he most wanted to 
love him. Then he started getting 
into trouble ... little thefts at 
home and in stores. He got 
attention (a poor substitute for 
love) by each of this 
misdemeanors. The more of 
them he did, the less he was 
loved. Now a grown man the 
resentment has turned against 
himself. His morose ... sour 
attitude toward hfe makes him 
most unlovable. Yet ... he still 
wants to be loved ... and blames 
others for not loving him. 

Laura still blames her ■ parents 
for a job move from one 
communityi where she had 
friends when she was 10. She 
refused to make new friends in 
the new community ... acted 
hateful and melancholy. She 
wondered why ?he was not 
loved. She hated herself and her 
self hate made her unlovable. All 
her efforts to get others to love 
her were doomed from the start 
... they came through phony 
because she was not a friend to 
herself. Now she's learning that 
if one wants to be loved (and 
who doesn't) one must first love 
oneself. Giving things won't 
get you loved ... neither will 
doing things ... these are just 
techniques for manipulating 
another person ... making 
someone beholden to you. If 
you want to be loved by others, 
love yourself first. Then your 
self Iove>will overflow to others 
... and they can join YOU in 

loving YOU. 

• • • • 

FOR YOUR COMMENTS: 
For private counseling, 
telephone counseling, group 
counseling, contact Dr. Knox at 
659-7595 or 326-5990. For his 
book "People Are For Loving" 
send $3.00 to Dr. Knox at 320 
Washington St., Norwell, Mass. 
02061. 



Rosemary Wahlberg Appointed 

First Woman QHA Member Would 
Like Low Cost Housing For Young 



Mrs. Rosemary Wahlberg of 
264 Southern Artery, Quincy, is 
the first woman to be appointed 
to serve on the Quincy Housing 
Authority. 

She described herself as "very 
excited and honored" to be 
named to the five-member board 
by Gov. Francis Sargent. 

She succeeds Francis X. 
McCauley who had served five 
years. 

McCauley was a candidate for 
re-appointment to the Housing 
Authority board and said he was 
"disappointed" that he did not 
receive the nomination. But he 
continued: 

"I have enjoyed serving on the 
board for five years, one year as 
chairman. We made substantial 
increases in housing for the 
elderiy and I enjoyed being part 
of it. I wish Mrs. Wahlberg every 
success during her term on the 
board." 



A native of Boston, Mrs. 
Wahlberg moved to Quincy 16 
years ago, becoming a tenant at 
Snug Harbor. There she raised 
her eight children. She moved to 
her present home last year. 

A graduate of Dorchester 
School for Girls and a two-year 
student at Boston State College, 
Mrs. Wahlberg holds two jobs. 
She is the director of 
Germantown Multi Service 
Center and is a part-time 
nutrition assistant for Norfolk 
County, working on nutrition 
education programs in 
Southwest Quincy and in 
Germantown. 

Although the 43-year-old 
Democrat said that she had "no 
miracle cures" for Quincy's 
housing problems, she did point 
to "an unmet need" to provide 
young families with low-cost 
housing. She said: 

"The Quincy Housing 



Authority has done a fantastic 
job in the area of housing for the 
elderly. Now there must be a 
concern for young families who 
need low-cost housing." 

Mrs. Wahlberg explained that 
she is the first nominee to be 
selected to the board through a 
process involving tenant 
participation. She said that all 
candidates for the board 
position spoke before the 
tenants who in turn submitted 
their nominee preferences to 
Louis Crampton, commissioner 
of the Community Department 
of Affairs. 

She also praised Quincy 
tenants as sophisticated in their 
knowledge about public housing. 

"Quincy should be proud of 
their tenants," she said. "Board 
meetings are well-attended and 
the tenants are interested in 
having an input into the 
decisions affecting their hves." 



Sheets Asks Unauthorized Trucks Kept Off Parkway 



In Japan, next to the emperor, rice is the mo.st scared of all 
things on earth. 



MDC poUce have indicated 
they will increase surveillance to 
keep unauthorized trucks off 
Furnace Brook Parkway. 

Ward 4 Councillor James A. 
Sheets said he received that 
indication after informing the 
MDC Blue Hills Division that 
there has been "a substantial 
increase" in the number of 
commercial vehicles using the 
parkway. 

Sheets noted that the MDC 
had waived the commercial 
restriction on trucks carrying 
dredged materials from Black's 
Creek. 



But, he said, drivers of other 
trucks have assumed the right to 
also use the parkway. 

"It is one thing for the people 
of Furnace Brook Parkway to 



have the large, trucks from 
Black's Creek travelling by their 
houses; it is another thing to 
watch a daily increase in other 
commercial truck traffic," 
Sheets said. 



Danny, The Sundae Kid 



Four-year-old Danny Santry 
of 30 Eudid Ave., Quincy, has a 
heap of ice cream eating to do. ' 

Danny won the "Month of 
Sundaes" drawing at 
Baskm-Robbins during the 
Sidewalk Bazaar promotion 



His prize: 31 8 5-cent sundaes. 



NEWSBOYS WAN 
Here's a chance to earn extra 

money by building a Quincy 

Sun home delivery route. 

Telephone: 471-3100 



•'-l--('*«**'V.V. • 



Sun Survey Shows 



'■^?V^ 






■■; iil<*? V 



f'^ 



Thursday, July 25, 1974 Quinc> Sun Page 1 1 



A 



? •>■'» 



i^. 






Shoppers Would Like Hancock St. A Permanent Mall 



By MARY ANN DUGGAN 

It's a shopper's dream - 
Hancock St. as a beautified, 
trafficless Mall. 

The vote was unanimous in a 
random survey conducted by 
The Quincy Sun Friday 
afternoon during Quincy's 
Sidewalk Bazaar, when Hancock 
St. was blocked off from traffic. 
Twenty-one persons were 
asked: 

"What do you think of 
turning Hancock 3t. into a 
permanent mall?" 

Most people responded 
immediately, calling the idea 
"great", "good", and "terrific". 
Others hesitated pensively 
before replying, yet still gave 
their approval to the idea. 

Ten out of 21 mentioned the 
longed-for, *dream-like 
disappearance of traffic which 
would result from the 
construction of the fantasized 
mall. 

The reactions: 

Anne Clark of 202 Weir St. 
Extension, Hingham, who works 
at Bottoms Up on Hancock St.: 
"It would be a good idea. The 
traffic is awful here during the 
day. You can't get across the 
street. The street would be 
better blocked off. People could 
walk back and forth easily." 

Mrs. Adele Olsson of 30 
Hunter Terrace, ■ South 
Weymouth and a former 12-year 
resident of Quincy agreed: 

"It's a great ide^," she said, 
"there'd be a more 
shopping-center atmospher?. 
And there'd be no worry about 
the traffic." 

Six people cited the 
aggravation of parking meters as 
happily vanishing with the 
building of a mall. 

Mrs. Lewis Rossignol of 22 
Audrey St., South Quincy, 
commented: 

"I think it would stimulate 
people to shop. There'd be no 
parking problems. And it would 
be better if there were free 
parking, especially for mothers 
with small children. Now 
mothers have to keep running 
back and forth to feed the 
meters." 

Mrs. Doris O'Brien of 15 
Debra Lane also expressed 
aggravation over the parking 
situation on Hancock St. 

"I'm not apt to shop here," 
she said, "because of the parking 
situation. And it's unfair to 
charge a parking fee. Our taxes 
pay for that. A person could be 
downtown for five minutes or 
five hours. If he's over, he's 
fined. But if he's under, there's 
no refund. It irritates me." 



Many people agree. One 
young woman, Mary Anne 
Chambers of 45 Adams St., 
Holbrook described parking 
conditions as "brutal" in 
downtown Quincy. She said that 
she would come to the area 
more often if there were more 
convenient parking facilities. 

One woman, Mrs. Wayne 
Clark of 80 Sea Ave., Houghs 
Neck, expressed a unique 
opinion. She said: 

"You know, a few years ago, 
when all the malls started to pop 
up, people said Quincy would 
fold. But it's not so. Quincy has 
thrived beautifully. 

"It's my feeling," she 
continued, "to give our city our 
business and it will stay alive. 
That's why I don't go into 
Boston." 

Mrs. Joseph Dooner of 42 
Lintric Drive, South Weymouth, 
and a 30-year resident of 
Quincy, said: 

"A mall with free parking 
would be a boon to Quincy's 
business. 

Ruth Brown of Chard St., 
East Weymouth agreed. 
"Something has to be done," she 
said. "We don't come in that 
often". 

"It would be great for 
business," said Robert Babalos 
of 21 Botolph St., North 
Quincy. "Quincy is a Uttle 
barren of trees. A mall would 
add to the pleasure of the whole 
community." 

Mrs. Dorothy Guarniere of 
119'Darrow St., Houghs Neck, 
also said that Quincy would be 
prettier, more attractive, with 
the addition of a mall. She said, 
too, that the free parking at 
shopping plazas .has "hurt 
business" in Quincy. 

Mrs. Walter Adams of 
Hawthorne Ave., Braintree 
remarked, "It's a good idea. It 
would get shoppers back 
downtown... People really don't 
like to travel to shop." 

Five of the 21 mentioned 
convenience as a plus of a mall. 
"It would be more enjoyable to 
shop," said Wayne Harrington of 
Weymouth, a sales clerk in 
Milton's. "And you wouldn't get 
wet in the rain." 

And if Steven Sacchetti of 19 
Carruth St., WoUaston is 
representative of the 
10-year-olds in Quincy, they, 
too, would favor the building of 
a mall. Steven said: 

"It would be pretty nice. It's 
fun to watch the people and to 
buy things. You can walk in the 
street and not worry about the 
cars. Atr'tf ^ could bring my little 
brothers with me. We could look 
at the toys." 








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SHOPPERS jam Hancock St. for bargain buys during fifth annual Sidewalk Bazaar sponsored by Quincy 
Center Business and Professional Association. Thousands turned out for the three days and nights of 
activities. 



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343 NEWPORT AVENUE - WOLLASTON Member South Shore 
47 9 ■ 1 1 4 Oiamber of Commerce 



Page 12 Quincy Sun Thundiy, July 25, 1974 



John Calarese Wins 
Navy Superior Civilian Award 



John B. Calarese of 1 15 Mollis 
Ave., North Quincy was recently 
presented the Navy Superior 
Civilian Award for outstanding 
contributions and service to the 
Navy Department as Director of 
Management Engineering at 
Boston Naval Shipyard, during 
the period of its closure from 
April 17, 1973 to July 1, 1974. 

Rear Admiral R. G. Gooding, 
Commander, Naval Ship 
Systems, in presenting the award 
noted Calarese's exceptional 
dedication and professional 
expertise which reflected in his 
performance during the period 



of the Shipyard's 
dis-estabhshment. 

"He directed the closure plan 
in a smooth, orderly and 
economical way. His devotion to 
his task were far above the level 
normally expected and were of 
great value to the Navy," said 
Admiral Gooding. 

Captain R. L. Arthur, the 
Shipyard Commander, also 
presented him a Quality Step 
Increase in recognition for 
sustained high quality job 
performance which benefited 
the Shipyard and the Navy. 



Ena Fredette Retiring 
From Snue Harbor School 



Miss M. Ena Fredette of 20 
Windsor Rd, North Quincy is 
retiring from Snug Harbor 
School after a 37-year career in 
teaching and guidance. 

Miss Fredette has been a 
full-time guidance counsellor at 
Snug Harbor for the past eight 
. years. In 1950 she was named 
head counsellor at Central 
Junior High. Two years later she 
became a member of the 
Adjustment Service, the initial 
guidance program covering all 
elementary schools in the city. 
A product of Quincy Public 
Schools, Miss Fredette graduated 
from Bridgewater State College 
in 1932. For two years she 
taught at Walter Fernald School 
for the mentally retarded. 

In 1934, Miss Fredette joined 
John Hancock School as a 
fourth and fifth grade teacher 
where she taught for nine years. 
Then, in 1943, she entered 
Midshipman School at Smith 
College, earning her comrnission 
as ensign. Miss Fredette next 
traveled to Hollywood Beach, 
Calif., where she received her 
navigation wings. Then she 
worked for two years as a naval 
instructor at the ground school 



at C'abaniss Field, Corpus 
Christi. Texas, where she earned 
the rank of lieutenant. During 
the last six months of 1945, she 
served as station navigator at 
Squantum Naval Air Station. 

Miss Fredette resumed her 
teaching career in 1948 at 
Central Junior High School. 
There, she not only taught 
classes in seventh grade English 
and History but also acted as a 
guidance counsellor. 

At the same time. Miss 
Fredette resumed her formal 
education. In 1948 she received 
an A.B. in Geography from 
Boston University Graduate 
School of Liberal Arts. Four 
years later she earned her 
master's degree from the same 
university. 

Miss Fredette was a member 
of Quincy Education 
Association, Massachu.setts 
Teachers Association, 
Massachusetts School 
Counsellors Association and 
Quincy American Field Service 
Committee. She serves on the 
Finance Committee of Atlantic 
Memorial Church and is a 
member of Delta Cappa Gamma, 
NU. 



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"The Best In New England" 

FISHER'S , 

HOBBY STORE I 

Complete Selection Of Models 

For All Ages 
389B HANCOCK ST., NORTH QUINCY 



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* Walsh's Famous Clam Chowder 

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Featuring Sherried Seafood 

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WALSH'S 
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NORTH QUINCY 




CANCER FIGHT - Charles Doherty [second right], bingo chairman of the North Quincy Knights of 
Columbus, presents a check for $500 to Dan Barry, general chairman of the Cancer Crusade. Looking on 
are John Farmer [second left] , president of the South Shore unit of the American Cancer Society, and 
Grand Knight Maurice Dunn. 

Nearly 500 Take Part In Project LINC 



Neariy 500 students from the 
junior and senior high schools of 
Quincy took part in the 
activities of Quincy's Title 111 
project LINC, Learning in 
Community, this past school 
year. 

After special study, and under 
the direction of 23 teachers 
trained by the project, small 
groups of from 5 to 10 students 
visited such community sites as 
the Quincy and Dorchester 
District Courts. Pneumatic Scale, 
and the Consumer Safety 




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423 HANCOCK ST. 
NO, QUINCY 




9 BILLINGS RD. NORTH QUINCY 773.5508 



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SPECIALS 

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RESTAURANT 



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NORTH OUINCY 

FREE PARKING 
IN REAR 




Division of the Attorney 
Generals Office. A total of 21 
community sites were visited 
several times during the year, 
with individual visits lasting 
from one day to three weeks, 
depending on what could be 
learned on the site. 

Longest of the trips. North 
Quincy High seniors to Ft. 
Independence on Castle Island, 
in conjunction with the MDC's 
effort to restore the Fort for the 
Bicentennial. Students under the 
supervision of Bernard LaCoture 



niisterSUB 

64 Billings Rd 
North Quincy 479-9685 

OpposiU" I .ishioiiyiialiiy CkMiKTs 

Joseph Buccini 
WHY BOTHER 

COOKING TODAY 
ENJOY A DELICIOUS 
HOT OR COLD 

SUBMARINE SANDWICH 
TRY OUR 

EGGPLANT 
PARMIGIANA 



of North, unearthed the remains 
of several buildings and artifacts 
within the walls of the Fort. 

Next year the program will 
continue with nearly double the 
number of students and trained 
teachers. The project will 
include a pilot program with 
sixth graders. New sites 
developed for next year will 
include several of Quincy's 
historical places, these visits 
being made in preparation for 
the cities 350th anniversary. 




I WE CAN HELP | 

YOU MAKE THE I 

RIGHT DECISION | 

WHEN BUYING OR S 

SELLING A HOME • 



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OPEN MON. TO SAT. 

10 A.M. TO 11 P.M. 

SUNDAY2P.M,T0 9I>.M. 



PRESIDENT 
Real Estate 



f*4 UIHnflt RMd, N«rMt Quincy^ 

[H 773-1237 



An Old Fashioned Hardware Store Est 1898 

TURNER HARDWARE 

471 HANCOCK STREET 
^^ NORTH QUINCY, MASS. 02171 

Sacret:Pro,uas '''■'''' PluJZTsupplies 

Benjamin Moore Paints Hand & Power Tooh 

General Hardware Supplies A,rico Lawn ^ GarIe7products 

100% Pure Hardwood 
Lump Charcoal £^\qq 
20 LB. Bag "^J 

3/8" Black & Decker Drill 

Variable speed, complete with carrying case ^ 
ibuffmg pads, sanding discs, grinding wheel^' 
drills. Reg. $36.95. 

Windows and Screens Repaired Aluminum and'wood 

OPEN Weekdays 7:30 -5:30 Saturd.y 7:30-5:00 
Come in and visit with us Paul & Don Nogueira A Little I>»re 



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Thursday, July 25, 1974 Quincy Sun Page 13 



YOtr^AY BE A WINNER 
2 EXCITING WEEKENDS 



FOR TWO COUPLES TO 




Complets Arrangements Made By QuinWell Travtl Service Inc. 1424 Hancock St.. Quincy And 565 Washington St.. Wellesley 
SPONSORED BY THE NORTH QUINCY BUSINESS AND PROFESSIONAL ASSOCIATION 



SVENSKA 
CHURCH WHITE 

OIL BASED HOUSE PAINTS 



^:^^n 



WITH 

THIS 

AD 



$7 



95 




Walsh's 
Restaurant 

Every Friday 12 to 4 

Seafood Luncheon 
in the Quincy Room 



PER 
GAL. 



9 BILLINGS ROAD 
NORTH QUINCY 



773-5508 



Let US mind your business . 

DORAN & HORRIGAN 

Elnsuranc? - R^al Estate 
19 Billings Road, N. Quincy 



»t*l'0« 



4797697 



6 GaL LIMIT 



Reg. price $9.98 



ATLAS PAINT and 
ELECTRIC SUPPLY 

401 Hancock St. NORTH QUINCY 
^^J7?J622,471^S272_ 

Register At Our 

North Quincy Branch 

South Shore National Bank 



FRANCETTP 

World of Nature 

• IHl COMflfTE rti SHOr • 

Tropical A Morin* Fith ■ Eielic Animalt 
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Open Weekdays 417 HANCOCK ST., OUINCY 

10 A.M. -8 P. M - — . ._.».^ 

Sun. 12 6 P.M. 47l-7570 

SAT lO-j ' fr V 

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We Accept Moster Charge & BonkAmcncord 



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Insurance Service At Its Best 




Other Offices Serving Quincy /M^ 

Adams Shore • Quincy Center 

Quincy Point • Wollaston 



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15 Billings Road 
Open Til 9 North Quincy 479-4044 



t 



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THORNTON 



REAL ESTATE 
AND 
INSURANCE AGENCY 

419 HANCOCK ST. 
479 1107 



"One Stop Automotive Store" 

COMPLETE STOCK OF 
AUTO PARTS ON HAND 



BOB'S SPEED 
& AUTO PARTS 



496 Hancock St. 
No. Quincy 
471-7470 



Open weekdays till 9 P.M., Saturday till 5 P.M. 



Register Here /^^ 

HANCOGK 
BANK 



North Oi'irK-y 



REGISTER AT - - - - 

^^^^ ,, -- 48BILLINGS 

^B V^ QUINCY 

^y- ^^^^^^^DCM 7 PAYS 

(7 TO 11 P.M. 



CURTIS 



COMPACT 

FOOD 

STORES 



NABORHOOD 

PHARMACY 

"When in Tfce Ne#boifcood Ute The Ntborhood" 

HOSPITAL & SURGICAL 

SUPPLIES FOR SALE OR RENT 

PRESCRIPTIONS 

406 HANCOCK ST. QUINCY 773-64M 
OPEN 8 A.M. - 10 P.M. EVERYDAY 



"SWEEP-LESS'' DAYS ? 

BRING YOUR SICK 
TIRED VACUUM TO.... 

Hussey 
Vacuum Repairs 

23 Billings Rd, North Quincy 479-7760 




CAMMY'S 

DELICATESSEN 

• PARTY PLATTERS 
•SPECIAL 994 LUNCHEONS 
•HOME STYLE SALADS •LIGHT LUNCHES 
•ASSORTED COLD MEATS 
•PACKAGED BEER AND WINE 

S3 BilliNis Road Ntrtk Qiiney 

Charlie and Fran Tirone 472-S71Z 




Gianlte_> 

co-g)er^ive^ 



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Nonh Quincv 



HOT AND 
COLD SUBS 



LARGE 
SELECTION OF. . 

Featuring Our Popular 

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njisterSUB 

EAT IN OR TAKE OUT 

OPEN MON. THRU SAT. 10 TO 1 1 P.M. SUN. 2 P.M. TO 9 P.M. 

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OppOMiC I JlhlOnQlMliU (ICJIKTs 



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QuiiKy 



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• Commertial 
• Residential 
• Industrial 




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MASS. AUTO IEASIN6 INC,. 



CAR STOLEN — 
WRECKED ? ? 

Your Insurance Corrtpani) 
may cover oil coilf. 



Two convenient locations: 



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MILEAGE 
CHARGE 
We rent or 
lease 



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(opposite No. Quincy MBTA Station) „, 

Tel: 328-5720 Low Rates" 






Energy Savini 

Heat Savini 

Prict Savini 

100% Salirf State 
Color Portables & 
Color Consoles 

NESCO 423 Hancock St., Quincy 



Women's Summer 

Shoes and Sandals 
Now $5. 

$7. $9. 

Some Styles Slightly Higher 

OPEN THURS. 
AND FRI.TIL9 

40 BILLINGS ROAD NORTH QUINCY 




Ipefilla 



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o 

PC 
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8 



i^yV^;^WVVVi/vvvvv.->;-^ <^^-^>^>^ '- *• *■ *• - * 




Page 14 Quincy Sun Thursday, July 25, 1974 



Young Ideas 

Unedited selections from the writings 
of Quincy's elementary school children. 



KITS 

Arts and crafts 
Beautiful bright crafts 
Keeps you very busy 
Art 

Susan Maginis 

Furnace Brook School 

Grade 6 

Puppies 

Warm and furry 
I'm happy I have one 
They run around and jump 
and play 
Young dogs 

Jean Sweeney 

Furnace Brook School 

Grade 6 

SHEA RINK 

On Feb. 15, 1974 Room 8 
Miss Hunters class went to Shea 
rink. We skated from 9:00 to 
11:00. Miss Hunter fell down 
once. I fell down three times! 

Eileen Mayer 

WoUaston School 

Grade 2-3 

KITTEN 

Kitten 

Furry, fluffy 
How I love to pet them 
My two are pigs they love to 
eat 

Fur ball 

Karen Buhler 

Furnace Brook School 

Grade 6 

RECORDS 

Records 

Rock hits, top ten 

Pretty, earshattering 

Dancing in time to the music 

Loud fun 

Kristen Williams 

Furnace Brook School 

Grade 6 

MUSIC 

Music 

It's relaxing 

It has a lot of melody 

It is very nice 

Liane Swan 

Furnace Brook School 

Grade 5 

NATURE 

Nature 

Freeness wonder 
Wet leaves dew on the ground 
Clean, fresh air, hmm, breath 
it in. Now! 
WUd life. 

Lizzy Skoler 

Furnace Brook School 

_^^ Grade 6 

MUSIC LESSONS 

Professional Instruction 
DRLM PIANO GUITAR 
BRASS REEDS 

WOLLASTON MUSIC CENTER^ 

27 Beale St.^ Wollaston 
Call 773-5325 



WOLLASTON 

Beale St. off Hancock St. 

QUINCY PR 3-1600 



WED. 7/24 THRU TUES. 7/30 

SERPIGO 

with Al Pacino 

9:15 P.M. [R] 

FRIENDS OF 
EDDIE COYLE 

with 

Robert Mitchum 
7:30 P.M. [Rl 



ADMISSION $1.00 



FINAST STORE 

We went to Finast Store. And 
they showed us how to cut the 
meat and how the dates on the 
items. And then we had some 
choclate milk and donuts. 

Nora Furey 

Wollaston School 

Grade 2-3 

MONTILLIO'S 

We went to Montillio's in 
Quincy. They showed us how to 
make a Swiss pie and how to 
make roses on a cake. After they 
showed us everything, the ladie 
gave us a butter soctch cookie 
each, then we got to get 
someting out at the counter. It 
was intresting. We saw a cake 
with Raggedy Ann and Winnie 
the pooh and a cake with a 
Bikini on. 

Melissa Allen 

Wollaston School 

Grade 2-3 

SEASONS 

Seasons 

Summer, Winter 
Spring. Fall I love them all 
Changing when the time 
comes to change 
Changing. 

Kristen Williams 

Furnace Brook School 

Grade 6 

COLORS 

Colors 

Some colors are sad 
Colors show what you're 
feeling 

Colors are pretty 

Lois Leonhardi 

Furnace Brook School 

Grade 5 

SUN 

Sun 

The Sun gives us light 
The sun goes down at night 
time 

It comes up at dawn. 

Lois Leonhardi 

Furnace Brook School 

Grade 5 

FINAST STORE 

We went to Finast and it is a 
big store. We saw a chunck of 
meat. We went to see the 
Refridgerator room. It was cold. 
It had lots of meat in it. We 
liked it. 

John Ramsden 

Wollaston School 

Grade 2-3 

MONTILLIO'S BAKERY 

1 went to Montillio's and saw 
cookies, Big lollipops and butter 
crunch cookies. We saw how 
they made Easter cookies and 
decorated cakes. 

Tommy McEachern 

Wollaston School 

Grade 2-3 





Radar^ Too 



MDC Beefs Up Police Beach Patrol 



MDC Police Supt. Edward F. 
Fahey has announced a step-up 
in patrol along the area of 
Quincy Shore Drive and 
Wollaston Beach. 

The announcement came in 
response to a request by Rep. 
Joseph E. Brett, asking for 
increased surveillance in that 



area, especially during the 
summer months. 

Fahey reported that as of July 
1, the entire Detective Bureau 
and five recruits from the 
Academy were assigned to Old 
Colony Station to patrol the 
Wollaston Beach ares. 

"We are aware of the large 



crowds that populate this 
excellent beach during the 
bathing season and have 'beefed 
up' our patrols accordingly," he 
said. 

Fahey also noted that radar 
equipment is being used on 
Quincy Shore Drive. 



Savits Receives National Engineers Merit Award 



Ja-cob (Jack) Savits, 
engineering consultant for the 
Quincy Public Schools and the 
City of Quincy, has received a 
National Award of Merit from 
the Society of Manufacturing 
Engineers. 

Presentation of a placque was 
made at the Hillcrest Function 
Room in Waltham by the 
Society's Boston Chapter, of 
which Savits is co-founder. 

A worldwide organization 
with 39,000 members in 40 
countries and headquarters in 
Dearborn. Mich., the SME is 
devoted to the advancement and 
publication of scientific 
knowledge in the field of 
manufacturing engineering. 
Every year the Society confers 
awards in recognition of 
outstanding contributions to the 
organization's professional 
activities and to its prestige in 
the world of industry. This year 
citations went to 13 SME 




JACK SAVITZ 

members from localities as 
far-flung as Japan and New 
Jersey, Canada and Arizona. 

Savits has won international 
acknowledgement for his 
pioneer work in metalurgy: 
nitriding 4140 steels, the 
development of ductile irons. 



the passivation of stainless 
steels~as well as for work with 
neoprenes and plastics. The 

American Society for Metals 
granted him a Gold Medal in 
association with Nuclear Metals 
for processes in the development 
of double-inserted stainless steel 
tubing. Much of this recognition 
came while Mr. Savits was 
employed at the Pneumatic 
Scale Corporation of North 
Quincy, where he served in 
various capacities for nearly fifty 
years and for which company he 
now functions on a consultative 
basis. 

Currently Savits is an 
engineering trouble-shooter for 
the Superintendent and Mayor. 
Routinely checking construction 
costs, material quality, and 
building specifications, he is 
responsible for saving the School 
and City many thousands of 
dollars each year. 



Ellis Swartz Retires After 28 Years School Service 



Ellis J. Swartz, coordinator of 
Foreign Languages in the Quincy 
Public Schools, retired last week 
after 28 years service to the 
school system. 

Swartz, since September 
1946, has served as a German 
and Social Studies teacher, 
chairman of the Foreign 
Language Department at Quincy 
High School and for the past 
four years as coordinator of 
Foreign Languages for the entire 
school system. He has also 
served as director of English As 
A Second Language program in 
Grades K through 1 2. 

In April 1963 Swartz 
organized a special course in the 
study of World Leaders for 20 
Advanced Problems of 
Democracy students at Quincy 
High and culminated the course 
with a special trip for the 



students to Italy, Jugoslavia, 
England, Germany and France 
where the students conferred 
with the educational, political, 
economic leaders of these 
countries. The trip was aided by 
President Kennedy and Senator 
Edward Kennedy. 

Swartz introduced the Amity 
Aide program to Quincy and has 
directed the program for the 
past four years with young 
university graduates from 
Europe and Latin America 
helping Quincy's students learn 
and understand the languages 
and cultures of their countries 
and peoples. 

Swartz introduced the annual 
April International Festival to 
the Quincy Schools and has 
directed this for the past three 
years. 

In 1972^ Swartz was selected 



by the Leaders of American 
Secondary Education as Leader 
of American Secondary 
Education for 1972. His 
biography and record of 
accomplishments appeared in 
the 1972 edition of Leaders of 
American Secondary Education 
and "his contributions to the 
advancement of secondary 
education and service to the 
community" were recognized. 

Swarts has had many articles 
on education published and is 
the author of the novel "All Her 
Paths Are Peace" published in 
1969. 

Swarts holds an A.B. from 
Williams College, an A.M. in 
Modern Languages from Harvard 
University and has done 
graduate work at Boston 
College, Boston University, 
University of Texas. 



4 From Quincy Complete Alcohol Studies 



Four Quincy professionals 
recently completed a course of 
study at the fifth annual New 
England School of Alcohol 
Studies held at Assumption 
College in Worcester. 

Paula Flaherty, 
secretary-counselor at South 
Shore Council on Alcoholism, 
Kathryn Hogan, counselor at 
Alcohol Clinic Without Walls, 



c/o South Shore Mental Health 
Center, Eleanor Tormey, R.N., 
staff nurse at Quincy 
Detoxification Center, and 
Charles McCourt, Counselor at 
Quincy Detoxification Center 
numbered among 69 Bay Staters 
to participate in the five-day 
alcohol studies program. 

Leading authorities in the 
field of alcohol problems 



WOLLASTON 
CREDIT UNION 

PERSONAL & AUTO LOANS 
NO NOTICE SAVINGS ACCTS 
EARN 5y.% PER ANNUM 



60/ PER 
/o ANNUM 



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SPECIAL 
NOTICE 

REM. KSTATE-MORTGACF.S 
HOME IMPROVE.\iE.\TS 

M.l. ACCOUNTS FULLY INSURED 
UNDER LAW BY .MASS.C.U. 
SHARE IN'SURA.NfCE CORP. 



SOUTH SHORE 
SEWING MACHINE CO. 

We Service All Makes Sewing 
Machines and Vacuum Cleaners 
665A Hancock St., WoUaston 
471-5982 



presented a series of short, 
intensive courses relating to the 
issues of alcohol and alcoholism. 

Participants in the program 
represented governmental 
agencies and businesses from the 
six New England states and from 
North Carolina, Iowa and New 
Jersey. 

Next year's school will be 
held at the University of 
Vermont in Burlington. 



651 HANCOCK ST., 
WOLLASTON 
773-3500 773-8600 

OPEN MON. THURS. 9 8 TUES., WED.. FRt. 9-5 




INDOOR FLAGS OUTDOOR 
ACCESSORIES 

FLAGS MADE TO ORDER 

State Flags Church Flags 

Flags of All Nations 

EAGLE FLAG CO., INC. 

147 Beach St., Wollaston, Mats. 02170 

Tel 617-4728242 






^^''!^. 




% 



THE 

MASSACHUSETTS MEDICAL 

SOCIETY 

»T*« retMirAV •0«TON MASSACHUftTTtllTIt lir^MUr 



Thursday, July 25, 1974 Quincy Sun Page 15 



Business News 



Shipbuilders Shareholders Vote 
New Name Presidential Cooperative 



Spahn Studio Of Music 
Opens In Wollaston Monday 



Daniel M. Spahn of Wollaston, 
announces the opening of the 
Spahn Studio of Music at 658 
Hancock St., Wollaston. 

The studio offers music 
instruction in all styles and levels 
of piano, organ, guitar, and 
electric bass. Small classes will 
also be offered in contemporary 
music theory, arranging, and 
composition. 

Spahn, a 1971 graduate of 
Miami University in Oxford, 
Ohio, received his Bachelor of 



Music Education degree and 
came to Boston to study 
arranging and composition at the 
Berklee College of Music. Spahn 
also studied with George 
Shearing and worked with Dave 
Brubeck in the recording of 
Brubecks first Oratorio, "A Light 
in the Wilderness". 

Named assistant to the 
Director of Music Education for 
the Wurlitzer Co., Spahn left 
Berklee to begin his teaching 
career. 



The shareholders at 
Shipbuilders Co-operative Bank 
have unanimously voted to 
change the bank's name to 
Presidential Co-operative Bank. 

Frank McCauley, president of 
the bank, said, "The name 
'Presidential' is in character with 
the city of Quincy: the 
birthplace of presidents." 



He explained that the name 
"Shipbuilders Co-operative" had 
been a restrictive one for the 
bank: 

"We are not affiliated with 
the shipyard. People used to 
think they had to be a shipyard 
worker to do business here. And 
with new people coming into the 
city, we felt that the name 



would be keeping away potential 
customers." 

The official effective date of 
the name-change is Monday, 
Sept. 16. Prior to that date, 
McCauley said that a notice will 
be sent to the Commissioner of 
Banks and to the Secretary of 
State to attain routine 
confirmation of the change. 



Hancock Bank Reports Net Income Up 



'Odyssey Of Jeremey Jack^ At 
Lincoln-Hancock School Aug. 21 



A meeting was held at the 
home of state representative 
candidate, Joyce Baker of 162 
Warren Ave., Wollaston, to 
formulate plans for an Aug. 21, 
10:30 a.m. presentation of "The 
Odyssey of Jeremey Jack" by 
the South Shore Music Circus 
Players at the Lincoln-Hancock 
Community School. 

The play, about a turtle who 
does not like his shell, is suitable 
for children from three to nine 
years of age. 

Admission is free for West 
Quincy and Wollaston children 
and a tour of the school for 
mothers is included. Balloons 
and lollipops will be distributed. 
Complimentary tickets are 
available by calling any of the 
following: Anne Greene 

Patricia Mclodv 
Appointed Notary 

Patricia A. Melody of 437 
Willard St., West Quincy has 
been appointed as a Notary 
Public, announces State 
Secretary John F. X. Davoren. 
Confirmation of the new 
appointee was made at a meeting 
of the Executive Council 
following submission of the 
nomination by Governor 
Sargent. 




AIRPORT 

17 DAILY TRIPS 
Hourly Service 



BROCKTON 
RANDOLPH 

Holiday Inn ... 

BRAINTftEC 

Sheraton Tare . . 

EAST MIITON SQ. 

Granit* Av«.. . . 



«6 

$4 






395-8080 




773-8583, Kay Borek 479-2469, 
Norma Gacicia 479-3498, or 
Mrs. Baker at lll-llX^. 

Other members of the 
committee include Cathy 
Roberts, Margaret Richardson, 
Audrey Wilcoxin and Donna 
Roberts. 



Hancock Bank reports net 
income for the second quarter 
up 32 percent over that realized 
for the first quarter of this year. 

Second quarter net income 
was $256,923 compared to 
$193,949 earned for the first 
quarter of 1974, up $62,974, 
according to William E. Kelley, 
president. 

Mary Sweeney 
Reappointed Notary 

Mary C. Sweeney of 17 
Charlesmount Ave., Quincy 
Point, has been reappointed as a 
Notary Public State Secretary 
John F. X. Davoren announces. 



KCt^.„ 



Kelley said also that Hancock 
Bank assets on June 30 reached 
$84,818,000 up nearly $2.5 
miUion over June 30, 1973 when 
they stood at $82,443,000. 

Cash dividends paid so far the 
first six months this year 



totalled 80 cents per share 
compared to 70 cents per share 
for the same period last year, 
Kelley said. 

Hancock Bank, based in 
Quincy, has 14 offices 
throughout Norfolk County. 



SPAHN STUDIO of MUSIC 

Piano - Organ - Guitar 
Electric Bass 

Expert instruction in all styles and levels 
)For further information and registration please call 472-5717 

^658 Hancock St. Wollaston! 



From 



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Whatever your shopping 
needs the Wollaston area 
has a lot to offer. The 
Shopping Center is 



conveniently located at 
the corners of Hancock, 
Beach and Beale Streets. 
The stores listed on this 



page offer a wide variety 
of services and 
merchandise from 
Cameras, Insurance, Hair 



ALLAN'> TAPE & STEREO CTR. 

16 Beale St. 472-9698 
Open Daily 10 to 9 
Sat. Till 6 

ANDREA'S GIFT SHOPPE 

19A Beale St. 472-9697 
Open Man. thru Sat. 9:30 to 5 
Arlyne Bearse and Grace Lutsky 

ARLENE'S BAKERY 

9 Beale St. 472-4025 
\Daily Bakery Specials 
]2 Large I'A lb. Loaves of Bread .99<f 

BARRY'S DELICATESSEN 

21 Beak St. 472-3322 
Open Till 6:30 Daily 

BEACON CLEANSERS 

624 Hancock St. 773-7400 
Open 7 A.M. to 6 P.M. 
CARITA COIFFEURS 

29A Beale St. 471-6611 

Open .5 Days, Thurs. & Fri. Till 9 

COLONIAL FEDERAL SAVINGS 
AND LOAN ASSOCIATION 

15 Beach St. 471-0750 
8 to 6 Weekdays, 8 to 7:30 Thursdays 
COTTAGE PAINT & WALLPAPER 
652 Hancock St. 479-7169 
Oven 9 to 5:30 - Thurs. & Fri. Till 9 



FRANK EVANS CO. INC. 

343 Newport Ave. 479-1014 
Open 8 to 5 Daily 

GRANITE 5^ TO $1.00 

7 Beale St. 
Frank & Bob Braga 
Open 9:30 to 5:30 Fri. Till 8 
GREETING CARD SHOP 

15 Beale St. 472-1987 
Open 9:30 to 5:30 

HANCOCK BANK & TRUST CO. 

20 Beale St. 773-0500 

Open Thurs. 6 to 8 - Lobby 9 to 3 

Drive-Up 8:30 to 4:30 Daily 

HAPPY CHEF 

661 Hancock St. 472-9444 
Open Every Evening 

KEY TO ELEGANCE 

831 Hancock St. 471-2323 

Open 9:30 to 9 Fridays 

9:30 to 5 Daily, Except Friday 
LINCOLN PHARMACY 

716 Hancock St. 472-4246 

A. R. Murphy Jr., Reg. Pharm. 

Open Daily 8 to 9 Sun. 8 to 6 
MUG'N-MUFFIN 

31 Beale St. 472-9641 

Open 7 A.M. to Midnite 



Styling, Music, 
Restaurants, Home 
Decorating and 
Remodeling, Cards and 
Gifts, 

NOBLE'S CAMERA SHOP 

680 Hancock St. 773-6077 
Open 9:30 to 6 Daily, Fri. Till 8 

PURITY SUPREME 

615 Hancock St. 
Open Every Evening 

RAFAELA COIFFEURS 

672 Hancock St. 472-9229 
Open Thurs. 9 to 9 - Daily 9 to 6 
Closed Mondays 

SCHULTZ, DOYLE & STODDARD INC. 

624 Hancock St. 472-4800 

SOUTH SHORE NATIONAL BANK 

Clay & Chapman Sts. 471-0361 
Open Friday Till 7:30 

WOLLASTON CREDIT UNION 

651 Hancock St. 773-3500 
Open Man. d Thurs. Till 8 



"Protection That Never Sleeps" 
BERRY INSURANCE AGENCY INC. 

General Insurance 

Brokers 

All Types Of Insurance 

671 HANCOCK ST., QUINCY 479-5500 



President: 
Sec'y-Treas: 
Recording Sec'y 
Directors: 



WOLLASTON DONUT SHOPPE 

17 Beale St. 479-1806 
Open 6 to 6 Daily 

WOLLASTON MUSIC and HOBBY SHOP 

27 Beale St. 773-5325 

Open Daily Till 5:30, Man. & Tues. Till 8 

Officers and Directors of the Wollaston Business 
and Professional Association 
Irving Boyes - Schultz, Doyle & Stoddard Inc. 
Bernice R. King - N. J. Riggs & Son 
E. Sarto Minihan - Ret. - Affial. So. Shore Nat'l Bank 
Daniel R. Barry - Barry's Deli 
Henry G. Berry - Berry's Ins. Agcy Inc. 
Frank Crotty - General Business Services 
A. L. Hallberg - Purity Supreme 
Jack Lydon - Lydon-Russell Funeral Home 
Elden Meady - Harmon Plumbing 
Ronald Neilsen - South Shore National Bank 
Harold Robbins • Robbins Garage 



Page 16 Quincy Sun Thursday, July 25, 1974 

Janice Lamparelli Miss Quincy Bay Race Week 



Pageant Winner Advises Youth To Do What Is Right 



By MARY ANN DUGGAN 

She could easily be the girl 
from Ipanema. She's tall, she's 
tan, she's young, and she's 
lovely. 

She's Janice Lampa-elli, the 
brown-eyed brunette who was 
crowned Miss Quincy Bay Rai'e 
Week of 1^)74 before a crowd 
estimated at more thant 4.000 at 
a papcjiit in downtown Quincy. 

"it was like being m a 
dream." said the willowy, 
eiL'litooii-year-oid winner. "The 
response of the crowd made me 
so excited. Inside 1 was saying, 
'Thank-you. people' " 

Janice who was selected from 
a field of 28 contestants is the 
second oldest in a family of five 
children. She says that her 
parents. Mr. and Mrs. Joseph 
Lamparelli of 20 Robertson St., 
West Quincy, and her three 
brothers and one sister, are "a 
very close family." 

Yet Janice is still eager to 
enter Gordon College this fall 
where she will study to be an 
elementary school teacher. 

Janice vied for the title of 
Miss Quincy Bay Race Week 
dressed in a scooped-necked, 
lace-collared gown of purple, 
pink, and white flowers. During 
the bathing suit competition, she 
wore a one-piece white suit. 

All ten finalists were asked 
different questions which played 
an important part in the final 
judging. Janice was asked, "What 
advice do you have for today's 
youth.'' She answered; 

"They should be happy and 
do what they want as long as it's 
right and as long as their morals 
are right." 

The 5-5 winner entered the 
pageant just for fun. She said: 
"I thought it would be a lot 



of fun and excitement. ..And it 
was." 

Now that she has been 
crowned queen Janice said, "I 
am really looking forward to 
representing Quincy during Bay 
Race Week." 

During the summer, Janice is 
working part-time at Angelo's 
Super Market as a cashier. 

The pageant held Friday night 
in front of the Hancock Bank 
highlighted the three-day 
Sidewalk Bazaar sponsored by 
the Quincy Center Business and 
Professional Association. 

For winning the pageant, 
Janice received approximately 
$1,000 of the more than $3,000 
in prizes awarded to the winner 
and four runners-up. 

Runnersup were I 1 j Janet 
McConarty, 16, of 28 Barbour 
Terrace, Mcrrymount; (2) 
Rossana DiCenso, 18, of 29 
Viden Rd, South Quincy; (3] 
Pamela Mills, 17, of 29 Shaw 
Ave., Braintree and [4] Judith 
Owens, 21, of 409 Auburn St., 
Whitman. 

Five other finalists were Kim 
Affsa, 18, of 75 Lisle St., 
Braintree; Joanne Cirino, 16, of 
95 Assabet Rd, Merrymount; 
Barbara Ann Holder, 19, of 19 
Utica St., Adams Shore; Debbi 
King, 1 9, of 1 00 Geraldine Lane, 
Braintree and Laura Sorgi, 17, of 
18 Waldron Rd, Braintree. 

The field of contestants was 
narrowed from 29 to 28 when 
Lauri Meyers, 20, of C St., Hull 
dropped out. 

Judges for the pageant were: 

Judy Jacksina, public 
relations director of the South 
Shore Music Circus, Cohasset; 
Arthur Keough, professor of 
English and head of the Drama 
Department at Quincy Junior 




ONE REIGN BEGINS and another one ends as Janice Lamparelli, 18. of West Quincy. the new Miss 
Quincy Bay Race Week is crowned by last year's winner. Patricia Kelley of Quincy. 



College; William Munroe, 
president of the Quincy Bay 
Race Week Association; Regina 
Smith of Milton, Miss Quincy 
Bay Race Week of 1972 and 
Myron L. Wasserman, president 
of the Barbizon School of 
Modeling, Boston. 

Henry Bosworth of The 
Quincy Sun was pageant 
chairman and Kenneth P. Fallon, 
Jr. of WJDA was co-chairman. 
Fallon was also emcee for the 
pageant. Others on the 
committee were: 

Leslie Brierley, Hancock 
Bank; Raymond Cunningham, 




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representing the Quincy Bay 
Race Week Association; Philip 
Chase, Cummings; Remo 
DeNicola, South Shore 
Television and Appliance; Paul 
Hurley, Jr., Hurley Insurance; Al 



Kelly, Sir Speedy; Florence 
Kerrigan, Baskin-Robbins; 
Cecilia Letorney, Bottom's Up; 
Roberta Meade, Roberta's 
Fashio Shoppe and Jerry 
Morreale, Child World. 



5 Girls Share In Over 
$3,000 Worth Of Prizes 



As Miss Quincy Bay Race 
Week of 1974, Janice 
Lamparelli, 18, of 20 Robertson 
St., West Quincy, receives 
approximately $1,000 worth - 
or about one-third of the more 
than $3,000 in prizes awarded. 

The rest of the prizes went to 
the four runners-up. In addition 
all 28 girls in the pageant 
received necklace of a 
heart-shaped jade stone with 
gold chain from the Quincy 
Center Business and Professional 
.Association, sponsor of the 
pageant. 

Janice Lamparelli receives: 

• A $595 major modeling 
scholarship from the Barbizon 
School of Modeling, Boston. 

• A set of diamond earrings 
from Rogers Jewelry. 

• A beauty makeup kit from 
Barbizon School of Modeling. 

•a dress ensemble from Sears 
Roebuck. 

• A gift certificate from 
South Shore Television and 
Appliance. 

• A gift certificate from 
Remick's of Quincy. 

• A gift certificate from Child 
World. 

• A swimsuit from Colinan's 
Sporting Goods Store. 

• Two tickfls to a 
performance of hef'choice at the 
South Shore Mpsic Circus, 
Cohasset, from The Quincy Sun. 

• An ice cream ^birthday cake 
from Baskin-Robbins. 

In addition, Janice received a 
beautiful bouquet of American 
Beauty red roses from Clifford's 
Flower Shop and a handsome 
engraved trophy from the 
Quincy Center Business and 
Professional Association. 

During her reign over Quincy 
Bay Race Week she will wear a 
rhinestone-studded three-point 
crown donated by Bottom's Up. 

First runnerup Janet 
McConarty, 16, of 28 Barbour 



Terrace, Merrymount receives: 

• A $345 scholarship from 
the Barbizon School of 
Modeling. 

• A beauty makeup kit from 
the Barbizon School of 
Modeling. 

• A ladle's tote bag from 
Jason's Luggage & Music Shop. 

• A gift certificate from 
Cummings. 

• A gift certificate from Child 
World. 

• "The New World 
Encyclopedia of Cooking" from 
The Patriot Ledger. 

Second runnerup Rossana 
DiCenso, 18, of 29 Viden Rd, 
South Quincy, receives: 

• A $345 scholarship from 
the Barbizon School of 
Modeling. 

• A beauty makeup kit from 
the Barbizon School of 
Modeling. 

• A gift certificate from 
Lerner's. 

• A gift certificate from Child 
World. 

Third runnerup Pamela Mills, 
17, of 29 Shaw Ave., Braintree 
receives: 

• A beauty makeup kit from 
the Barbizon School of 
Modeling. -^ 

• A $25 savings bond from 
Hancock Bank. 

• A gift certificate from 
Remick's of Quincy. 

• A gift certificate from Child 
World. 

Fourth runnerup Judith 
Owens, 21, of 409 Auburn St., 
Whitman, receives: 

• A beauty makeup kit from 
the Barbizon School of 
Modeling. 

• A $25 savings bond from 
Hancock Bank. 

• A gift certificate from 
Remick's of Quincy. 

• A gift certificate from Child 
World. 



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Emcee Ken Fallon Gets 
Not'In 'Script Surprise 



Thursday, July 25, I9f4 Quincy Sun Pige 17 



Emcee Kenneth P. Fallon, 
Jr. of WJDA got a 

not-in-the-script surprise 
during the Miss Quincy Bay 
Race Week Beauty Pageant. 

Fallon had the program 
going along according to the 
planned schedule when 
Pageant Chairman Henry 
Bosworth of The Quincy Sun 
walked on stage and took the 
microphone from him. 

Fallon, s o m e. w h a t 
surprised, surrendered the 
mike and soon heard a special 
tribute. 

"1 would like to single Ken 
out for a lion's share of the 
credit for the success of the 
pageant the past three years," 



Bosworth said. "He has 
added a big touch of class." 

Bosworth then disclosed 
that it was Fallon's birthday 
and on behalf of the pageant 
committee presented him a 
gift. 

"This is really for your 
lovely and understanding 
wife, Dorothy," Bosworth 
said. "We know she is lovely 
and she must be 
understanding for letting you 
be up here the past three 
years surrounded by pretty 
girls." 

Then, through a 
pre-arranged signal, Baron 
Hugo's orchestra broke into 
"Happy Birthday To You" 
and the crowd joined in. 



How To Prolong 
That Summer Vacation 




For graduating high school 
seniors who would like to 
prolong their summer vacations, 
the Army has some good news. 

The Army has extended its 
Delayed Entry Program [DEP] 
from 180 days to 270 days. 

Local Army representative 
Sgt. Robert Nyland said in order 
to qualify for the program an 



applicant must .be a high school 
graduate or a senior scheduled to 
graduate who is enlisting for a 
specialty which requires a formal 
course of instruction. 

"DEP is a pretty good deal," 
he added. "It allows an applicant 
to sign up today and take up to 
nine months before reporting for 
duty." 



MAYOR AND FRIEND - Mayor Walter Hannon and Donald Duck greet youngsters during fifth annual 
Quincy Sidewalk Bazaar sponsored by the Quincy Center Business and Professional Association. Behind 
the mayor are QCBPA President Mark Bertman and QCBPA Executive Director John Murray in 
skimmers. 

Joseph Brophy Deployed To Middle East 



Navy Boatswain's Mate Third 
Class Joseph F. Brophy, son of 
Mr. and Mrs. Joseph F. Brophy 
of 156 Babcock St., Houghs 
Neck is deployed to the Middle 



East aboard the destroyer USS 
Mullinnix. 

He and his fellow crew 
members were commended for 
assisting a disabled French ship 




off the east coast of Africa. 

Brophy's wife, Irene, is the 
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. 
Edward Downey of 42 Keyes 
St., Quincy. * 



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Page 18 Quincy Sun Thursday, July 25, 1974 



QCA Board Election 
Set For July 30-31 



Elections will be held at the 
South West Community Center, 
372 Granite St., for 
representatives to the Quincy 
Community Action Board of 
Directors. 

Both voters and elected 
representatives must reside 
within the boundary lines of 
South West Quincy. This area is 
bounded on the north by Quarry 
St., continuing on Granite St. to 



the railroad line; on the east, by 
the railroad line and south to the 
Braintree line; from the railroad 
line west to the northbound lane 
of the Southeast Expressway, to 
Cross St. and north to Quarry 
St. 

Elections will be held on 
Tuesday, July 30 from 9:30 a.m. 
to 9 p.m. and on Wednesday, 
July 31 from 9:30 a.m. to 5 
p.m. 



Fire Dept. Receives $500 Check, 
Commendation From Grossman's 



The Quincy Fire Dept. has 
received a commendation and 
$500 check from Gros.sman's for 
its quick action in quelling the 
April fire at the Braintree 
warehouse. 

Everett Grossman said the 
check was donated to the fire 
department's relief fund "to 
contribute to the well-being of 



firefighters and their families." 
He said that through the 
efforts of the firefighters, only 
minimal damage was sustained 
to other buildings. Calling the 
firefighters men of "high 
calibre", Grossman said, "We are 
protected by the finest fire 
department to be found 
anywhere." 



William Walsh Appointed Notary 



WUliam F. Walsh of 282 
Franklin St., Quincy has been 

appointed a Notary PubHc 
announces State Secretary John 
F. X. Davoren. 



Confirmation was made at a 
meeting of the Executive 
Council following submission of 
the nomination by Governor 
Sargent. The term will expire ia 
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SUMMER WORKSHOP - Approximately 130 Quincy school teachers, program coordinators and 
administators are participating in a three-week voluntary workshop to develop the curriculum of Student 
Centered Learning System (SCLSl . Here, teachers listen to the opening address, kicking off a work-filled 
three weeks at the Quincy High School Method Center. 

[Robert Way wood Photo] 

120 Teachers In Summer 
Workshop To Refine Curriculum 



It's school in summer for 
three weeks this month for a 
volunteer corps of Quincy 
educators meeting in QHS's 
Quincy Method Center to 
develop and refine a system-wide 
curriculum. 

The taskforce is composed of 
120 teachers from kindergarten 
through 12th grade, 10 
discipline co-ordinators and 
several administrators, including 
School Supt. Lawrence P. 
Creedon, and his three assistant 
superintendents Maurice J. Daly, 
John A. Osterman, and William 
L. Phinney. 

Co-ordinating the whole 
three-week workshop are 
Phinney, who is in charge of 
instruction in the school system, 
and Miss Patricia L. Gorman, a 
math teacher working as a 
research assistant specializing in 
the Student-Centered Learning 
System [the SCLS) for the past 
year. 

Object of the workshop is to 
hammer out a detailed program 
of learning that is accurate, 
scholarly, and forward-looking. 

The groundwork for this 
year's efforts at curriculum 
development was laid last 
summer, when a group of 50 
teachers elaborated tentative 
statements of rationale for the 
various branches of learning, 
such as language arts, social 
studies, foreign language, and 
mathematics, as well as spelled 
out hundreds of specific 
performance objectives [SPO's]. 

Their productions were 
circulated and discussed among 
the other 800 educators 
throughout the system during 
the school year, 

A month before the 1974 
Workshop was convened, eight 
nationally recognized scholars 
visited the Quincy Public 
Schools to share th^jr 
evaluations of the literature 
produced by the first Workshop 
and to give a closer look at the 
entire SCLS, the over-all design 
for education in the System. 



Each of these experts, who 
came from campuses as distant 
as Berkley in California [Dr. 
James Moffet, language arts 
specialist] and as near as MIT in 
Cambridge [Charles P. 
Friedman, professor of physics] 
spent one or two days with the 
co-ordinators and faculty of 
their respective disciplines. Their 
criticisms, by and large 
constructive, according to 
Phinney, will spur and guide the 
efforts of the current Workshop. 

On the first two days of the 
session, all the Workshop 
participants, veteran -and neW", 
engaged in an in-service course, 
conducted by Richard K. 
Chrystal, Director of Staff 
Development, to review the 
principles of the SCLS and to 
practice composing SPO's, the 
smallest building blocks of a 
curriculum program. 

The . remainder of the week 
was devoted to articulating the 
rationale, the comprehensive 
concepts, and the general 
objectives of each particular 
discipline. 

The math teachers, for 
example, had as their task the 
job of justifying mathematics, 
identifying measurement as a 
comprehensive concept, and 
pinpointing the ability to 
measure and compare in 
standard units, as a general 
objective of their discipline. 

The next two weeks of the 
Workshop are set aside for 
establishing, composing, and 
coding thousands- -of specific 
performance objectives. 
According to the instruction 
manuals circulated at the start of 
the Workshop, these objectives 
must be simultaneously 
observable, clearly qualified, and 
measurable, if they are to 
Tacilitate individualized learning' 
and foolproof pedagogy. 

Every morning at 8. a.m.' 
sharp, the large task-force arrives 
at the re-modeled auditorium at 
Quincy High School~a carpeted 
and air-conditioned learning 
space that lends itself to a 



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variety of group arrangements. 
After drawing their cups of 
coffee, they settle in to their 
respective clusters-Early 
Childhood in the pit area, 
Phys-Ed along the right 
balcony-where they spend most 
cf the workday, which ends 
promptly at 1 p.m., reading, 
discussing, writing, or just 
ruminating. 

There may be occasional 
excursions called for to attend a 
clinic [for clarification and 
debate] in the right rear of the 
hall, or the whole group might 
reassemble to hearken to general 
communications from Mr. 
Phinney or Dr. Creedon as well 
as to view a slide presentation on 
the Goals of the Quincy Public 
Schools. 

The following is a breakdown 
of the several disciplines and 
specializations represented at the 
Workshop together with the 
name of the co-ordinator of that 
respective group, which may 
number as few as three or as 
many as 50. 

Language Arts and Social 
Studies, headed by Carl Deyeso; 
Early Childhood, headed by 
Wilfred Nolan; Arts and 
Humanities, headed by Walter 
Lunsman; Career Education, 
headed by Maurice Daly, Special 
Education, headed by Freida 
Dirks; Mathematics, headed by 
Thomas White; Science, headed 
by James Bready; Music, headed 
by Anthony Ferrante; Physical 
Education, headed by Kenneth 
Rickson, and Library Services, 
headed by Arthur Gillis and to 
whom belongs the job of 
codifying the SPO's. 

During the Workshop several 
secretaries, working in the 
enclosed cubicles along the left 
balcony of the Quincy Method 
Center, type out tidy copy of 
the day's proceedings . and 
manifold, stencils of the newly 
coined specific performance 
objectives. 

The final record of the 1974 
Summer Workshop on 
Curriculum Development will 
eventually be bound in booklets 
and distributed throughout the 
School System in the fall. Next 
summer will see further revision, 
refinement, and enrichment of 
the monumental work now in 
progress. 



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Sun home delivery route. 

Telephone: 471-3100 



Thunday. July 25. 1974 Quincy Sun Pafe 19 



Bigge$t Project Of Itt Kind 



$1 



Traffic improvements for 
Quincy under the TOPICS 
Program are expected to begin 
early next spring according to 
Geoffrey A. Davidson, Director 
of the Department of Planning 
and Community Development. 

The traffic safety program, 
which will result in 
approximately $1 million in 
improvements in Quincy, is 
probably the laigest project of 
this nature ever for Quincy, he 
said. 

The scope of the project 
includes Sea St., from Quincy 
Shore Drive to Southern Artery, 
Southern Artery from Sea St. to 
Washington St., and Washington 
St. from Southern Artery to the 
Fore River Circle. 

Now that conflicts regarding 
Southern Artery have been 
resolved, state officials and 
consultants are preparing 
construction documents for the 
full project. 

"Both Mayor Walter Hannon 
and the City Council, especially 
the Public Works Committee and 
its Chairman, Councillor Leo J. 
Kelly, are to be commended for 
guiding the resolution of this 
program which will be the 
largest single traffic safety 
project in Quincy's history," 
Davidson said. 

New trafflc signals, fully 
funded with federal assistance, 
will be constructed at Sea St. 
and the Department of Public 
Works exit. Southern Artery and 
Broad St., Southern Artery at 
Field St. and Brackett St., 
Southern Artery and Pond St., 
Southern Artery and Edison 
Park, Southern Artery and River 
St., Washington St. at St. 
Joseph's Church and Washington 
St. and South St. 



Million In Traffic Improvements In Spring 



Both the comer at 
Washington St. and Baxter St. 
and Southern Artery and Sea St. 
at the Quincy Police Station will 
be widened to permit smoother 
traffic movement. 

In addition, signals at Sea St. 
and Quincy Shore Drive, Sea St. 
and Coddington St., Southern 
Artery and McGrath Highway, 
Southern Artery and Washington 
St., and Washington St. and 
Chubbuck St. will be completely 
reconstructed. 

This work alone, costing close 
to $500,000, will result in safer, 
smoother and better controlled 
traffic flow, especially through 
those sections of Ward 1 and 
Ward 2, Davidson said. 

In addition, because of 
restrictions placed on traffic 
flow by the City Council, 
maximum speeds attained would 
be 30-35 miles per hour all along 
the travel corridor. Also, major 
road work would be 
accomphshed with federal funds. 
Sea St. from Quincy Shore Drive 
to Southern Artery will be 
completely resurfaced and 
Southern Artery from Sea St. to 
Washington St. will be 
completely resurfaced. 

Also, the intersection of 
Quincy Shore Drive and Sea St. 
will be reconstructed to improve 
pedestrian and traffic safety as 
will Sea St. at Coddington St., 
and Southern Artery at 
Coddington St. 

"In all, the go-ahead given to 
this program by the Mayor and 
City Council represents a 
significant attempt to improve 
traffic-pedestrian safety in 
Quincy," Davidson said. "We are 
hopeful that the project will be 
under construction as early as 
next spring. 



Railroad Bridge Removed 

Sheets Asks Floatable 
Debris To Stop 
Quarry Swimming 



In a letter to Mayor Walter J. 
Hannon, Ward 4 Councillor 
James A. Sheets has asked that 
the city-owned Granite Railway 
and the Swingles Quarries in the 
West Quincy area be filled with 
floatable demohtion material as 
soon as possible to reduce the 
number of accidents. 

In his letter to Mayor Hannon 
Councillor Sheets points out 
that as long as the abandoned 
quarry holes remain a swimming 
attraction for young people 
there will be accidents with 
Quincy firefighters and rescue 
workers sharing the dangers 
while responding to rescue calls. 

Sheets said: 

"Fencing would not 
accomplish our purpose and 
there is already a substantial 
amount of floating demolition 
material in the Granite Railway 
Quarry which limits swimming 
to one area." 

A teen-aged Dorchester girl 
rescued from atop a ledge of 
Swingle's Quarry, West Quincy, 
was reported to be in good 
condition at the Quincy City 
Hospital from which she is to be 
released shortly. Miss Lena E. 
Syliboy, 15, of 34 High St., 
Dorchester, was rescued from 
the ledge by the Quincy Fire 
Department rescue team 
Saturday. Being treated for head 
injuries she is listed in 
satisfactory condition. 

At Sheets' request the old 
railroad bridge between the 
Granite Railway Quarry and 
Swingles Quarry has been 
removed to protect the public. 

However he cited the fact that 
the old railroad bridge and the 
grout pile which still remains at 



the Granite Railway Quarry are 
two of the most hazardous perils 
for the young people in the 
quarry area. ^ 

Public Works Commissioner 
James J. Riccuiti has been 
negotiating with the J. F. White 
Contracting Company of 
Newton with the hope that they 
might be able to use the Quarry 
tailings ( grout 1 in return for 
removing them at no cost to the 
city. 

However company officials 
pointed out that it would be a 
difficult and dangerous job if the 
city were to contract the job. A 
projected cost of between 
$50,000 and $75,000 was 
estimated. Plans are underway to 
work with the Appalachian 
Mountain Club to erect vandal 
proof signs of the danger of rock 
slides citing the fact that five 
lives have been lost in this area. 



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THE RENEGADES, Quincy's crack drum and bugle corps, perform off Granite St. during fifth annual 
Sidewalk Bazaar. 

No Pollution In Water 
Samples At Houghs Neck 



Dr. Alfred Mahoney, Quincy's 
health commissioner, reports 
that alleged contaminated water 
in Houghs Neck "does not show 
pollution." 

The water borders Edgewater 
Drive and Rock Island Road. 

Rep. Thomas F. Brownell 
received several complaints from 
residents, that young children in 
this area had become sick. He 
wrote a letter July 19 to George 
J. Coogan, director of the 
Bureau of Water Supply and 
Water Safety, requesting "an 
immediate evaluation of the 
area." 

Gerald McCall, assistant to 



Coogan, said that the water 
"meets minimum standards for 
safe bathing." He also said that a 
study has never been made to 
coordinate water quality and the 
incidence of disease. 

Dr. Mahoney twice sampled 
the water in the culvert near 
Edgewater Drive and Rock 
Island Rd. According to Dr. 
Mahoney, both coliform counts - 
tests to determine the amount of 
pollution, if any, in the water - 
were below the 1000-mark 
considered safe: one count was 
420, the other 250. 

Dr. Mahoney noted that the 
water was stagnant in the culvert 
area. He said, however, that the 



problem could be remedied by 
opening the channel into 
Edgewater Drive. 

Brownell had not received a 
reply to his letter on Tuesday. 
He said, "I want quick action on 
this matter because kids are 
using that area every day. The 
problem is to locate the source 
of the pollution." 

McCall added that the 
shellfish section in the area was 
closed last year. "During heavy 
rainfalls there was a high total of 
coliform in combined sewerage 
overflows," he said. 

He noted, however, that there 
was "no direct discharge of 
sewage" in the bathing area. 



CITY OF QUINCY 
VOTER REGISTRATION DATES 



EVENINGS FROM 7:00 P.M. to 9:00 P.M. AT THE 

FOLLOWING LOCATIONS: 
Monday, August 5, 1974 

Ward 2 - Fore River Club House, Nevada Rd 
Ward 3 - St. John's School, Phipps St. 
Ward 4 - Gridley Bryant School, Willard St. 

Tuesday, August 6, 1974 

Ward 5 - Wotlaston School [Auditorium] Beale St. 
Ward 6 - Quincy School, Newbury Ave. 

Saturday, August 10, 1974 

City Hall - Hancock St. 
From 10:00 A.M. Until 10:00 P.M. 

Tuesday, August 13, 1974 
City Hall ■ Hancock St. 
From 8:30 A.M. to 10:00 P.M. 

This being the last day for Registration before the 
State Primaries September 10, 1974 

REGISTRATION DAILY. ELECTION DEPT., CITY HALL. FROM 8:30 A.M. 
UNTIL 4:30 P.M. MONDAY THRU FRIDAY 

John M. Gillis 

Clerk, Board of Registrars 






}i 



Page 20 Quincy Sun Thursday, July 25, 1974 

1,011 Game Winner 

Rosie The Whiz Here Friday 



The fabulous Eddie Feigner 
and his four-man softball team, 
The King and his Court, have 
appeared in Quincy several times 
in the past, but Friday night at 8 
p.m. at the Quincy YMCA's 
Rotary Field, Quincy and South 
Shore fans will get a look at the 
female counterpart of this 
spectacular attraction. 

The unbelievable Rosie Black 
and her California-based Queen 
and her Maids, will pit their 
four-girl softball team against 
the WBZ Bombers in a benefit 
game sponsored by Quincy Y. 

Rosie, a 22-year-old blonde, 
in the last nine years has won 
1,011 games while Idling only 
44, pitching 10 games a week, 
struck out 18,462 batters, 2,494 
while pitching from second base, 
•3,165 while donning a blindfold, 
and 1,244 while pitching from a 
kneeling position. She has 
pitched 182 no-hitters, recorded 
71 perfect games, and has 234 
shutouts. 

All this was accomplished 
with only a catcher, first 
baseman and shortstop. 

Rosie's 19-year-old sister, 
Eileen Beaird, catches, Debbie 
Bevers, a statuesque 22-year 
older, plays first base and Lotta 
Chatter, the comic of the 
troupe, plays shortstop with the 
best while keeping the audience 
laughing and at the same time 
astounds them with unusual ball 
handling feats of skill. 

The squad has traveled all 
over the world and appeared in 
the syndicated "Believe it or 
Not" column. It has just 
returned from an extensive tour 
of Venezuela and other South 
and Central American countries. 

Many of the victories have 





2 Quincy Babe Ruth 

All Star Teams 
To Play In Canada 



Two teams of Quincy Babe 
Ruth League all-stars will play 
games in Canada on Aug. 3, 4 
and 5. 

The American League will 
play Peabody, Ontario, and the 
National League will meet a 
team from Toronto in their first 
games. Games will be in 
Kingston, Ontario. 

The two teams leave Quincy 
Friday midnight, Aug. 2 by bus 
from Morrisette Post parking lot. 

The American League all-stars 
will comprise Ed Daley, Bob 
Pettinelli, Jim Maze, Mike 
Kennedy, Mark Buchanan, Gary 
Oriola, John Wilkinson, Mike 
Boyle, Sal Coscia, Ray Coscia, 
Len Picot, Peter Nioso, Kurt 
O'Sullivan, John Govoni and 
Dan Sandonato. 



On the National League stars 
will be Bobby Glavin, Dave 
McLaughUn, Brian Kelly, Bob 
Stack, Brian Djerf, Paul Barry, 
John Fitzgerald, Brian Ready, 
Steve Cook, John Sylvia, Bob 
Ceruvels, John Ferris, Don 
Perdios, Mike Murphy and Rick 
Boyle. 

Quincy will have the only 
American teams in the tourney 
which will include four entries 
from Quebec and eight from 
Ontario. 

Sal Salvatore, who is paying 
the entry fee for both teams, 
will manage the National League 
stars, while Joe Wilkinson will 
manage the American Leaguers. 
A party of 70 will make the trip 
to Canada by car and bus. 



S.S. Babe Ruth Seniors 
In State Tournament 



ROSIE BLACK 



been over outstanding men's 
teams and Rosie has struck out 
such major league notables as 
three of four Amazing Mets the 
year they won the World Series. 
She once faced Willie Mays and 



retired him on a pop fly. He 
later said she was one of the best 
pitchers he had faced. 

Her fast ball has been clocked 
at a speed of more than 90 miles 
per hour. 



The South Shore Senior Babe 
Ruth League All-Stars, with four 
Quincy players in the lineup, 
will play in the double 
elimination state championships 
Saturday and Sunday in Dennis 
Port after breezing to the 
regional title last weekend with 
two straight wins over the 
Central Mass. stars. 

South Share received 



back-to-back three-hit pitching 
performances, with Quincy's 
Gerry Bugden striking out 1 5 in 
the opening game and Scott Tait 
of Hanover fanning 12 in the 
second game. 

South Shore won the opener, 
6-1, and the second game, 4-0, 
with excellent hitting and 
fielding by Bugden, Tom 
Magjerio of South Boston and 
Bruce Kirkland of Randolph. 



City Swimming Schedule 



Thursday, July 25 - high tide 
4:58, beach hours 2-7, non-swim 

I & II 2-2:30, beg. I & II 6-6:30, 
Adv. beg. 5:30, intermediate 1 & 

II 3, swim 5, advanced swim and 
hfe saving 4-5. 

Friday, July 26 - high tide 
5:53, beach hours 3-8, non-swim 
I& II 3-3:30, beg. I & II 7-7:30, 
Adv. beg. 6:30, intermediate I 4, 
' intermediate II 4:30, swim 6, 
advanced swim and life saving 
5-6. 

Monday, July 29 - high tide 
8:31, beach hours 8-12, 
non-swim I 11, non-swim U 
11:30, adv. beg. 10:30, 
intermediate I 9:30, 
intermediate II 10, swim 9, 
advanced swim and life saving 
8-9. 

Tuesday, July 30 - high tide 
9:29, beach hours 8-12:30, 
non-swim I 12:30, non-swim II 



12, beg I 11:30, beg II 11, Adv. 
beg. 10:30, intermediate I 10, 
intermediat II 9:30, swim 9, 
advanced swim and life saving 
8-9. 

Wednesday, July 31, high tide 
10:19, beach hours 8-1, 
non-swim I 12, non-swim II 
12:30, beg 1 11, beg. II 11:30, 
adv. beg. 10:30, intermediate I 
8, intermediate II 8:30, swim 
10, advanced swim and hfe 
saving 9-10. 



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• Senior League 

Clovers In 4-4 Tie 
With Top Budmen 



Thursday, July 25, 1974 Quincy Sun Page 21 / 



The Quincy Clovers, turning 
in one of their better 
performances of the season, held 
the unbeaten Boston Budmen to 
a 4-4 tie last week in the 
Summer Senior Hockey League 
at the Quincy Youth Arena, 
putting the first blemish on the 
Boston team's otherwise perfect 
record. 

Frankie Guest put Quincy 
ahead at !:55 of the game with 
an unassisted goal but Boston's 
Jim Doyle tied it at 9:34 with an 
urrassisted goal. 

The Budmen took a 3-1 lead 
with two second period goals 
but Dennis O'Connell scored for 
Quincy early in the third period. 
Doyle scored again for Boston 
but Guest scored at 515:04 with 
P. J. Flaherty and John Cunniff 
assisting, and Cunniff tied it at 
16:41 with Flaherty having an 
assist. 

The second place Newman 
Club defeated Whitman Cats, 
7-4, and third place Atlantic 
Flames bombed the Walpole 
Chiefs, 14-4. 

Next Wednesday Boston will 
play Newman Club at 6:30, 
Whitman will meet Walpole at 
8:15 and Quincy will face 
Atlantic at 10 p.m. 



SENIOR STANDINGS 

i, W L T Pts. GF GA 

Boston 

Budmen 5 111 38 19 
Newman 

Club 4 11 9 38 29 
Atlantic 

Flames 3 3 6 39 20 
Quincy 

Clovers 2 3 1 5 27 30 
Whitman 

Cats 14 1 3 26 35 
Walpole 

Chiefs 15 2 22 46 

THE SCORING LEADERS 

D UT. G A Pts. 

Bob Ferriter, 

Newman Club 

Buddy Powers, 



Budmen 
Vic Stanfield, 

Budmen 
Dan Sullivan, 

Flames 
P. J. Flaherty, 

Clovers 
Vic Puntiri, 

Flames 
Brian Leahy, 

Flames 
Jim Doyle, 

Budmen 
Frank Guest, 

Clovers 
Dick Osborne, 

Newman Club 



8 7 

4 II 

5 8 
■8 4 

1 11 

7 4 



6 

5 
9 

3 



5 
6 
1 
7 



15 
15 
13 
12 
12 
11 
11 
11 
10 
10 



• Executive League 

Blues, Reds In Wins 



In the Summer Executive 
Hockey League at Quincy Youth 
Arena, the Blue team defeated 
the Golds, 7-4, as Jack Powers, 
who the previous week had five 
goals, this time came up with 
five assists. 

The Golds tooi: a 3-0 lead on 
goals by Ed Dwyer, Ed Holt and 
Gene Irwin and assists for Pete 
LaBerge, Jack Hurley and Joe 
Ryan. The Blues came back to 
make it 3-2 after a period as 
Kevin White scored with assists 
for Gary DeCoste, Powers and 
Marty Tolson and DeCoste 
scored with Powers and Tolson 
assisting. 

After a scoreless second 
period the Blues exploded for 
five goals in the final period. 
Tolson tied it at 3-3 with Powers 
and DeCoste assisting and 
Tolson put the Blues ahead with 
assists for Powers and Wayne 
Cooper. The Golds scored their 



final goal to tie it when Charlie 
Duffy scored and LaBerge 
assisted. 

The Blues then won it on 
goals by White (Powers and 
Tolson assisting] , DeCoste 
unassisted and Tolson with 
White assisting. 

The Reds defeated the 
Greens, 5-1, scoring all their 
goals in the second period. 

Bucky Zanardelli scored the 
first goal with Jim Daley and Joe 
Chase assisting, Fran Moriarty 
had the second with an assist for 
Dick Reinhardt, Moriarty scored 
again with Wally McLean 
assisting, Chase made it 4-0 with 
assists for Daley and Zanardelli 
and Daley scored the finale with 
Zanardelli and McLean having 
assists. 

Tom Boussy scored the lone 
Green goal in the final period 
with Frank Furey having the 
assist. 




PLAZA OLDS Bantam team finished fourth in the St. Ann's Youth Hockey League. Front, from left, 
John Mulcahy, Karl Olson, Pete Prasinos, Bob Carroll, Tom McNamara, Chuck Winters and Gary Stokes. 
Back, Denis Djerf, Steve Clinton, Ricky Carroll, Coach Dan Carroll, Ricky Collins, Coach Myron Gale, 
Mike Flannery, Pete Orlando, Brian McMahon and Mike DeFazio. Missing is Rich Carpenter. 

•Bantam House 

Greens Still Undefeated, 
Orange Bombs Reds 



In the Bantam House League 
the Greens remained unbeaten 
[5-0-1 1 with a 6-2 win over the 
Whites. John McConville had 
two goals, Mark Donovan, Tom 

Pistorino, Dave Lewis and Chris 
Erikson one each. Erikson and 
Sean Jago had two assists apiece, 
John Urbanus, Lewis, Leo Doyle 
and McConville one each. Bob 
Collins and Pete Golden scored 

^ Squirt House 



for the Whites with Collins and 
Mike Bennett having assists. 

The Orange team blasted the 
Reds, 8-0, with John Newcombe 
having the hat trick, Paul Palmer 
two goals, Don Perdios, Mike 
Storer and Mike Noone one 
each. Palmer, Noone, Charles 
Hogan and Pat Bamberry each 
had two assists, Storer and Kevin 
McGrath one apiece. 

The Yellows and Blues played 



to a 4-4 tie. Tommy Brennan 
had the hat trick and Bobby 
Hayes one goal for the Yellows 
with Bob Molloy having three 
assists, Bryan McGilvary and 
Hayes one each. Lou Mathews 

had two goals for the Blues and 
Ray Coleman and Ed Kane one 
each with assists for Kevin 
Welch, Coleman, Steve Campbell 
and Mike VanTassell. 



Whites Tie Greens To Stay Top 



In the Squirt House League 
the White team stayed in first 
place by tying the runnerup 
Greens, 7-7, in a free-scoring 
game. 

Bobby Ready had the hat 
trick for the Whites, Paul 
McCabe had two goals and Keith 
Blaney and Mike O'Hare one 
apiece. Brian Mock, Kevin 
Lydon, O'Hare, McCabe and 
Ready had assists. 

For the Greens Mike Marshall 



scored twice and Rich 
O'Sullivan, Joey Engrassia, 
Kevin Chase, Tommy Murphy 
and Kevin Craig once each. Craig 
and Ricky Miller had two assists 

apiece, Timmy McGrath, Chase 

and Marshall one each. 

The Reds edged the Orange 

team, 2-0, on goals by Chris 

Gorman and Kevin Duff. 

The Yellows topped the 

Blues, 8-5, with Mike Cullen and 

Dennis Furtado each scoring the 



hat trick for the Yellows and 
Kevin Greene and John Burm 
having the other goals. Furtado 
also had three assists and Cullen 
two, with Rosendo Castilla, 
Burm, Greene, Dave Ferreira, 
Tommy Schofield and Mike 
McArdle having one each. Mike 
Rafferty had the hat trick for 
the Blues and Bob Flynn and 
John Meade one goal each. 
Rafferty also had two assists and 
Flynn one. 



Smith, O'Neill Win Scotch Foursome 



In the weekly mixed Scotch 
foursome tourney at Furnace 

Brook Golf Club Dot Smith and 
Ed O'Neill shot low gross of 39. 



Joyce Robbins and Joe 
Barranco had low net of 29, 
there was a three-way tic for 
second net of 30 between 
Priscilla O'Neill and Bob Roche, 



Rena Hodges and Quentin 
McCaffrey and Pat Cugini and 

Joe DiFederico. Claire'Walsh and 
Dick Corbin shot fifth net of 3 1. 



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Page 22 Quincy Sun Thursday, July 25, 1974 

• Junior Baseball 



Sears Defeats VFW, 
2-0 In Extra Inning Thriller 



• Midget House 

Orange Team Moves 
Into Tie With Whites 



The Quincy Junior Baseball 
League closed out its regular 
season last Saturday with the 
most exciting game of the entire 
year. 

Sears Roebuck, American 
League champs with a 16-5 
record, met head-on with VFW, 
National League co-champs, 
with a lS-6 record, and Sears 
pulled out a 2-0 extra inning win 
on back-to-back home runs in 
the seventh inning. 

Bill Deitsch, starting pitcher 
for Sears, pitched one-hit ball, 
struck out 13 and walked only 
one, whUe Paul OToole of VFW 
pitched a no-hitter, struck out 
six and walked one during the 
regulation six innings. O'Toole 
also had the only hit during that 
time. 

By Little League rules, both 
pitchers had to come out after 
those stirring six innings and in 
the top of the seventh Deitsch 
greeted Danny Boyle with a 
home run over the fence in left 
center and the next batter belted 
one over the center field fence. 
Fred Palmer also singled but was 
erased on a fine play. 

In the bottom of the seve.ith 
good defensive plays by Bobby 
Flynn, Deitsch and catcher Dean 
Zoia saved the game for Sears 
and relief pitcher Steve Picot. 
O'Toole, incidentally, also 
doubled for VFW in the seventh. 



Deitsch finished up the season 
with an 8-0 pitching record, 
pitched six no-hit games, had 
12S strikeouts and only 13 
walks and gave up just six hits. 

Kiwanis edged Boston Gear, 
7-6, in extra innings with Billy 
O'Connell the winning pitcher. 
John Coleman had three hits, 
Billy O'Connell two hits, Jamie 
Walsh a triple and Billy Cooke 
drove in the winning run. For 
Gear John FeruUo and Bob 
Hayes each had two hits and 
Bob Dubois a homer and single. 

Kiwanis also walloped 
Colonial Federal, 15-3, with 
Chris Petrillo pitching excellent 
ball in relief of Sean Morton. 
O'Connell drove in four runs and 
Petrillo had two doubles. 

Houghs Neck blanked Rotary, 
6-0, with Greg Oriola the 
winning pitcher. Bob Cronin and 
Steve Notorangelo each having a 
double, and Greg Madden, Mike 
Abboud and Jeff Giordam 
having singles. 

Houghs Neck also blasted 
Kiwanis, 10-1, with Abboud the 
winning pitcher. Oriola, 
Giordani and Notorangelo had 
the key hits. 10-year old Frankie 
McPartland pulled off a brilliant 
unassisted double play. For 
Kiwanis Scott Lowell drove in 
the only run. 

Rotary collected 17 hits to 
wallop Burgin Plainer, 13-0, as 
all Rotary players played <nt least 



Final Standings 
AMERICAN LEAGUE 



Sears 

Houghs Neck 
Boston Gear 
Foley's 
Burgin Platner 
Remick's 



W 

17 
15 
10 

8 

6 

2 



5 
7 

12 
14 
16 
20 



NATIONAL LEAGUE 

W L 

Kiwanis 1 5 7 

VFW 15 7 

Keohane's 14 8 

Rotary 14 8 

Colonial Federal 11 11 

Elks 5 17 



three positions and played 
errorless ball behind the strong 
pitching of four pitchers, two of 
whom had never pitched before, 
10-year old Johnny Costigan, 
catcher Billy Burt and third 
baseman Richie Finnigan. 

Ten-year old Steve Pecevich 
had a triple and single, Gary 
DiNardo and Finnigan two 
doubles and a single each, Sean 
Murphy two doubles, Burt three 
singles and Costigan, Ronnie 
Pettinelli, Brian Donovan and 
Steve Sacchetti a single each. 



In the Midget House League 
the Orange team moved into a 
top tie with the Whites by 
edging the Greens, 5-4. Jim 
Constas had two goals, Jeff 
Harrison, Rick Bowe and Kevin 

Doyle one each for the Orange 
team with Constas and Harrison 
each having two assists and Bill 
Morrison one. For the Greens 
Mark Kelly had two goals, Brian 
Nevins and Bob Carmody one 
each. Joe Carty had two assists 



and Rich Troy one. 

The Whites and Reds tied, 
5-5, dropping the Reds into 
third place. Ed McDonald had 
two goals and Rick Boyle, Mike 
Sullivan and John Picard one 
each for the Reds. Dave Peters 
had two assists. For the Whites 
Mike McCauley had two goals, 
Bud Romano, Scott MitcheU and 
Mark Paolucci one each. Mike 
Boyle had two assists, Romano, 
Billy Monahan and Dennis 
Bertoni one apiece. 



• Pee Wee House 



League Leader Blues 
Tag Yellows, 6-3 



Lashen-Doherty, Faherty-Sagen Tie 



The first place Blue team 
defeated the Yellows, 6-3, for its 
fifth win in six games in the Pee 
Wee House League. 

Rich McCarthy and Mark 
Veasey each had two goals for 
the winners, Freddie Palmer and 
John Lyons one each. Mark 
Boussy had three assists. Bob 
Larsen two and Tommy Mullen 
one. For the Yellows Chris 
Chevalier scored twice and Jamie 
Rooney once with two assists 
for Jim Paolucci and one each 
for Mike Doherty and Tommy 
Heffernan. 

The Orange team nipped the 
Reds, 5-4, with Sean Dennis and 
John Bayhs each having two 



goals and Todd Leslie one. John 
Coleman, Robbie Zanardelli, Ed 
Doherty and Karl Nord scored 
for the Reds with assists for 
Zanardelli, Nord, Robbie Craig, 
Gene Kornas and Mike Ferreira. 
The Whites topped the 
Greens, 9-5, sparked by Mark 
Messina's three goals. Ed Powers, 
Paul Melia and Greg Freeman 
each had two goals. Ed 
McDermott and Messina had two 
assists apiece. Bill Mathews, 
Powers, Billy Doran, Melia and 
Freeman one each. For the 
Greens Chuckle Marshall 
exploded for four goals and Paul 
McGrath had the other. McGrath 
had three assists and Paul 
McConville two. 



The teams of Margie Faherty 
of WoUaston and Audrey Sager 
and Fay Lashen of Walpole and 
Jeanne Doherty tied for low 
gross of 83 in last week's ladies' 
member-guest tournament at 
Furnace Brook Golf Club. 

Low net of 59 was shot by 
Helen Novicki of WoUaston and 
Phyllis Whitman. Connie 
Harrison, unattached, and Pat 



Cugini had second net of 60. 
Eileen Baillie of Braintree and 
Phyllis Whitman and Carol 
Cornwell of Halifax and Jean 
Doherty tied for third net of 62. 
Bronsie Noviki of WoUaston 
and Phyllis Whitman and Sandi 
Robbins of Hatherly and 
Barbara Spinello tied for fifth 
net of 63, while Laura Lynch of 
Ponkapoag and Kay O'Leary and 



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Velma O'Connor of South Shore 
and Florence Eramo tied for 
seventh net of 65. 

Priscilla O'Neill of Furnace 
Brook came closest to the pin on 
the 15th hole and Velma 
O'Connor of South Shore had 
the longest drive on the 11th 
hole. 

Jeanne Doherty defeated Ellie 
Mulroy for Class A honors and 
Claire Walsh defeated Helene 
McPeck for the Class B crown in 
the Directors' Cup play. 

Chairman for the guest day 
was Priscilla O'Neill, while 
Barbara Spinello was in charge 
of luncheon and prizes. 



Hurley Scores 5 To Send 
Reds Into Mite Lead 



The Reds moved into first 
place in the Mite House League 
with an easy 8-1 win over the 
previous leader, the Orange 
team. 

Chris Hurley erupted for five 
Red goals, Dave Edgren had two 
and Billy Hughes one. Edgren 
and Jim Grossman each had two 
assists and Hughes one. Danny 
Kelly scored for the Orange 
team and Jeff Murphy assisted. 



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Staff 



HUBERT VOGELSINGER 

Boston Minutemen 
Head Coach 



NEIL NICOLL 

Eastern Nazarene College 
Head Coach 

STEVE SHOFF 

North Weymouth H. S. 
Varsity Coach 

BILL MAUGER 

All-New England Goalie 




Ages: Boys 12-17 



Location: Naples, Maine 



("■et ready for the soccer season. Join our outstanding staff 
of coaches, including Hubert Vogeisinger, Head Coach of the 
Boston Minutemen for a week of soccer fundamentals, 
games, films, and instruction. Transportation to and from 
camp is included in the S75. tuition. Water skiing is $5. extra. 

Write for an application to Crusader Camp, Box 39, 
Fastem Nazarene College, Quincy 02170, or call 773-6350, 
Ext. 325 between 1 - 5 p.m. Director, Jim Smith, Director of 
Athletics, ENC. 



The Greens walloped the 
Whites, 8-1, with Bobby McCabe 
scoreing four "goals, Mark 
McManus two, Bob Foreman 
and Gary Caruso one each. Mark 
Walsh had two assists, John 
O'Connor and McCabe one each. 
Brian Chase scored for the 
Whites with an assist for Mark 
Chambers. 

The Blues edged the Yellows, 
4-3, with Scott Messina having 
the hat trick and John DiPietro 
one goal for the winners. 
Brendan Walsh, John Krantz and 
Tom Ryan had assists. Paul 
Marshall had all three Yellow 
goals with Kevin Golden and 
Bob Kane assisting. 



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• Around The Buoys «^ 

3 Squantum Boats Lead 
Wollaston Interclub Race 



Thursday, July 25, 1974 Quincy Sun Page 23 

"■''■ ", ''^ •■'* 4^/* ^ '^jf^ 



By JAMES COLLINS 

The WoUaston Yacht Club 
hosted a record interclub 
turnout of 106 yachts as a 
prelude to the annual Quincy 
Bay Race Week which opens 
July 31. 

Three Squantum boats led the 
marine parade on the homeward 
stretch with top honors going to 
Jim Beaton's "Dream A-While" 
in the Flying Scot Class. 

Other winners included Dick 
Marcel's "Whirling Dervish" in 
the Tornado Class and Henry 
Welsh's "Bewitched" from the 
host club. Although the wind 
was light at the start of the race 
it strengthened from the easterly 
quadrant in the late afternooQ.' 

The summary: " ' '* 

FLYING SCOTS 

(Margin 10 min. 54 sec.) 

Dream-A-While, Jim Beaton, 



Squantum Y.C. 

No. 44, Jim Beaton, 
Squantum Y.C. 

No Nuffin', Arthur Sweeney, 
Squantum Y.C. 

TORNADO CLASS 
(Margin 4 min. 05 sec.) 

Whirling Dervish, Dick Marcel, 
(Wessagussettj . 

Twister, Jeff Kent 
(Wessagussettj . 

Sassafras, Jim Madde, Jr, 
(Wessagussettj . 



HUSTLERS 

(Winning Margin 2 min. 34 sec.j 

Bewitched, Henry Welsh, 
WoUaston. 

Rascal, Peter Hylen, 
Wollaston. 

Alibi II, John McMann, 
Wollaston. 



ETHCELL'S 22 
(Winning Margin 48 sec. J 
No. 76, Dick Randall, 
Wollaston. 

No. 79, Dr. Walter CoUins, 
Wollaston. 

No. 14, Bob Campbell, 
Wollaston. 
SQUANTUM YACHT CLUB 
TURNABOUT CLASS 

No. 1558, Margaret Durkin, 
1-00-00. 

No. 1615, Perry Gwynn, 
1-08-00. 

Sunday morning before the 
Interclub Race for which the 
Wollaston Club was host 
breakfast was served to a large 
gathering of junior and senior 
skippers at the Squantum Yacht 
Club. The menu included 
scrambled eggs, fried ham, home 
fried potatoes, toast, milk, fruit 
juice, and coffee. 



Data Drops Pair In Senior Babe Ruth Loop 



Data Services, Quincy's entry 
in the South Shore Senior Babe 
Ruth League, continued its late 
season slump by dropping two 
more decisions during the past 
week. 



Quincy was walloped by 
Weymouth Bankers, 15-8, 
despite home runs by Mark 
Jaehnig, Gerry Bugden and Dave 
Power. Quincy's defense fell 
apart and handed Weymouth 



Water Ski Schedule 



DATE 



Monday, July 29 
Tuesday, July 30 
Wednesday, July 31 
Thursday, Aug. 1 
Friday, Aug. 2 



TIDE 

8:31 a.m. 

9:29 a.m. 
10:19 a.m. 
11:03 a.m. 
1 1:44 a.m. 



TIME 

7:30-10:30 

7:30-11:30 

3:00-12:00 

9:00-2:00 

9:45-1:45 



BEACH 

Fenno 
Nick^rson 
Heron Road 
Baker 
Mound Street 



nine runs in the fourth inning. 

Quincy also was edged by 
Weymouth Eagles, 7-6, as 
Weymouth, winner of only one 
previous game in 11, scored 
three runs in the sixth inning. 

A misjudged fly to center 
field started the sixth inning 
troubles. 

Power had two triples and 
Jaehnig, Paul Messina and Brian 
Stack a double each for Quincy. 
John Papile pitched well in relief 
but suffered the loss. 



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Track Club Meet Tonight 



The Quincy Track Club, in its 
first year, continues to grow and 
grow with more than 250 boys, 
girls, men and women registered, 
and the weekly meets ai Quincy 
Veterans Stadium are providing 
more competition and better 
performances every week. 

Another in the series of 
weekly meets takes place tonight 
(Thursday j at 6 p.m. at the 
stadium. Practices, incidentally, 
are held each Monday, Tuesday 
and Wednesday. 

Last week's meet provided 
two triple winners in Carl Nord 
and Jane Righini and other 
outstanding performances by 
Dotty Irvine, Laurie Smith, Pat 
King and Jack Reynolds. 

The latest innovation was a 
mixed relay with two girls and 
two boys on each team. There 
was also another special relay 
pitting four girls against two 
210-pound shot-putters in which 
the boys, Harry Knudson and 
Bill Popsie, won. 

The winners; 

Shot-put - Boys 12-15, Paul 
Ahem; 16 and up, Paul Doherty. 

Discus - Boys 16 and up, Phil 
Robinson. 



100-yard dash - Boys 9-11, 
Cart Nord; boys 12-15, John 
Ladd; boys 16 and up, Lee 
Watkins; girls 9-1 1, Jane Righini; 
girls 1 2 and up, Janice Kelly. 

22-yard dash - Boys 9-1 1, Carl 
Nord; boys 12-15, John Ladd; 
boys 16 and up, Lee Watkins; 
girls 9-11, Jane Righini; girls 12 
and up, Laurie Smith. 

440-yard run - Boys 9-1 1, Pat 
King; boys 12-15, Jack Maheras; 
girls 1 2 and up, Dotty Irvine. 

880-yard run - Boys 9-11, Carl 
Nord; boys 12-15, Bob 
Levenson; boys 16 and up, Bart 
Petracca; girls 12 and up, 
Suzanne Yee. 

Mile-run - Boys 12-15, Marty 
Levenson; girls 12 and up. Dotty 
Irvine. 

Relays - Mixed, Laurie Smith, 
Geoff Hennessey, Debbi'^ Biagini 
and Paul Doherty; girls 9-11, 
Susan Gallery, Gail Clougherty, 
Jane Righini and Terry Zerega; 
boys 9-11, Dean Zoia, Mark 
McGill, Brian Bums and Steve 
Burns; boys 12-15, Marty 
Levenson, Jack Maheras, Paul 
Cody and John Ladd; girls 
12-15, Laurie Smith, Dotty 
Irvine, Janice Kelly and Debbie 
Biagini. 



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Page 24 Quincy Sun Thursday, July 25, 1974 

• Babe Ruth League 



Police, Bersani, Granite City Win 



The Police Club, National 
League champions in the Quincy 
Babe Ruth League, continued to 
roll merrily and last week added 
two more easy wins. 

Police romped over Hancock 
Bank, 13-2, with winning pitcher 
Lou Fishman striking out six. 
Fish man also had a triple and 
single. Chuck LoPresti had a 
double and single and Brian 
Connelly two hits and Tom 
Brennan, Richie Boyle and Mike 
McCormack a hit each. Ron 
Donovan played an outstanding 



game at shortstop. 

Police also walloped the Elks, 
10-3, with LoPresti striking out 
14 and having three hits himself 
including a home run. Mike 
Murphy had a double and two 
singles, Donovan a double and 
single, Fishman and Ed Laracy 
two hits each, John Derris and 
Connelly one apiece. 

Bersani Brothers defeated 
Morrisette Post, 6-3, with Mark 
Buchanan starring both at bat 
and on the mound. Matt Nee 



had two hits in a losing cause for 
Morrisette, 

Bersani also defeated Gino's, 
8-5, with Lenny Picot the 
winning pitcher. Dave Peters 
drove in three runs for the 
winners. The game was in doubt 
until the final two innings. 

Granite City Electric walloped 
VFW, 15-7, with Dave Cramond 
giving up five hits before being 
relieved by Steve Doyle. 
Cramond also had four singles 
and a walk. Carl Bergstrom and 
Bob Stack each had a triple. 



• Quincy Softball 

Sabina's Takes Over Top Spot, 
Sully's Racks Up 4 Wins 



Sabina's continued to roll in 
the Quincy Softball League and 
took over first place in the 
National League West with two 
more wins during the past week. 

Sabina's edged Pagies. 7-6, 
with Ted Stevenson coming in to 
pitch with two outs in the final 
inning and Pagies threatening, 
and got the last batter on a 
routine fly to right to get the 
save. 

Sabina's also toppled 
Hofbrau, 6-0, with two home 
runs each by Fred Azar and Paul 
Jay. "The entire infield was 
dynamite " winning- manager 
Mike Parros said after the game. 

Sully's had an up and down 
week as it won four games and 
lost two. It started with a 4-3 
win over Walsh's with Dave 
Tarbox scoring the winning run 
in the eighth inning, on Mike 
Connell's double. 

Sully's then dropped an 8-6 



decision to the Alumni Cafe 
with Alumni's John Casey 
hitting a three-run homer. 
George Berard had three hits for 
SuUy's. 

Sully's snapped a long hitting 
slump by belting Bill's Texaco, 
23-4, then lost to County Line, 
9-5. Paul Matta had three hits 
for the Line. 

Sully's bounced back on a last 
inning single by Jerry Pratt to 
nip Dee Dee's, 10-9. Paul Erler 
homered for Dee Dee's. 

Sully's finished the week with 
a 13-4 romp over Wells Grille, 
with H^rry Daniels and Charlie 
Viola having two hits each. 

Walsh's breezed over Mclnnis 
Corp., 12-3, for its fifth win of 
the year. Walsh's then dropped a 
13-11 slugfest to A & T Movers 
as A & T came up with an 
eight-run inning. 

Marcel Corp. defeated Wells, 
13-7, with home runs by Bill 



Jennings, Ron Arria and Mike 
Arria. Chuck Gosselin hit a 
mammoth homer to center field 
for Wells. 



AMERICAN LEAGUE 
EAST 



W L 

14 4 

12 6 

8 10 

7 10 

2 15 



A & T Mc/ers 
Hofbrau 
Beau's Place 
Bocce Club 
Mclnnis 



AMERICAN LEAGUE 



WEST 



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J^l^ Recreation 
Roundup 




By JOE MOSESSO 

In this, the fourth week of the 
Quincy Recreation Department's 
summer program, there 
continues to be an overwhelming 
amount of interest shown by the 
youth of Quincy towards all of 
the Recreation Department's 
various programs. 

Probably the hardest thing to 
learn in tennis is the backhand 
stroke. The only way to 
adequately develop this stroke is 
through hard work and practice. 
It is this philosophy that tennis 
specialists Kevin McGinley and 
Betty Vittner are trying to 
impress on the city's youth. 
Some of the most avid learners 
thus far have been Cindy Bureau 
and Bob Ciardi of Kincaide. 
O'Rourke's Lois Malvesti and 
Anne Bertrand, Joe Kerwin and 
Tommy Smith of Atlantic and 
Mike Sullivan and Danny 
Marsters of Merrymount. 

The Atlantic Aquarium ha; 
been the main attraction of tht 
nature program lately. Nature 
specialists Michael Parros anc 
Paula Weidman have taker 
busloads of children to visit this 
sea extravaganza. Some of the 
most enthusiastic spectators 
have been Scott Buchanan, Paula 
Rue and Paul Kenney of 
Bradford and Debbie, Kim, and 
Steven Aluisy of Kincaide. 

There is no doubt that it takes 
a lot of persuasion to get a group 
of boys to sing. Well, music 
specialist Karen Walsh has 
accomplished the impossible. 
She reports she has found a male 
chorus at Montclair playground. 
Some of the Mario Lanza's that 
make up the group are Chris 
Baker, Glen Collins, Rick 
Reardon and Willie Dudley. 

The enthusiasm of the girls 
continues to shine towards the 
music program too. Those 
showing particular interest are 
Laurie Duffett, Pat Hunter, 
Kathy McBride and Andy 
Griffin of Fore River and Paula 
Murphy, Sheila Connolly and 
Beverly Brown of Montclair. 

Archery specialist Tim Flynn 
reports his merry men around the 
city are improving every week in 
preparation for the archery 
tournament in the last week of 
the summer program. Some of 
the best marksmen so far have 
been Brian and Chris McGilvray 
of Squantum, Forbes Hill's Brian 
O'Hanely, Dave Spring and 
Susan Brennan and Kincaide's 
Jim Maze, Al Dubois and Paula 
Bowlen. 

The golf program got into full 
swing this past week with a full 
slate of action at Furnace Brook 
golf course. Golf specialist Don 
Smith sends special 
congratulations to 13 year old 
Nancy Smith of Beechwood 
Knoll, who shot an amazing 
"5 2" for nine holes. Other 
outstanding players were Steve 
Blazer and Kevin Donelin of 



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O'Rourke, Perkins' Kevin 
Garrity and Lou Rizzo and 
John, Paul and Mike Griffin of 
Myles Standish. 

The arts and crafts program 
continues to be the 
overwhelming iavorite of the 
city's youth. This past week the 
making of puppets was the main 
activity. Some of the most 
innovative were created by Matt 
Popowitz of Kincaide, 
Columbia's Mark DiBona and 
Tabatha Mcland and Shea Rink's 
Mark Reghinie, Joanne Kelley 
and Jimmy Daily. 

Miss Andrea Quinn has been 
running a superb ceramics 
program at the Quincy School. 
Thus far the program has drawn 
a great many enthusiastic 
participants. Last week the 
children put their imaginations 
to work and created an 
international array of placques 
such as irish clovers and 
American eagles. Some of the 
more artistic creations were 
done by Evelyn Chriel, Billy 
Doran, Donna Ellis, John 
Anderson, Pat Maloney and Lisa 
Valenti. 

Meanwhile, the children at 
Perkins took a nature walk to 
WoUaston Beach. Janice 
McAuUffe no doubt enjoyed the 
trip the most as she returned to 
the playground with a big bag 
full of rocks, sea shells, sea glass 
and other assorted things. At 
Stoney Brae a chess tournament 
was held with Bruce Brennan 
emerging victoxious. Bruce's 
only comment after the victory 
was, "Bring on Fisher". 

There were a lot of belly 
aches at WoUaston playground 
the other day after a watermelon 
eating contest. It was a close 
race with Joanne Ruane, Kevin 
Green and Jeannie Keone mouth 
and mouth all the way. Finally 
Jeannie Keone puUed out the 
win with one big gulp. 

The mighty Merrymount 
midgets continue to overpower 
all district opponents. Last week 
they were victorious twice, 
handhng Mass. Fields 13-4 and 
simply mauUng Heron Road 
36-10. In the first game Danny 
Marsters hurled a brilliant foui 
hitter. The offensive punch was 
supplied by Brian Reale, who 
lashed three hits and speedy 
John Phelen, who legged out 
two singles. In the second gamf 
the Merrymount bats went wild 
with a hitting display put on by 
Brian Reale, Mike Sullivan and 
Danny Marsters. No doubt 
Merrymount is a team to be 
reckoned with in the upcoming 
playoffs. 

In junior baseball in District 
1, Snug Harbor is the team to 
beat. The Harborites are 
undefeated thus far in district 
play with a 2-0 record. Mainly 
responsible for the teams' 
success is pitcher Gorden 
Spencer. In 10 innings of 
pitching Spencer has fanned 18 
men and has given up onlv two 
hits. That's some kind of 
pitching in any league. Gorden 
also contributes at the plate 
where he's batting a sweet .600. 
Snug Harbor is not a one man 
team, however. Spencer gets 
plenty of help from Steve Nater, 
Jim Austin and Jimmy and Bill 
Bert. 

The Beechwood Knoll senior 
girls Softball team won a big 
game last week defeating 
archrival Merrymount 13-7. 
Gerry Foy went the distance for 
Beechwood, always bearing 
down in the key situations to 
kill off possible Merrymount 
rallies. The hit parade was led by 
Ann Sullivan and Patti Miceli, 
who both banged out two hits. 
Shining in defeat were Trish 
Sullivan and Pat Vena. 



Mayor's 'Sidewalk Office' 
Receives 130 Suggestions 



Thursday, July 25, 1974 Quincy Sun Page 25 



During the three-day Sidewalk 
Bazaar, Mayor Walter J. 
Hannon's "Sidewalk Mayor's 
Office" received some 130 
suggestions from Quincy 
citizens. 

The booth was so successful, 
said Hannon, that he plans to 
tote his "Portable office" to 
other parts of the city during the 
coming months. "We want to 
encourage people to make more 
suggestions for the 
improvements of our city," he 
said. 

One idea submitted to the 
mayor's sidewalk office 
suggested the addition of park 
benches and trees to Hancock 
St. Some 24 other suggestions 
also dealt with downtown 
development of the city. 

Several people suggested free 
parking to encourage added 
shoppers in downtown Quincy. 
The Mayor repUed that although 



the idea was "appealing" the 
removal of parking meters would 
transform Quincy into "a 
gigantic parking lot for people 
using the MBTA." He added, 
"Parking meters actually make it 
possible for more shoppers to 
come to the city." 

The Mayor also received 11 
complaints on the combined 
pick-up of garbage and trash - 
complaints dealing largely with 
the question of sanitation. 

Other citizens mentioned a 
laxity in drivers' observance of 
traffic lights and signs. The 
Mayor said that he will ask the 
poHce department to monitor 
more closely the observance of 
these signs. 

Hannon noted that every 
suggestion will receive a personal 
reply from his office or from an 
appropriate city department 
head. 



Thomas McManus 
To Seek Re-election 



Norfolk County 
Commissioner Thomas K. 
McManus [D-Norwood] 
announces his candidacy for 
re-election. 

McManus, an attorney and 
former Norwood selectman, who 
has served as a commissioner the 
past seven years noted that 
Norfolk County has the lowest 
per capita tax of all counties in 
the state. 

A graduate of Boston College 
High School, Boston College and 
Suffolk Law School, he has also 
attended Michigan State and the 
University of Nebraska. 

McManus is a Trustee of 
Norfolk County Hospital and 
Norfolk County Agricultural 
High School. He is a director of 



the Norfolk Mental Health 
Association and past director of 
the Norwood Red Cross. He is 
also a member of the 
Massachusetts, Boston, Norfolk 
County and Norwood Bar 
Association. 

A veteran of Worid War H, he 
is a member of the American 
Legion and Disabled American 
Veterans. A former Norwood 
Selectman. 

He is married to the former 
Mary T. Lyons and is the father 
of three children. 

McManus said "It is my 
intention to continue 
administering the government of 
Norfolk County in a manner 
which reflects progress at the 
lowest possible cost to the 
taxpayer." 



Desmond Attends School Of Alcohol Studies 



John Desmond of Quincy was 
one of 16 faculty members at 
the recently held fifth annual 
New England School of Alcohol 
Studies at Assumption College, 
Worcester. 

Nearly 75 participants 
representing governmental 
agencies and businesses from 
throughout the six New England 
states successfully completed the 
five-day program. Others in 
attendance came from North 
Carolina, Iowa and New Jersey. 



AL'S DRIVE IN 
RESTAURANT 

308 Quincy Ave. • Rte. 53 
A & W Root Beer 

Fried Clams Fried Chicken 

Onion Rings French Fried 

Basket of Shrimp 

•Complete Dinners ^Sandwiches 
Food Take Out Service 

Open: 5 A.M. - 1 1 P.M. 



Blinstrub's 
Old Coloiiy 

House 






760 MORRISSEY BLVD. 
DORCHESTER 282-7700 









Sandler And Young Wow 'Em 
At South Shore Musie Circus 



By RICHARD MATTULINA 

Take one multilingual Belgian 
with a Continental flair and one 
semi-Uterate New Yorker with 
an infectuous ear-to-ear grin. 

Mix in a Uttle soft shoe, some 
snappy one-Uners, a few dozen 
stirring songs and a yodel or 
two. 

Squeeze that into an hour or 
so on stage and you've got an act 
pretty well guaranteed to pack 
'em in and leave 'em laughing. 

What you've got is Sandler 
and Young, wowing crowds 
nighdy at the South Shore Music 
Circus in Cohasset through July 
27. 

Tony Sandler and Ralph 
Young set records at the tent 
with a finely polished act 
designed for fast-paced, non-stop 
entertainment with a capital E. 

The smiling starts with your 
first glimpse of Ralph Young's 
idiot grin and "aw-shucks" style 
and just doesn't stop. 



"Happy To Know You", they 
sing for their opener and you 
believe they really are. 

Much of the night Sandler 
plays the bemused straight man 
to Young's buffoon in light 
numbers including an 
en-Francais version of the rock 
and roll flop "Mr. Bassman". 

And the duo swing gracefully 
into ballads, such as the 
haunting "And I Love Her So" 
with close harmony and never a 
sour note. 

The program is strictly 
G-rated with lots of gospel, 
patriotic and inspirational music 
jammed into medleys, medleys, 
medleys. 

About the only things missing 
are the national anthem and 
"The Lord's Prayer". 

Young's booming baritone 
delivers "I Believe" as Sandler 
weaves in "Ave Maria". 

Sandler sings "Dominique" in 
French as Young spins off a 
string of spirituals underneath. 



There's "I Believe" and "If 
and "The Battle Hymn of the 
RepubUc" to stir your soul. 

There's an "Old Time 
Religion" medley, a Las Vegas 
medley and a "Johnny Comes 
Marching Home" medley. 

And there's a big band medley 
highlighted by "Moonlight 
Serenade" and conductor Leo D. 
Lion whistling "Heartache" a la 
Ted Wcems. 

Its all calculated to give you 
just enough. With eight bars of 
"Release Me" and 12 of "Mack 
the Knife". A touch of "Dixie" 
and a taste of "Let It Be". 

These guys are pros who earn 
every bit of thunderous applause 
they get. 

They are journeymen with 
polish and vitality. And, believe 
me, brother, when you leave a 
Sandler and Young show, you 
know you've gotten your 
money's worth. 

Now how many things can 
you say that about these days? 



Shirley Jones^ Jack Cassidy Signed 



Ron Rawson, producer at the 
South Shore Music Circus, has 
signed Shirley Jones and 
husband, Jack Cassidy, to fill the 
slot left blank by previously 
announced John Davidson, who 
has bowed out. 

The couple premiered in Las 
Vegas, and have put together the 



show which is now touring 
various summer theatre locations 
across the country. 

The two are backed by a 
chorus, orchestra and Ronnie 
Schell whose low-keyed laments 
about insecurity, the HoUywood 
crowd, sexy movies, and TV 
commercials not only provide 



food for thought but also many 
laughs. 

Shirley Jones and Jack 
Cassidy will be at the South 
Shore Music Circus Aug. 26-31. 
Show times are Mon. - Fri. at 
8:30; Sat. at 5:30 and 9; Wed at 
2:30. 



Williams Backs Pedestrian Light On Quincy Ave. 



Atty. Thomas Williams, 
candidate for state 
representative in the First 
Norfolk District, urges support 
for a bill to install pedestrian 
traffic lights on Quincy Ave. at 
the Presidential Plaza. 

Williams has sent a letter to 
the State Department of Public 
Works, Traffic Engineering 
Division urging its support and 
action. Quincy Ave. is under its 
jurisdiction. 



The bill was filed by Rep. 
Clifford Marshall. 

Williams said the lights were 
"much needed to reduce high 
traffic speeds which endanger 
pedestrians and have caused a 
number of accidents on that part 
of the road." 

He^ Stressed the need to 
protect pedestrians and to make 
the shopping center more 



accessible to local residents, 

especially those from the 

Martensen St. senior citizens 
complex. 



NEWSBOYS WANTED 
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money by building a Quincy \ 

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Telephone: 471-3100 



TONIGHT 
THE 4th 

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471-3844 



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BANKAMERICARD 
MASTER CHARGE 



Happy Hour Mon. 

Thro Thurs. - 4 To 7 

fREE HOR D'OEUVRES 

SUNDAY BRUNCH 1 1 A.M. 



•" 



Page 26 Quincy Sun Thursday, July 25, 1974 



DEATHS 



Ining C. Avers. 71, of 2855 
lulf-to-Bay Blvd., Clearwater, 
^la., formerly of Quincy, in 
Clearwater. July 1 7. 

Benjamin F. Kingham. 89, of 
Weymouth, formerly of Quincy, 
enroute to Concord Hospital, 
Concord, N.H., July 18. 

George Aghajanian, 77, of 35 
Campbell St., at the Quincy City 
Hospital. July 18. 

Miss Julia V. Cunningham, 83, 
of 30 Ellington Road, in Ellis 
Nursing Home, Norwood, July 
17. 

Freeman P. Clifford, 37, of 12 
Christine Road, Hull, formerly 
of Quincy, enroute to South 
Shore Hospital, Weymouth, July 
18. 

Charles P. Larson, 73, of 566 
Washington St., Weymouth, 
formerly of Quincy, 
unexpectedly at the Grand 
Canyon, Ariz., July 1 7. 

Arthur F. Harrington, 78, of 

94 Rock Island Road, at the 

Soldier's Home, Chelsea, July 

19. 
Mrs. Alma L. [Berardj 

LeFrancois, 97, of71Martensen 

St., at Quincy City Hospital, 

July 19. 

Arthur L Faulkner, 81, of 39 
Highland Ave., South Braintree, 
formerly of Quincy, at Brockton 
Veterans Administration 
Hospital, July 19. 

Mrs. Kathleen M. [ Clinton j 
Cormack, 73, of 18 Newton 
Ave., at Quincy City Hospital, 
July 19. 

Mrs. Marie G. [Lynch/ Giglio, 
68, of 178 Holbrook Rd, 
unexpectedly at Quincy City 
Hospital, July 19. 

Paul A. Kennedy Jr., 20, of 
59 Haviland St., accidentally, 
July 19. 

John R. Stuart, 62, of 24 
Branch St., at a local nursing 
home, July 1 7. 

Mrs. Hazel L. [Lewis] Riley, 
78, of 109 Standish Ave., at 
Quincy City Hospital, July 20. 

Graton Howland, 72, of 18 
Overlook Road, at Quincy City 
Hospital, July 21. 



MUSCULAR 
DYSTROPHY 



ROY'S 
FLOWERS 

94 WASHI9IGT0N H 

auma 

MAJOR CREDIT 
CARDS ACCEPTED^ 
BY PHONE 

472-1900, 



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s 



Mrs. Annie A. [FinnickJ 

Timmons, 84, of 59 Shed St., at 

Quincy City Hospital, July 14. 

John C. Ferguson, 46, of 41 

Graham St.. at home, July 14. 

Nicholas M. Wasson, 84, of 41 
Bro infield St., at University 
Hospital, Boston, July 12. 

Mrs. Irene A. [Helsten] 
Backman, 87, of 45 Woodcliff 
Rd, at a local nursing home, July 
14. 

Philip J. Gulino, 58, of 
Standish Ave., at home, July 14. 
Miss Patricia K. Nestor, 42, of 
47 Glover Ave., on arrival at 
Quincv Citv Hospital, July 14. 
Arthur f. Balkam, 91, of 230 
Harvard St., at his home, July 
15. 

Alexander J. Kelley, 87. of 18 
Grant St., Plymouth, formerly 
of Quincy, at Newfield House 
Nursing Home, Plymouth, July 
15. 

John J. Kowalik, 84, of 85 
Dickens St., at a Quincy nursing 
home, July 15. 

Mrs. Kathleen E. [Colliganf 
McManus, 70, of 43 Hingham 
St., Rockland, formerly of 
Quincy, at South Shore 
Hospital, Weymouth, July 14. 

C. George Blanchard, 84, of 
JO Lansdowne St., at the 
Robbin House Nursing Home, 
July 14. 

Mrs. Mary E. [Gorvinj Neary, 
85, of 116 Clay St., at Quincy 
City Hospital, July 14. 

Antonio Riccardi, 75, of 200 
Rhoda St., at his home, July 16. 
Charles E. Decker. 91. of 
Huntington Beach, Calif, 
formerly of Quincy, at a local 
hospital, July 13. 

Miss Priscilla Bertrand, 5 7, of 
59 Hamilton Ave., at the Lemuel 
Shattuck Hospital, Boston, Julv 
15. 

Mrs. Virginia / Willis/ 
MacLeod, 63, of 125 Knotty 
Pine Lane, Centerville, formerly 
of Quincy, at her home, July 15. 
John Johnson, 96, of 
Manchester, Conn., formerly of 
Quincy, in a Manchester, Conn., 
nursing home, July 20. 

Robert E. McKenna, 59, of 
Quincy, at Bon Secours 
Hospital, Methuen, July 19. 

Mrs. Margaret [Fay/ Miles, 
68, of 166 Harriet Ave., at 
Quincy City Hospital, July 20. 



MEMORIAL 
GIFTS 

EVERYTHING THAT IS 

WORTHWHILE ft 

APPRECIATED BY 

YOUR CHURCH 

A.E.GOODHUE 

COMPANY 
VESTMENT MANUFACTURERS 
500 IN STOCK 
1163 HANCOCK ST. 
QUINCY -472-3090 



A Record Breaking Year 

Quincy Tops District 
Nazarene Membership 



The New England Nazarene 
District broke previous records 
for membership, church school 
enrollment and finance of world 
and home missions in 1973-74, 
according to the first report of 
Rev. Donald Irwin of Quincy, 
district superintendent. 

Rev. Mr. Irwin, who was 
elected to a four-year term in 
the office at the recent annual 
assembly in Wollaston, reported 
that membership of the 
five-state district [all but 
Maine) topped the 5,000 mark 
for the first time; church school 
enrollment is over 12,000, and 
total giving reached $1,574 
million. 

Nazarene in the five states 
gave $66,633 for support of 
Eastern Nazarene College, 
Wollaston, where the sessions 
were held, and $33,452 for 
home missions work. Some 
$145,690 given for foreign 
missions represents 10.2 per cent 
of the total income. All three 
Quincy churches and the 
Duxbury congregation gave 10 
per cent of their income for 
missions. 

Rev. Mr. Irwin said his first 
priority for his new term is to 
strengthen local congregations, 
whose attendance falls below the 
national average Sunday 
morning attendance of 75 
people. 

He plans to inaugurate 
continuing education in church 
growth for lay persons and 



ministers, and seminars for 
pastors and people of the smaller 
churches. 

He quoted a church leader as 
suggesting "there are few 
problems in the local church 
that the addition of 25 new 
members could not help solve." 

The establishment of new 
congregations will be the second 
priority. 

The Wollaston congregation 
was on the top ten list in the 
district for church school 
enrollment and attendance, and 
was number one for the total 
amount raised for all purposes, 
$109,038, and for church 
membership, with 366. 

The city of Quincy has the 
largest Nazarene membership in 
the district with over 500 in 
congregations in Wollaston, 
Bethel Beach and Granite 
Church, South Quincy. New 
Bedford is next highest, with 
439 members in the multi-racial 
Portuguese Church, First Church 
and Faith Church, a Portuguese 
language congregation. 

Five of the other 
congregations in the top 10 in 
membership are in greater 
Boston, Maiden, Melrose, 
Cambridge, Brockton and 
Beverly. Others are Manchester, 
Conn., and Lowell, Mass. 

The District recorded $3 1 1 in 
annual per capita giving, with 
Duxbury listed at $522 per 
capita; Quincy Granite at $327; 
Walpole, $321; Bethel Beach, 
$320; and Wollaston, $297. 



'Truth^ Lesson-Sermon Topic 
At Christian Science Church 



The Lesson-Sermon Sunday at 
First Church of Christ, Scientist, 
20 Greenleaf St., is on the 
subject of "Truth". 

The Golden Text is from the 
Old Testament "Ascribe ye 
greatness unto our God. He is 



the Rock, His work is perfect: 
for all His ways are judgement: a 
God of truth and without 
iniquity, just and right is He." 
Deuteronomy 32: 3,4. 

Church service and Sunday 
School are at 10 a.m. during 
July and August. 



Dr. Maher Girgis Named 
To St. Margaret's Staff 



Dr. Maher Girgis of Copeland 
St., West Quincy has been 
appointed to the active staff in 
obstetrics and gynecology at St. 
Margaret's Hospital, Dorchester. 

He is a native of Cairo, Egypt 
and a graduate of Cairo 
University Medical School. He 
completed his internship at 
Cairo University Hospital in 
1964. 

Dr. Girgis has completed 



one-year residencies in general 
surgery at Quincy City Hospital 
and in anesthesia at New 
England Medical Center, Boston. 
He also served residencies in 
obstetrics and gynecology at St. 
Elizabeth's Hospital, Brighton 
and Tufts University. 

Dr. Girgis is a junior fellow in 
the American College of 
Gynecology and maintains a 
private office. 



$51,250 In Grants For 
2 Quincy Organizations 



Congressman James A. Burke 
[D-Milton] announces that the 
Office of Economic Opportunity 
is awarding grants to two Quincy 
organizations to support the 
continuation of administration 



and services currently provided. 
The South Shore Community 
Action Council, Inc., is receiving 
$27,750 and the Quincy 
Community Action 
Organization, Inc., $23,500. 



LgGAL NOTICES 

COMMONWEALTH OF 

MASSACHUSETTS 

Norfolk, ss. Probate Court 

No. 74P1741 

To ail persons interested in the 
estate of HELEN MARY EVANS late 
of Quincy in said County, deceased. 
And to the Attorney General of said 
Commonwealth, if required. 

A petition has been presented to 
said Court for probate of certain 
instrument purporting to be the last 
will of said deceased by EMILY 
MARY PFRIEMER of Quincy in the 
County of Norfolk praying that she 
be appointed executrix thereof 
without giving a surety on her bond. 

If you desire to object thereto you 
or your attorney should file a written 
appearance in said Court at Dedham 
before ten o'clock in the forenoon on 
Aug. 21, 1974, the return day of this 
citation. 

Witness. ROBERT M. FORD, 
Esquire, First Judge of said Court, 
this July 10,1974. 

PAUL C. GAY, 
Register. 
7/25 8/1-8/74 



COMMONWEALTH OF 

MASSACHUSETTS 

Norfolk, $s. Probate Court 

No. 74S0311 

To DAVID T. DECOSTA of 
Quincy, in the County of Norfolk. 

A petition has been presented to 
said Court by your wife MARILYN 
DECOSTA of Quincy, in the County 
of Norfolk, representing that she is 
actually living apart from you for 
justifiable cause; and praying that the 
Court will establish that she is so 
living apart from you for justifiable 
cause and by its order, prohibit you 
from imposing any restraint on her 
personal liberty, and make such order 
as it deems expedient concerning her 
support, and the care, custody and 
maintenance of your minor child. 

If you desire to object thereto you 
or your attorney should file a written 
appearance in said Court at Dedham 
before ten o'clock in the forenoon on 
Aug. 21, 1974, the return day of this 
citation. 

* When filing an appearance it is 
not necessary to personally appear in 
said Court on the return day of the 
citation. 

Witness, ROBERT M. FORD, 
Esquire, First Judge of said Court, 
this June 25, 1974. 

PAUL C. GAY, 
Register. 
7/25 8/1-8/74 



Gerard Fanning 
CG Graduate 

Coast Guard Seaman 
Apprentice Gerard C. Fanning, 
son of Mr. and Mrs. Joseph R. 
Fanning of 425 Sea St., Quincy 
has graduated from basic 
training at the Coast Guard 
Training Center, Cape May, N.J. 

During the 10 weeks of basic 
training, he received instruction 
in seamanship, damage control, 
close order drill, first aid, 
marksmanship, Coast Guard 
history and military regulations. 

He will now go on to a formal 
school for his job specialty, or to 
on-the-job training aboard a 
cutter or at a Coast Guard 
station. 



JBroik< 



we^e-ney jorozners 

HOME FOR FUNERALS 

RICHARD T. SWEENEY 
RICHARD T. SWEENEY, JR. 

1 INDEPENDENCE AVENUE • QUINCY, MASS. 

472-6344 









74ELMSTREET-^UiNCY 






326 COPELAND STREET 
W. QUINCY 



Dif«ctor 



M 



i . 



■■^-lii'^' 



,': ^':- 



Thursday, July 25, 1974 Quincy Sun Page 27 




LEGAL NOTICES 

COMMONfWIALTH OF 

MASSACHUSITTS 

Norfolk, ss. Probate Court 

No. 74P1407 

To all persons interested in the 
estate of Hl-LFN M. HAWLIY late 
of Quincy in said County, deceased. 
And to the Attorney General of said 
Conimonwcalth, if required. 

A petition has been presented to 
said Court for probate of a certain 
instrument purporting to be the last 
will of said deceased by W. PAUL 
HAWLF.Y of Lafayette in the State 
of Louisiana praying that he be 
appointed executor thereof without 
giving a surety on his bond. 

if you desire to object thereto you 
or your attorney should file a written 
appearance in said Court at Dedham 
before ten o'clock in the forenoon on 
July 31, 1974, the return day of this 
citation. 

Witness, ROBERT M. FORD, 
Fsquire, First Judge of said Court, 
this June 26, 1974. 

PAUL C. GAY, 
Register. 
7/11-18-25/74 



COMMONWEALTH OF 
MASSACHUSETTS 

Norfolk, ss. Probate Court 

No. 74P1765 

To all persons interested in the 
estate of EDWARD H. MacNFAL 
late of Ouincy in said County, 
deceased. And to the Attorney 
General of said Commonwealth, if 
required. 

A petition has been presented to 
said Court for probate of a certain 
instrument purporting to be the last 
will of said deceased by MARY R. 
MacNFAL of Quincy in the County 
of Norfolk praying that she be 
appointed executrix thereof without 
giving a surety on her bond. 

If you desire to object thereto you 
or your attorney should file a written 
appearance in said Court at Dedham 
before ten o'clock in the forenoon on 
Aug. 21. 1974, the return day of this 
citation. 

Witness, ROBERT M. lord, 
1 squire. First Judge of said Court, 
this July 10. 1974. 

PAUL C. GAY, 
Register. 
7/18-25 8/1/74. 



COMMONWIALTH 01 

MASSACHUSl TTS 

Norfolk, ss. Probate Court 

No. 74PI803 

To all persons interested in the 
estate of MARGARET MARY 
LYONS late of Quincy. in said 
County, deceased. And to the 
Attorney General of said 
Commonwealth, if required. 

A petition has been presented to 
said Court for probate of a certain 
instrument purporting to be the last 
will of said deceased by DOROTHY 
LOUISE LYONS of Quincy in the 
County of Norfolk praying that she 
be appointed executrix thereof 
without giving a surety on her bond. 

Jf you desire to object thereto you 
or your attorney should file a written 
appearance in said Court at Dedham 
before ten o'clock in the forenooh on 
September 11, 1974, the return day 
of this citation. 

Witness, ROBERT M. FORD, 
Esquire, First Judge of said Court, 
this July 16,1974. 

PAUL C. GAY, 
Register. 
7/25 8/1-8/74 



LOST PASSBOOK 

The following Pass Book No. SS-131 
has been lost, destroyed or stolen and 
application for payment has been 
made in accordance with Section 20, 
Chapter 167, General Laws. The 
finder will please retuia to the 
Shipbuilders Coop. Bank, 1 Granite 
St., Ouincy," MA 02169. 
7/25 8/1/74 



irx; \L NOTICES 



COMMONWIALTHOI 

MASSACllUSITTS 

Norfolk, ss. Probate Court 

No. 74PI738 

To all persons interested in the 
estate of ANN CLAIRI RILEY also 
known as ANN C. RILEY late of 
Quincy in said County, deceased. 
And to the Attorney General of said 
Commonwealth, if required. 

A petition has been presented to 
said Court for probate of a certain 
instrument purporting to be the last 
will of said deceased by LEO M. 
RILEY of Quincy in the County of 
Norfolk praying that he be appointed 
executor thereof without giving a 
surety on his bond. 

If you desire to object thereto you 
or your attorney should file a written 
appearance in said Court at Dedham 
before ten o'clock in the forenoon on 
Aug. 21, 1974, the return day of this 
citation. 

Witness, ROBERT M. FORD, 
Esquire, First Judge of said Court, 
this July 10, 1974. 

PAUL C. GAY, 
Register. 
7/25 8/1-8/74 



COMMONWEALTH OF 
MASSACHUSETTS 

Norfolk, ss. Probate Court 

No. 74D0879 

To PHILLIP D. CUNNINGHAM of 
Parts Unknown. 

A libel has been presented to said 
Court by your wife TMILY \\ 
CUNNINGHAM praying that a 
divorce from the bond of matrimony 
between herself and you be decreed 
for the cause of cruel and abusive 
treatment, neglect to provide suitable 
maintenance. and praying for 
alimony and for custody of and 
allowance for minor children. 

If you desire to object thereto, 
you or your attorney should file a 
written appearance in said Court at 
Dedham within twcnt\-one days 
from Oct. 9. 1974. the return day of 
this citation. 

Witness, ROBI RT M. I ORD. 
I'squirc. lirst Judge of said Court. 
thisJulv 8. 1974. 

PAUL c. (;ay, 

Register. 

7/25 8/ 1-8 '74 



For HoMe 
Delivery 

^H^ ^ «*• •■ 

Call 
471'SIOO 



hUR SALE 



MATTRESSES 



MATTRESSES - Immediate 
Delivery. Can you use 
exceptionally good buys on king, 
queen, full or twin mattresses, 
beds, trundles, bunks at discount. 
Brand names. Sealy, Eclipse, 
Slumbcrland, IJiglander, etc. 
Bedding has been our only 
business for over 20 years. Open 
eves.. Siesta Sleep Shops, 221 
Parkingway, Quincy, Corner of 
School Street. 

T.F. 

FOR SALE 

Frigidaire Washer $75. 

NorgeGas Dryer $75. 

Whirlpool Trash Masher $75. 

or best offer 

Telephone 471-6504 

7/25 



PETS 

Free kitten, male, 7 weeks old. 
Half Siamese. Call evenings, 

328-4932. 

7/25 



FOR SALE 

Apartment sized refrigerator, 

1 rench Provincial living room set, 

2 9x12' rugs, RCA color console. 

843-2793. 

7/25 

FOR RENT 
SUMMHR RHNTAL 

Cape Cod. Harwich, new hoi-se, 
furnished, 2 bedrooms, Wi baths, 
available week's of 7/27. 8/24. 
Evenings 471-8827. 

7/25 



LEGAL NOTICES 



COMMONWIALTH 01 
MASSACHUSITTS 

Norfolk, ss. Probate Court 

No. 74P1758 

To all jH'rsons interested in the 
estate of DOROTHY 1. RAl late of 
Quincy m said County, deceased. 

A petition has been presented to 
said Court praying that RONALD W. 
RAl of Quincy in the County of 
Norfolk be appointed administrator 
of said estate without giving a surety 
on his bond. 

If you desire to object thereto you 
or your attorney should file a written 
appearance in said Court at Dedham 
before ten o'clock in the forenoon on 
Aug. 21, 1 974, the return day of this 
citation. 

Witness. ROBERT M. I ORD, 
Esquire, I'irst Judge of said Court, 
this July 10, 1974. 

PAUL C. GAY, 
Register. 
7/18-25 8/1/74 



SERVICES OFFERED 



SERVICESOFFERED 




ART FLOOR CO., Inc. 

ci^te the EMood "With .. . 

LINOLEUM 

& TILE 

KENTILE . AMTICO • ARMSTRONG 

CONGOLEUM 

SOLD and INSTALLED 

HARDWOOD FLOORS, LAID &. REFINISHED by our SPECIALISTS. 
Complete line of Ceramic Tile • Carpeting 

dial . . . 328-6970 

115 Sagamore St., NORTH QUINCY 



LICENSED 
ELECTRICIAN 

Douglas W. Mason Jr. No job too 
small. Free Estimates. '^~" 
328-5743 anytime. 



CaH 



7/25 



KEYS MADE 

Locksmith on Duty 

GRANITE CITY 

HARDWARE 

1617 Hancock St., Quincy 

479-5454 



T.F. 



GENERAL CONTRACTORS 
MORAN & SONS 

Roofs, Porches, Gutters and 
Painting. All work guaranteed. 
FHA approved. Bonded & 
Insured. Free estimates. 

265-1426 or 471-1725. 

7/25 

SUNSHINE PAINT CO. 

Docs your house need painting? 
Why pay the ridiculous prices of 
professionals when wo guarantee a 
profession job for less. We are 
experienced and insured painters 
and can beat any professional 
price. Call Jack 328-4546. 

7/25 

INSURAIMCF 

HOME OWNI-RS RATES ARE 
LOWER: If you have a basic 
Homeowner's policy lor $20,000 
and arc paying more than $62.00 
a year, call 282-4412 at once. 
Rulstein Insurance Agency. T.F. 



TREE WORK 

Compare our prices. Work 
guaranteed. Call 

335-7675 

331-3741 7/25 

CARPENTRY 

Licensed builder, 26 years 
experience. Repairs, remodeling & 
additions. No job too small. Free 
estimates. Charles J. Ross, 
479-3755. t.F. 

HALL FOR RENT 

North Quincy K. of C. Building, 5 
Hollis Ave. For information 
Mease call 

328-5552- 328-0087 



328-9822 



T.F. 



HALLS FOR HIRE 

Weddings - showers - meetings - 
banquets. Elks Home, 1220 
Hancock St.. Quincy, 



472-2223. 



T.F. 



HELP WANTED 



ACT NOW 

Join the oldest Toy & Gift Party 
Plan in the Country - our 27th 
Year! Commissions up to 30%. 
Free Sample Kit.. Call or write 
SANTA'S Parties, Avon, Conn. 
06001. Tel. 1 [203] 673-3455. 

ALSO BOOKING PARTIES 
7/25 



' Save Gas and Money ... 
shop locally. 



CHILD CARE 

Rent-A-Parent. Young married 
South Shore couples will care for 
your home and children while 
you enjoy your vacation. 
Interviews and References 
available. 

UNIVERSITY 
HOME SERVICES 
961-1616 RANDOLPH 
449-3590 NEEDHAM 
T.F. 

ARCIinrs LAWN 
MOWER SERVICE 

Guarantee Quality Work. Honest 
Prices. No job too small. Free 
Estimates. 92 South Central 
Avenue. Wollaston. 472-8675. 

HI 2^ 



CELLARS and YARDS 
CLEANED. LAWNS MOWED. 

Call anytime 471-1278 

8/8 



Index for 
Classified 



A Services 

B For Sale 

C Autos 

D Boats 

E For Rent 

F Help Wanted 

G Pets, Livestock 

H Lost and Found 

I Real Estate for Sale 

J Real Estate Wanted 

K .....Miscellaneous 

L Work Wanted 

M Antiques 

N Coins and Stantps 

O; .'...Rest Homes 

P Instruction 




MAIL TO: QUINCY SUN 1601 Hancock St., Quincy 02169 
WANT ADS PAYABLE IN ADVANCE...ca8h must accompany order 
Enclosed is , for the following ad to "'" times 



COPY:, 



Katet: 
Contnct rate: 



$2.50 for one week, up to 20 word, 54 each additional word. 
$2.25 per week, up to 20 words for three or more insertions of 

the same ad. 
10 Consecutive issues $2.00 per week 
No refund will be made at this contract rate in the event of 

cancellatiofl. 

Deadline: Friday 5 P.M. for the following weeks publication. 
Please*include your phone number In ad. 



Page 28 Quincy Sun Thursday, July 25, 1974 



J 



tiiH 'con.Y^A'Y co^TYT/^^' Classified Column 



The Best Values To Date on the South Shore 



\ 



QUINCY 



Near Golf Club 




Dutch Colonial located in residential area of 
Wollaston, near I'urnace Brook Golf Club. 3 
bedrooms, 17' modern kitchen featuring 
double oven, wall to wall on first floor. 
Paneled family room in basement, formal 
living room with fireplace, dining room. 
Chain link fence. Perfect for children. 
$35,900. CaU our Quincy Office 773-1800. 



QUINCY 



26 Ft. Living Room 




Distinctive Brick Ranch is located in fine 
residential area on landscaped, showplace 
grounds. 6 rooms include 26 ft. fircplaced 
living room, pictured windowed dining 
room plus sunroom. Many, many extras. 
Move-in condition. Offered for $48,900. 
Perfect for the busy executive who wants to 
be near his work. Call our Quincy Office 
773-1800. 



QUINCY 



2 Family Colonial 




Quiet road, fenced yard, the setting for this, 
2 family Colonial. Owner occupied first 
floor has 7 rooms, 4 bedrooms. Second 
floor apartment, 4 rooms, 2 bedrooms, rents 
for $225 per month. Spacious rooms, wall 
to wall carpets, full basement with laundry. 
An investment property for $53,200. Call 
our Quincy Office 773-1800. 



QUINCY 



House of E.xtras. 

New Split Level home with many added 
special features. Wall to wall carpeting 
thruout, indoor-outdoor in lower level. 
Telephone jacks in all rooms, tire alarm 
system, thermopane windows, fireplace. 
Kitchen with dishwasher, disposal. Total of 
7 rooms, 3 bedrooms, family room. Garage. 
Offered for $47,500. Call our Quincy Office 
773-1800. 



QUINC 



Price Reduced! 




Owners purchased new home and must sell 
this 2 story Frame home immediately. 
Convenient Wollaston location, near golf 
course and baseball field. 4 bedrooms, IVi 
baths, 24' living room, dining room, kitchen 
with eating area. Garage, beautiful yard, full 
basement, hardwood floors. Price reduced 
to $36,900. 



QUINCY 



Must Sell Immediately 




O'.vner moving out of state, wants quick sale 
and has priced accordingly. Two story home 
set back from street. 6 rooms. 3 bedrooms. 
Heated sunporch. Built-in china closet in 
dining room, kitchen with dishwasher. Bus 
stops at door. Offered for just $32,500. Call 
our Quincy Office 773-1800. 



QUINCY 



2 Family, Quincy Sq. 

Fxcellent rental property in convenient 
location near shopping and public 
transportation. 5 large room apartment 
downstairs rents for $180, spacious 7 room 
apartment upstairs rents for S250. Tenants 
pay for heat and utilities. Offered for 
$39,900. Call our Quincy Office 773-1800. 



QUINCY 



Near Wollaston Beach 




Well cared for Two Family in convenient 
area near beach and transportation. 6 and 5 
room units both with screened porches, 
individual basements. Hardwood floors, new 
siding, new wiring, new plumbing. Enclosed 
backyard. Offered for $45,000. Call our 
Quincy Office 773-1800. 



WEYMOUTH 



3 Bdrms, $35,200 




Sparkling 3 bedroom Ranch style is in an 
area the whole family will enjoy. Walk to 
playground for supervised activities, walk to 
school bus stop. Also near MDC swimming 
and skating facilities. Beautiful family room 
with barnboard siding, kitchen with dining 
area, even a darkroom for the shutter bug. 
Offered for $35,200. Call our Quincy Office 
773-1800. 



WEYMOUTH 



New Listing, Just $28,500 




Child safe home located on dead end street. 
7 lovely rooms with 4 good sized bedrooms. 
Pine cabinets in large kitchen with family 
eating area. Central location. A truly good 
buy at $28,500. For further details call our 
Quincy Office at 773-1800. 



WEYMOUTH 





Fruit Trees Galore 


^^v> 


M. ■'' 


^ 




■if—" - - : """" ,y 



Well maintamed 6 room Cape situated 
agiong beautiful fruit trees and grape arbors. 
3 queen size bedrooms, 18' kitchen has new 
cabinets. Wall to wall in living room and 
hostess dining room. New wiring and roof. 
Screen porch for summer enjoyment. Fully 
fenced in yard. Garage. Excellent value at 
$31,900. Call our Quincy Office 773-1800. 



QUINCY 



House and Barn $29,500 

Great value here! 6 room New England 
Farmhouse with many recent improvements 
including all new kitchen with self-cleaning 
oven, new bath. Also new wiring, new 
plumbing. 3 bedrooms, attic storage. Wall to 
wall over pine floors. Hardwood flooring in 
dining room. Washer and dryer to remain. 
Barn on property. Handy location near 
public transportation. Offered for $29,500. 
Call our Quincy Office 773-1800. 



WEYMOUTH 



Duplex < $28,800 




This Duplex offers great possibilities. Both 

have 5 rooms. 2 bedrooms, 2 baths, living 
room, kitchen and den. Bureau's are built-in 
each bedroom. Outside needs some work. 
Live in one, rent the other...or rent both. 
Great buy for an income property. $28,800. 
Call our Quincy Office 773-1800. 



WEYMOUTH 



Duplex Investment 
Water Views 




Older home with water views has 5 and 4 
room units. Basement laundry. One unit 
with deck. Fenced side yard ideal for 
children. Near Quincy bus stop. Perfect real 
estate investment or live in one unit, rent 
the other to lower your monthly payments. 
Excellent way to buy your first home. 
Offered for $39,900. Call our Quincy Office 
773-1800. 



BRAINTREE 



Spacious Rooms, $27,500 




Good home for small family, couple. 5 
room, Two Story Home boasts large rooms 
including 20 ft. living room and 20 ft. 
bedroom. China closet in dining room, 
dishwasher and disposal in kitchen. Wall to 
wall carpets. Front porch. Fenced grounds. 
Just $27,500. Call our Quincy Office 
773-1800. 



ABINGTON 



40 Ft. Living Rm. 

Gracious Victorian design, 9 huge rooms, 10 
ft. ceilings, slate roof. On full acre grounds 
across street from pond. 20 ft. kitchen, 15 
and 22 ft. bedrooms. Now used as a two 
family could be continued or used as large 
single family home. Offered for $39,900. 
Call our Quincy Office 773-1800. 



BRAINTREE 



Colonial With Apt. 




/^ INVFSTMENT \ 
BUILDING \ 

New brick professional office 
building. Near expressway. 
Take advantage of first user's 
depreciation. Financing 
arranged. $125,000 cash 
required. Call Dick Green in 
our Quincy Commercial 
^Division, 773-1800. / 



Handsome Garrison Colonial is located on 
quiet street. Manicured lawns and shrubs. 
Garden shed. In-law apartment consists of 
living room, kitchen, bedroom, sunporch, 
bath and private entrance. Main house 
boasts 3 bedrooms, fireplaced living room, 
kitchen with new cabinets, dishwasher. 
Sliding ^ass doors to patio. Spacious, 
impressive home for $53,900. Call our 
Quincy Office 773-1800. 



i 



box 37y 

Quincy, Mass. 02169 



^'.L l^> „ U. . ' 









Vol. 6 No. 46 
Thursday, August 1, 1974 



2uc4tcf'd Omt Ti^cciUf Ttc(^^i^ 






\ ^ i-, 'Y, 




Bay Race Wee 

Pages 11-18 





PRETTY ADVERTISEMENTS FOR Quincy Bay Race Week are Lena Puleo, 16, 
of Colby Rd., and Kathy MacKay, 17, of Dunbarton Rd, both of Wollaston, 
shown here in nautical setting at Wollaston Yacht Club. Both girls are 



cheerleaders at North Quincy High School. Uuincy Bay Race Week is now 
underway through Sunday. 

[Quincy Sun Photo by Laban Whittakerl 



Page 2 Quincy Sun Thursday, August 1 , 1974 






Published weekly on Thursday by 

The Quincy Sun Publishing Company 

1601 Hancock St., Quincy, Massachusetts 02169 

Publisher and Editor 

Henry W. Bosworth, Jr. 

Advertising Director 

John B. Powers 

10^ Per Copy - $4.00 Per Year - Out of State $5.00 Per Year 

Telephone: 471-3100 471-3101 471-3102 

Second-Class Postage Paid at Boston, Mass. 

MEMBER NEW ENGLAND PRESS ASSOCIATION 

The Quincy Sun aisuiriet no financial responsibility for 
typographical errors in advertisements but will reprint that part of 
an advertisement in which the typographical error occurs. 



Hearings On Zoning 



The Quincy Planning Board 
will hold two public hearings 
Wednesday, Aug. 7 at 7.''0 p.m. 
in the City CouncU Chamber, 
Qty Hall to discuss two 
proposed zoning changes. 

The first proposed change is 
from Planned Unit Development 
to Open Space on the 
city-owned land on the 
northeasterly side of Upland Rd. 

This land is bounded on the 
west by Upland Rd., on the 



north by Adams St., on the east 
by the MBTA right of way, and 
on the south by Dimmock St. 

The second proposed change, 
to be discussed at 7:45 p.m., 
deals with a zoning shift from 
Residence "B" to Residence 
"A" on the following described 
property: 

"That block of land shown on 
Assessor's Plan 507 2-A as 
Residence "B"; bounded by 
Wollaston Ave., Waterston Ave., 
Greene St., and Fenno St. 



WASH 



TRY OUR CUSTOM 
EXTERIOR CAR WASH 

Automatic 

White Wall 

Machine, 

Drying By Machine 

And Man Power 

We know we give 
the best custom exterior 
Car Wash available 

We Guarantee^ 

The Finest Wash Available 

Econo Car WasTi 

459 Southern Artery 

(opposite the Quincy Police Station' 



Resources Commissioner, Heritage 
Assistant Posts On Council Agenda 



The City Council was to meet 
in a special session Wednesday 
night to discuss the addition of 
$5,009 to the public service 
account, augmenting the salary 
of the new position of 
commissioner of natural 
resources. 

The newly-created post is 
being offered to Richard Koch, 
present Park and Recreation 
director, who earns a salary of 
$15,582. The additional funds 
would boost his salary to 
$20,591. 

Mayor Walter J. Hannon 
named Koch to the new post in 
order to consolidate 
administration of the park and 
recreation, forestry, 
conservation and cemetery 
departments. Before accepting 



the job, Koch is requesting a 
leave of absence from his present 
position, thus guarding against a 
possible change in city 
administration. 

The Council was also to 
confirm the appointment of 
Bruce W. McLain of 28 Vine 
Ave., Quincy Point, as assistant 
director of Quincy Heritage - the 
agency coordinating Quincy's 
celebration of its 350th 
anniversary and the country's 
200th. 

John R. Graham, director of 
Quincy Heritage, recommended 
the appointment of McLain to 
Hannon. McLain, who would 
receive $12,000 for the 
assistantship, was a former 
Patriot Ledger reporter and 
former public relations director 



for the Quincy School System. 
Hannon said of Graham's 
recommendation: 

"I heartily concur with the 
appointment. His past 
experience and performance 
indicate to me that he will do an 
outstanding job for the city of 
Quincy." 

The council was also to 
approve a lease signed by 
Hannon, giving Quincy Heritage 
the free use of office space in 
the Quincy Center MBTA 
station. 

Also slated for discussion was 
a resolve introduced by Rep. 
Clifford H. Marshall to install a 
pedestrian light at the comer of 
Lurton St. and Independence 
Ave., South Quincy. 



Quincy Hospital Needs Donors 
To Keep Blood Supply At Safe Level 

lincy City Hospital The Quincy City Employees' Donors may 



The Quincy City Hospital 
Blood Bank needs volunteer 
donors to keep its blood supply 
at a safe level. 

The blood is also needed for 
anticipated increased incidents 
of accidents during the summer 
vacation season. 

And by donating, you 
also help yourself. 



can 



The Quincy City Employees' 
Blood Bank was recently 
established through the 
cooperation of Mayor Walter 
Hannon and Hospital Director 
Harlan Paine. 

For each donation, a 
volunteer will be assured of two 
pints of blood for himself or his 
immediate family for one year. 



Donors may volunteer every 
eight weeks but not more than 
five times per year. 

Donor hours at the hospital 
are Monday through Friday 
from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m., Monday 
through Thursday evenings from 
7 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. and 
Saturdays from 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. 
by appointment. 



Summertime 




the banking is easy... 

at Braintree 

Savings 



Saturday Hours 

10 A.M. to 4 P.M. 

At Quintree Mall and 

South Shore Plaza Offices 




BRAINTREE SAVINGS BANK 



Thursday, August 1 , 1974 Quincy Sun Page 3 



Richard Buckley Named 
City Purchasing Agent 



Richard F. Buckley of 73 
Wesson Ave., West Quincy has . 
been appointed city purchasing 
agent, effective Aug. 12, 
announces Mayor Walter J. 
Hannon. 

Buckley will succeed Richard 
Newcomb who has accepted a 
position as assistant director at 
Quincy City Hospital. The 
purchasing job pays $13,100. 

Buckley, 55, brings to the city 
Purchasing Department 27 years 
of civilian service in various 
departments of the Navy. 
Hannon said: 

"We are indeed fortunate to 
retain someone with the 
background and experience 
necessary to continue the 
standard of excellent purchasing 
practices carried on in the City • 
of Quincy for a number of . 
years." 

Educated in Somerville and 
Boston public schools, Buckley 
graduated from Fisher Business 
School and holds a degree in 
Accounting and Business 
Management from Boston 
University, College of Business 




RICHARD F.BUCKLEY 

Administration. He spent three 
years in the U.S. Army Air 
Force as a pilot, first lieutenant. 

In 1968 he was named 
Federal Employee of the Year 
by the Federal Executive Board. 
He has been a member of the 
Board of Directors of the Navy 
Building Credit Union for 13 
years, servirrg as manager and 
treasurer of that union from 
1962 to 1969. 



COPE Committee To Meet 
To Endorse Candidate 



The Norfolk County Labor 
Council's COPE Committee will 
meet Sunday at 4 p.m. in 
Shipbuilders Hall, 480 Quincy 
Ave., Quincy to decide on 
candidates it will endorse in the 
coming elections. 

All candidates seeking labor's 
endorsement are invited to 
attend the meeting and be 
interviewed on their position on 
labor legislation. 



Prior to that meeting, the 
committee will meet at 2 p.m. in 
the same hall with Congressman 
James A. Burke. All incumbents 
and office seekers of the 
Democratic party are invited to 
attend. 

Congressman Gerry Studds 
and Joseph A. Sullivan, 
president of the Massachusetts 
State Labor Council, are 
expected to attend. 



Lydon^ Brownell Oppose High 
Rise Development On Granite St. 



City Councillor John J. 
Lydon Jr. and Rep. Thomas 
Brownell are opposing a plan for 
high rise development on 
Granite St. 

They contend that such 
development would abolish 
Scotch Pond Place, an area used 
for many years as a thruway to 
Quincy Sq. 

In a letter to Geoffrey 
Davidson, director of the 
Department of Planning and 
Community Development, 
Lydon expressed a main 
objection to the plan. He said: 

"Area residents have easement 
rights to Scotch Pond Place and 
these rights should be defined 
before the plan is approved." 



An easement right is right that 
one may have over another's 
land, such as a right of way. 

Lydon also called the 1971 
zoning change in the area - a 
change from Zone A Residential 
to Business C - "a mistake and 
an unfair encroachment into the 
neighborhood." He objected 
that the signing of the plan 
would give the City Council "no 
recourse for a three year 
period. ..to correct the zoning." 

Lydon noted, too, that he, 
Brownell, and other city officials 
are examining the possibility of 
co-sponsoring legislation which 
will "not circumvent the people 
in land development cases." 



YOUR LOCAL BOSTON DEALER AT 
THE NEPONSET QUINCY LINE 

DUGGANBROS. 
CHEVROLET 

PRICE!!! 

"80" In Stock 

6 cyl. Chevelles & Novas 
Choice of Models & Colors 
Buy for Price & Economy 

ALSO CHOICE OF 
3 CORVETTE COUPES 

Also good selection of Vegas 

DU6GAN BROTHERS 

Noith Quincy Garage Co. 
131 Htneoek St., North Quincy 

328-9400 

Weekdays 8:30-9 P.M. Saturday 6:30-5^ 



QHA To Get $115,552 
To Modernize Housing 



The Quincy Housing 
Authority will receive $115,552 
from the state's Department of 
Community Affairs [DCA] to 
modernize state-subsidized 
housing. 

Quincy's share of the total 
$3.8 million appropriation ranks 
seventh largest among 62 other 
Massachusetts communities. Of 
Quincy's total, $75,592 goes to 
elderly housing and the 
remaining $39,960 to family 
housing. 

According to DCA 
Commissioner Lewis S. W. 
Crampton, the $3.8 million is 



part of a $5 million 
appropriation approved by the 
Legislature and signed into law 
by Gov Francis Sargent. The 
money will help 'to improve 
livability' in existing 
state-subsidized housing, said 
Crampton. 

Funds are earmarked for 
improvements to heating 
systems, roofs, security locks, 
storm windows, and other items 
essential for an adequate living 
environment in subsidized 
housing. 

Requests for modernization 
funds were prepared by local 



housing authorities in 
cooperation with tenant 
organizations. Crampton 
commented, "We were pleased 
to have witnessed such close 
cooperation between local 
housing authorities and tenant 
groups." 

Funds for each community 
will be held by the state until 
local housing authorities have 
contracted with private firms for 
the necessary work. The local 
housing authorities and the 
tenant groups will then jointly 
decide how the funds will be 
spent. 



iVeii; Applications For Veterans^ Headstones^ Markers 



City Councillor John Lydon, 
chairman of the Veterans 
Services Committee, reports that 
a new application form is now 
available for headstones or 
memorial markers for deceased 
veterans. 

Formerly administered by the 
Department of the Army, the 
memorial program was 
transferred to the VA with the 
establishment of the National 
Cemetery System last fall. 

I'he older application form 
will continue to be accepted 
until supplies are exhausted. 



Persons using this old form are 
cautioned to forward it to the 
following VA address instead of 
that provided on the form: 

Director, National Cemetery 
System [42], Veterans 
Administration Central Office, 
810 Vermont Ave., N.W., 
Washuigton, D.C. 20420 

Applications can also be 
processed by the city's Veteran's 
Services Department. ' 

A headstone or grave marker 
is available for any deceased 
veteran who received an other 



than dishonorable discharge. The 
benefit is not available to 
members of the veteran's family 
buried in private cemeteries. 

Memorial markers may be 
obtained to commemorate any 
member of the armed forces 
who died in service and whose 
remains were not recovered and 
identified, or who was buried at 
sea. These memorials may be 
erected in private cemeteries in 
plots provided by the applicant 
or in memorial sections of 
national cemeteries. 



NOW IS THE TIME 



TO REPLACE THOSE ROTTED 
WOOD WINDOWS WITH 



Aluminum Replacement Windows 

'p°UTTYlN™°VER '^"'"'-^ GUARANTEED 




REMOVES FOR 
EASY CLEANING 




LOW HEATING BILLS 




AHHH... imi lUiilK YOU'RE A REAL 

PROBLEM-SOLVER. call now for free estimates 

Maintenance-free NUPRIIVIE Aluminum 
Windows are the ideal solution to all 
your window problems. In less time than 
it now takes to wash windows, NU- 
PRIME windows are installed for years 
of no-bother service. Our Full Guaran- 
tee is your assurance of quality. Inserts 
remove for convenient indoor cleaning. 




343 NEWPORT AVENUE - WOLLASTON 

479-1014 



Member South Shore 
Chamber of Commerce 



) 



Page 4 Quincy Sun Thursday, August 1 , 1974 




MARRiED -• Mrs. William J. Barron Jr. is the former Nancy 
Josephine Latini, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. John Latini of 27 
, Dartmouth St., Quincy. Her husband is the son of Deputy Fire Chief 
and Mrs. William J. Barron of 1 Mann St., Braintree. They were 
married in St. John's Church, , Quincy. The bride is a graduate of 
Quincy High School and Bridgewater State College with a B.S. in 
Elementary Education. Mr. Barron is a graduate of Archbishop 
Williams High School and Quincy Junior College. He is now in the 
U.S. Navy, stationed in Washington, D.C. He is also attending the 
University of Maryland. After a wedding trip to Bermuda they will 
live in Alexandria, Va. 

[Miller Studio] 

Residents In Visit 
To Washington 

Several Quincy residents 

recently touring Washington, 

D.C, visited the office of 

Congressman James A. Burke. 
> They were: 

[ Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Malvesti 
l«nd family, 29 Shirley St., West 
►Quincy; Mr. and Mrs. Aungus 



O'Hanley and family, 192 South 
Central Ave., Wollaston; Mr. 

Robert Gurwitch, 270 Quarry 
St., West Quincy; Mrs. Bonnie 
Brossman, 274 Washington St., 

Quincy; and Miss Anne Gavin, 
19 Russell St., North Quincy. 



DR. DAVID BARRON 

Wishes To Announce 

THE RMOCATION OF HIS DENTAL OFFICE 

/rom 7 Dorchester St., Squantum 

To: 

745 EAST SQUANTUM ST., SQUANTUM 

en July 29, 1^74 

328-9579 



HAIRSTYLE 

''^^ FOR A 
jQ FUN -FILLED 
^S SUMMER 







.1 




Come visit with our experienced personnel for the 
NEW Summer look - We're streaking to chinge your 
appearance and WOW don't forget our. . . 

AUGUST SPECIALS - MON. TUES. WED. ONLY 



PiRMANENT SPECIAL 
FROSTiNC • STREAKING 

mg:$2o. 



NOW! 
NOW! $12 



RUSSELL EDWARDS 

27 COTTAGE AVE.. QUINCY 472-1S00 472-SS44] 

Appointments or Wdk-in service - Open Thursday evenings 




At Quincy City Hospital 

July 19 

Mr. and Mrs. Stephen Kowlsk, 
66 Harriet Ave., a daughter. 

July 20 

Mr. and Mrs. Paul Kane, 58 
Rodman St., a daughter. 

July 21 

Mr. and Mrs. Gerald Padula, 
16 Federal Ave., a daughter. 

July 22 

Mr. and Mrs. Athanas 
Athanas, 170 Billings Road, a 
daughter. 

Mr. and Mrs. James Hirl, 73 
Stewart St., a son. 

Mr. and Mrs. Thakor T. Patel, 
46 Cleverly Court, a daughter. 

Mr. and Mrs. Chak-Lam To, 
205 Copeland St., a son. 

July 23 

Mr. and Mrs. Peter A. Campo, 
29 Prescott Terrace, a daughter. 

July 24 

Mr. and Mrs. Stephen M. 
Keith, 123 Water St., a son. 

Mr. and Mrs. Edward J. 
Bettuchi, 181 South St., a son. 

July 25* 

Mr. and Mrs. James Wehunt, 
7B Airport Road, a son. 

Mr. and Mrs. Wallace H. 
Johnston, 534 Washington St., a 
daughter. 

At St. Margaret's Hospital 
July 15 

Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Polvere, 
981 Hancock St., a son. 

Mr. and Mrs. Stephen 
Burkhamer, 148 Copeland St., a 
son. 

July 18 

Mr. and Mrs. John Kelly, 43 
Edgemere Road, a daughter. 

Mr. and Mrs. John Furey, 
236A Quincy Shore Drive, a son. 

Mr. and Mrs. Bernard Tarpey, 
74 Whiton Ave., a daughter. 

July 24 

Mr. and Mrs. Richard 
Gormley, 52 Gardiner St., a 
daughter. 

Mr. and Mrs. Paul O'Leary, 16 
Weeden Place, a daughter. 




MILESTONE - Mr. and Mrs. John F. Kearns of North Quincy cut 
40th wedding anniversary cake at surprise party. 

Mr., Mrs. John Kearns 
Mark 40th Anniversary 



Mr. and Mrs. John F. Kearns, 
Sr. of 18 Ocean St., North 
Quincy were guests of honor at a 
recent surprise party celebrating 
the couple's 40th wedding 
anniversary. 

Mr. and Mrs. John F. Kearns, 
Jr. and Mr. and Mrs. Francis X. 
Kearns were hosts at the party 
held at 180 Pilgrim Rd., 
Braintree, More than 65 relatives 
and friends were present 
including two members of the 
wedding party, Mrs. Patrick 
Sheehan of Charlestown and 
Mrs. Frederick Grimshaw of 



Braintree. 

Mrs. Kearns is a 27 year 
employee of Filene's of Boston. 
Mrs. Kearns retired from S. S. 
Pierce & Co. after 43 years of 
service and is now employed at 
the First National Bank of 
Boston. 

Mr. and Mrs. Kearns have two 
sons, John of Braintree and 
Francis of Quincy, and 10 
grandchildren. They have resided 
at their present address for 19 
years and are communicants at 
Sacred Heart Church, North 
Quincy, 



Sidewalk Bazaar Aids 
St. John's Juniors Scholarship 



A very successful booth 
selling frankfurts, cold drinks, 
coffee and donuts, was 
maintained by members of St. 
John's Junior League during the 
recent Quincy Sidewalk Bazaar. 

Despite some adverse weather, 
the charm and efficiency of the 
ladies manning the booth 
resulted in a very profitable 
donation to the club's 
scholarship fund. In the group of 
willing workers were: 

Mrs. Elaine Walsh, Chairman, 
Co-chairman Mrs. Millie 
Lomano, Mrs. Adeline Clodi, 
and Mrs. Joyce Bersani, and 
Committee Members Mrs. Doris 
Coletta, Mrs. Lucy Falco, Mrs. 



Marilyn McCarthy, Mrs. Judy 
Bersani, Mrs. Gerry Storella, 
Mrs. Fran Andronico, Mrs. Rose 
Forte, Mrs. Janet Ferrara, Mrs. 
Gerry JoUey, Mrs. Marie Abbott, 
Mrs. Chris Morrison, and Mrs. 
Hope DeNicoIa. 

On behalf of the organization, 
Mrs. Elaine Walsh, president, 
thanked for their kindness and 
cooperation Quincy businessmen 
Dan Donaher, Donaher Clothing; 
Ferdinand DeNicoIa, South 
Shore Television and Joseph 
McCarthy, Capitol Market and 
also James Bersani, Joseph 
Abbott, Frederick Walsh and 
Richard Cronin for their 
participation. 



2 From Quincy On Bowdoin Dean's List 



Two Quincy youths number 
among the 173 Massachusetts 
students named to the Dean's 
List at Bowdoin College in 



rariOM & KicharcL 

INSURANCE AGENCY 
INC 



on 



""Be Sure Now-Not Sorry Later" 



Brunswick, Me. 

Andrew Baron, son of Mr. and 
Mrs. Martin Baron of 180 
Squanto Rd, Merrymount, and 
Carl Leinonen, son of Mrs. 
William Leinonen of 8 South 
Junior Tenace, South Quincy 
and son of the late Mr. Leinonen, 
received honors or high honors 
in at least three-quarters of their 
second semester courses. 



1245 HANCOCK ST. 



Opposite Quincy 
Center MBTA 



PResidentS^1276 




SOUTH SRORI «"m«o«.APrtimi 

FACTORY SERVICE 



FOR 



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Call 479-1350 





For Home 
Delivery 

Call 
471-3100 



Thursday, August 1 , 1974 Quincy Sun Page 5 






i 










•^ 




MARRIED - Mrs. Kenneth E. Tolbert is the former Diane L. 
Cedrone, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Joseph L. Cedrone of 720 Willard 
St., West Quincy. Her husband is the son of Mr. William E. Tolbert 
of Tulsa, Okla. and Mrs. Sheila Tolbert of Kelso, Scotland. They 
were married in St. Mary's Church, West Quincy. Mrs. Tolbert is a 
graduate of Quincy High School and Boston State College where she 
majored in Elementary Education. Mr. Tolbert is a graduate of 
George Watson College in Edinboro, Scotland and is attending the 
University of Massachusetts at Columbia Point, where he is majoring 
in chemistry. After a wedding trip to Bermuda, the couple will reside 

in Quincy. 

[Pagar Studio] 

Granite City Grange 
Confers Degrees On 10 



Degrees were conferred on a 
class of 10 candidates recently at 
a special meet-ng of the Granite 
City Grange. 

Receiving degrees were: 
Eileen M. Fletcher, E. Nandor 
Carlson, Myrtle E. Carlson, all of 
Granite City Grange; Ruth 
Buckley and Olive Buckley, both 
of Fore River Grange; Joseph 
Syberts, Steve Rimmer and 
Nancy Rimmer. all of Brookville 
Grange. Marguerite Read of 
Pembroke Grange and Maude 
Therrien of Braintree Grange. 

Installing officers included 
Barbara Chamberlain, Master of 



the First Degree; and John 
Zampine, Master of the Second 
Degree; Elva Robbins, pianist; 
Elva Robbins, Master of the 3rd 
Degree; Chrystal Zampine, 
pianist; Waldo Chamberlain, 
Master of the Fourth Degree; 
and Elva Robbins, pianist. In 
charge of the Feat Table were 
Annie Dyer and Edith Thome. 
Pins were presented to the 
new candidates and brief 
remarks were made by John 
Zampine. Mr. and Mrs. Theodore 
Johnson assisted by members of 
Granite City Grange served 
supper. 



Senior Citizens To See 
Shirley Jones Aug. 28 



The Quincy Park and 
Recreation Board announces it's 
second Senior Citizen's trip to 
the South Shore Music Circus 
Aug. 28. 

The 2:30 Wednesday matinee 
performance will feature a 
variety show starring Shirley 
Jones and Jack Cassidy. 



Charles L. Alongi, assistant 
Director of Recreation 
announces reduced price tickets 



are on sale 
Recreation 



in the Quincy 
Office, 1120 




Hancock St. Transportation will 
be available at the regular 1 1 
locations throughout the city. 



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DERRINGER 

THE FLORIST 

Plaiiis Arrangements Flowers , 
- 389 HANCOCK ST. 773-0959 



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In and Out-of Warranty Watches Repa'^-ed 

Genuine TIMEX Energy Cells available 

-^O^e^f Jewelers 

1 402 HANCOCK STREET QUINCY I 
773-6 340 I 



Marriage 
Intentions 



Daniel W. Jurek, 1412 
Catherine St., Utica, N.Y.; Linda 
M. Martel, 206 South St., 
Quincy, bookkeeper. 

Lawrence J. Ham, 3 
Playground Road, Hinghani, 
U.S. Air Force; Elizabeth C. 
Zaremba, 25 Russell St., Quincy, 
at home. 

Laurence J. Corbeil Jr., 11 
Apex St., Quincy service 
representative; Judith A. 
Handschiegl, 53 Sixth Ave., 
Quincy, personnel assistant. 

John J. McLaughlin, 3 

Schlager Ave., QUincy, chef; 

Maureen T. Downing, 152 

Crescent St., Quincy, secretary. 

Wollaston 

Juniors Flea 

Market Sept. 8 

The Wollaston Women's Club 
Juniors is sponsoring a flea 
market from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. 
Sunday, Sept. 8 at the Stop and 
Shop Parking Lot, 459 Southern 
Artery, Quincy. 

Rain date is Sept. 15. 

Rental space is available for 
one six-foot space. 

To send -checks or for more 
information contact Mrs. Frank 
Doliver, 16 Pierce St., Quincy, 
by Aug. 22. 

Make all checks payable to 
the Wollaston Women's Club 
Juniors. 

Kenneth Crowley 
On Dean's List 

Kenneth J. Crowley of 
Quincy has been named to the 
dean's list at Franklm and 
Marshall College for the spring 
semester, 1974. 

Only students who attain a 
grade point average of 3.0 on a 
scale of 4.0, with no grade below 
a C-, are named to the selected 
list for high academic 
achievement. 

Crowley, a junior, is majoring 
in Government and English at 
F&M. He is the son of Mr. and 
Mrs. M. G. Crowley of 208 
Fenno St., Wollaston, and a 
1972 graduate of North Quincy 
High School. 

Marilyn D'Angelo 
Notary Public 

Marilyn F. D'Angelo of 418 
Sea St., Quincy has been 
appointed a Notary Public, 
announces State Secretary John 
F. X. Davoren. 

Confirmation of the new 
appointee was made at a meeting 
of the Executive Council 
following submission of the 
nomination by Governor 
Sargent. • 



PERIVIANENT 
REMOVAL 



UNWANTED 



m 



MARLENE 
MELAMED RE. 

Registered and Licensed 

Electrologist 

1151 Hancock St. 

Quincy 

By Appointment only • 

Call 773-1330 

FORNJKRIV 

KRKDFRICK S. fill I 




ENGAGED - Mr. and Mrs. John J. Rabel of 55 Copley St., 
Wollaston, announce the engagement of their daughter Linda 
Theresa to John R. Sharpe, son of Mrs. Lucille Sharpe of 1570 
Oakland Ave., Springfield, Ohio. Mr. Sharpe is also the son of the 
late Mr. Elmer Sharpe. Miss Rabel is a graduate of North Quincy 
High School and Emmanuel College. She also studied at the 
University of Navarra in Pamplona, Spain. She is now a teacher at 
Stoughton High School. Mr. Sharpe is a graduate of Springfield 
North High School and Harvard University. He is attending the 
University of Cinncinnati Medical School. An Aug. 17 wedding is 

planned. 

[Hookailo Studio] 

Marrymakers Plan 
Flea Market Sept. 7 



The Marrymakers of Quincy 
Point Congregational Church 
will sponsor a flea market on 
Saturday, Sept. 7 at the church 
on Washington St. 

Rental space is available and 
anyone wishing to reserve a 



space may call the church office 

luesday through Friday, from^ 
a.m. to 4 p.m. 

The flea market will run from 
10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Rain date is 
Sept. 14. 



Monty Montgomery On Lowell Dean's List 



Monty L. Montgomery of 39 
Woodward Ave., Quincy. has 
attained Dean's List academic 
standing at Lowell Technological 
Institute this past year. 



A 1966 graduate of New 
Bedford High, Monty is a senior 
at Lowell Tech in the College of 
Engineering. He also was on the 
Dean's List in the fall semester. 



Quincy Sons Of Italy 
Social Center 

120 Quarry St., Quincy 

Newest function \\ill now available for weddings, showers, dlnrter; 
dances. Two tastefully decorated halls: The Venetian Room has 
seating up to 150: Golden Lion Suite up to 300. A room for the 
bride at no extra cost. - 

FOR RESERVATION CALL 773 1295 ANY EVENING 
OR 773'2687 AFTER 2 P.M. 





^^sm^^ 



FASHION SHOP«>E 
1538 Hancock St., Quincy 

Dresses - Pantsuits 
Sportswear - Sizes 8 To 20 



Mon. thru Sat. 10 to 5 

Thurs. & Fri. til 9 773-4748 





Page 6 Quincy Sun Thursday, August 1 , 1974 

PERSONAL 

Old men need love too 

By PAT and MARQ.YN DAVIS 



Dear Pat and Marilyn: 

At 65 1 am past being a dirty 
old man, but I'm not dead yet. 
My wife passed away three 
years a»»o and lately I've been 
keeping company with a lady 
who has been a friend for 
years. Her husband died sev- 
eral years ago. Would she 
think that getting married at 
our age is out of the question? 
I own my own business, my 
home, and drive a new car. 
We could have several good 
years. Am I too far over the 
hiU? 

Grandpa 

Dear Grandpa : 

No! The lady will most 
probably consider you a great 
catdi. Dirty old men need 
love tool 

Dear Pat and Marilyn: 

My sister is 9 years old. My 
boyfriend does not want to 
come over anymore because 
my little sister spends the 
evening with us. giggling the 
entire time. My efforts to get 
rid of her haven't helped a bit. 
She continues to pester us. I 
have spoken with my parents, 
and they think she is cute. My 
mom feels that my sister has 
the right to look at TV with us. 
Don't I have any rights'' My 
time should count too. 

Wants to be Alone 

Dear Alone: 

You should be allowed some 

time alone with your friend, 
but not the entire evening. 
Why not suggest to your par- 
ents that little sister be al- 
lowed to look at her favorite 
television for a certain time 
and then leave' Or, you and 
your boyfriend can sit in an- 



other room and little sister 
can watch TV all by herself. 

Dear Pat and Marilyn: 

How can I learn to control 
myieinper'' At times I feel as 
if 1 am really going to ex- 
plode. The man I married is 
wonderful. He works hard, is 
a good father and loving hus- 
band. However, I will get so 
exasperated over a minor in- 
cident that I lose control. 
Then I scream and once 1 
even threw a plate of spaghet- 
ti. 

Am 1 sick or do other bored 
housewives act like this? I 
have noticed that I blow a fuse 
if I am especially fed up with 
the kids and have not been out 
of the house for a long time. 
Sometimes I feel as if some- 
one has stuffed me in a bottle 
and I can't get out. 

Temper 

Dear Temper: 

like mjfiiy young women, 
you have seemingly found 
that housework and child care 
is lea\ing a gap. When any- 
one, man or woman, feels un- 
fulfilled and bored something 
is going to give. My advice is 
for you to find something that 
interests you. Perhaps you 
have always wanted to paint, 
play golf or tennis, or maybe 
write a novel. Take an after- 
noon a week, hire a sitter, and 
get out. It is cheaper than psy- 
chotherapy so don't delay. 
You will cane home a better 
wife and mother. This is a do- 
it-yourself job so DO it now. 

If you have a question, 
write: Pat and Marilyn Davis, 
Copley News Service, in care 
of this newspaper. 



Egg Stain Needn't 
Be Egg On Your Face 



Before oil paints were in- 
vented, portrait painters made 
their own colors out of pow- 
dered pigments and egg yolks. 
They used egg yolks because 
egg yolks get hard and stick to 
most surfaces tenaciously. 

If you've ever tried to get egg 
stains out of a tablecloth, you 
know how well eggs stick. But 
treated promptly, says Virginia 
White, laundry expert for The 



Miracle White Company, egg 
stains can be successfully re- 
moved. 

As soon as possible, immerse 
the stain in cold water for five 
minutes, rubbing the fabric be- 
tween your fingers to loosen 
the stain. Launder in hot water 
with Vi cup Super Cleaner and 
1/4 cup Miracle White Deter- 
gent. 



We arc interested in PURCHASING 
& APPRAISING precious jewels. 

FREE CONSULTATION FOR PRIVATE 
OWNERS, BANKERS & ATTORNEYS 

Robert S. Freeman Certified Gemologist 

HARTS Jewalers 

1422 MancOLk St, Quincy, Mass, 



'* 




Call 773-2170 



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WOLLASTON FLORIST 

Serving Entire South Shore 



• Plants 

• Terrariums 

• Table Arrangements 

• Hanging Baskets 



•Weddings 

• Banquets 

• Anniversarys 
•Birthdays 

• Fresh Flowers 



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ay 



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Wollaston Center 



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472-2996 




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ONCE OVER LIGHTLY 

It's a crime to grow weeds? 

D.> AKTKI DITTkV 



By ANN RUDY 
Copley News Service 

Joseph Sobocinski of WU- 
liamsport, Pa., is a man 
whose front yard is full of 
weeds. 

A lot of you may be shocked 
by this, but for those of you 
who aren't, let me tell you 
what a weed is. A weed, ac- 
cording to the court that fined 
Joseph 1475, is "any plant 
which grows where not 
wanted." 

How's that for heinous 
crimes? Look around you, 
folks, do you have a criminal 
on your biodi? 

When I read about what 
happened to poor Joseph, I 
ran out on my front lawn and 
began snatching up as much 
crabgrass as I could witti two 
hands. When I fiUed a big pa- 
per box full I hurried into the 
garage with it but, as Edgar 
Allen Poe pointed out in "The 
TeU Tale Heart," guilt is not 
easily stored. 

Finally, I wrapped it as a 
wedding gift and put it on a 
top shelf above the half -^nipty 
paint cans. But every time a 
patrol car passes my house, I 
imagine I hear that crabgrass 
scratching, scratching ever 

louder, to get out. 

After Joseph paid his fine, 
he must have got to thinking 
about it, or the weeds came up 
again — as weeds will do — so 
he took it to a higher court, 
but that court upheld the low- 
er court. I'm not sure on what 
grounds, but they must have 
been weed-free. 

Well, so it goes, Joseph. You 
will simply have to be ever 
vigilant from now on to stay 
ahead of nature and pluck the 
first sprout of anything you 

New fathers get 
paternity leaves 

llie U.S. I>epartm«it of La- 
bor has become the first fed- 
eral agency to grant paternity 
leaves to new fathers. 

Under a new collective bar- 
gaining agreement. Labor 
Department male employes 
are allowed up to 30 days' 
leave when their child is born. 
Time off can be charged to 
annual leave or taken without 
pay. — CNS 




*Just keep pull 

see "growing where not 
wanted." If you were worried 
about a hobby or what to do 
with your retirement time, 
this could be your sdution. 

So look at it that way and 
try to forget the trip to 
Acapulco you could have 
taken with the $475. Acapulco 
is full of lush, tropical growth 
anyway, and I'm not sure all 



ing weeds, Joe. * 

of it is growing where wanted. 
It might have reminded you of 
home and your court hassles. 
Just keep pulling weeds, Jo- 
seph, and remember to tip 
your hat to the lady on your 
corner who has plastic 
geraniums in her window 
boxes. Now there's a gal who 
knows how to stay out of trou- 
ble. 



Chains make her a different woman 



Police called to the home of 
Mr. and Mrs. Lyn Buckley in 
Leeds, England, found the 
wife with a chain wrapped 
around her neck and body and 

secured by a lock, in the form 
of a chastity belt. 

The husband handed over 



thv.' key to a padlock so she 
could be freed and told police, 
"I have to bring her in line ev- 
ery now and then. When she's 
been chained up she's a dif- 
ferent woman." At last re- 
ports, the couple is back to- 
gether after a short separa- 
tion. - CNS 

AFFLUENT U.S. 

The United States has 6 per 6 per cent of its people and 50 

cent of the world's land mass, per cent of the world's wealth. 

-CNS 



QUINCY YMCA 

EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION 

CENTER 



Boys and Girls 3 - 5 years 
Certified, experienced Teachers 



Register Now for September opening 
Tuition includes weekly swim lessonl 



8:30-1 1:45 A.M. Por further information contact: 
12:30- 3:45 P.M. 



Mornings: 

Afternoons: 12:30- 3:45 P.M. The Quincy YMCA 

79 Coddington St., Quincy 02169 
The Pre-Schooi with Something Extra 479-8500 

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for 

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111 Mayor McGrath Highway 

Quincy, Mass. 

Tel. 773-1200 



Your Horoscope Guide 



For The Week Of Aug. 4-10 
By GINA, Copley News Service 

F'or more complete forecast, read indications for your 
Ascendant sinn plus Birth sij(n. To find your Ascendant sign, 
count ahead I'roni llirth sign the number ol' signs indicated. 



'riiiK' of Hirlh: 

4 to 6 a.m. 

6 to 8am 

8 to iO am 

10 to 12 Noon 

Noon to 2 p.m. 

2 to 4 p m 

4 to 6 p m. 

6 to 8 p m. 

3 to 10 p.m. 

8 to 10 p m 

10 to Midnight 

Midnight to 2 a.m. 

2 to 4 am 



I'roliulilr A»>«-4-n<lHnl tn: 

Same as birth sign 

First sign (bllowing 

Second sign Tollowing 

Third sign loilowing 

Fourth sign tbllowing 

Filth sign following 

Sixth sign following 

Seventh sign following 

Eighth sign following 

Eighth sign following 

Ninth sign following 

Tenth sign following 

Eleventh sign following 



ARIES: (March 21 to April 

19 — Also Aries Ascendant) — 

Tensions ease at home and 
you can shift to low gear and 
still accomplish all you want 
to. Children and leisure-time 
activities are favored. Your 
charm and charisma are 
high. An honor may come to 
you. 

TAURUS: (April 20 to May 

20 — Also Taurus Ascendant) 

— You are influential in your 
sphere now and popular. 
Some inner conflict regarding 
responsibility at home and 
your professional ambitions is 
indicated. Relax and try to re- 
duce nervous energy and self- 
doubt. 

GEMINI: (May 21 to June 
20 — Also Gemini Ascendant) 

— Take a practical approach 
to finances and work projects 
that are long-range. Written 
communication is favored — 
put creative, informative 
thoughts in writing. Work co- 
operatively with family for 
domestic joy. 

CANCER: (June 21 to July 
22 — Also Cancer Ascendant) 

— Good news should highlight 
this week. Be practical and 
down to earth in job affairs. 



Resist wishful thinking and 
falling for 'pie in the sky" 
deals. Guard diet and eat only 
fresh, clean foods. Think big 
at)t)tit finances. 

LEO: (July 23 to August 22 

— Also Leo Ascendant) — 

Social activiti& are high- 
lighted. Good time to review 
all security factors — savings 
accounts, insurance, safety of 
valuables. If convenient, this 
is a good time for a vacation. 
Get advice from travel 
agents. 

VIRGO: (Aug. 23 to Sept. 22 

— Also Virgo Ascendant) — 

Problems in marriage may be 
caused by unwillingness to 
compromise Domestic dif- 
ficulties can reflect on your 
attitude at work. Be more out- 
going with associates and 
neighbors. Good time for 
home decorating. 

UBRA: (Sept. 23 to Oct. 22 

— Also Libra Ascendant) — 

Pressures at work begin to lift 
and you can divert some of 
your attention to more per- 
sonal concerns. Get plenty of 
rest, watch diet and guard 
your health. Take stories you 
hear now with a grain of salt. 

SCORPIO: (Oct. 23 to Nov. 



21 — Also Scorpio Ascendant) 

— Contact with people of im- 
portance can be rewarding 
now. Changes on the job re- 
quire that you be cooperative 
and fit m with the new setup. 
Curb your temper in dealings 
with mate or partner. 

SAGITTARIUS: (Nov. 22 to 
Dec. 21 — Also Sagittarius As- 
cendant) — Spirits soar and it 
is a happy time. New friend- 
ships can be very rewarding. 
Good time to shop for furni- 
ture and appliances. Home 
redecorating is favored. Not 
the time for financial risk- 
taking. 

CAPRICORN: (Dec. 22 to 
Jan. 19 — Also Capricorn As- 
cendant ) — More energy is in- 
dicated now and the possi- 
bility of travel. Conflict situa- 
tions with male and partners 
change now to more coopera- 
tive attitudes. Literary in- 
spiration IS high — finish 
creative projects begun 
earlier. 

AQU ARRIS: (Jan. 20 to 
Feb. 18 — Also Aquarius As- 
cendant) — A hard-working 
week when much can be ac- 
complished. "Do it yourself" 
now instead of delegating 
authority. Emotions are ener- 
gized and you may be some- 
what touchy. Delay important 
romantic decisions. 

PISCES: (Feb. 19 to March 
20 — Also Pisces Ascendant) 

— Review a romantic op- 
portunity previously turned 
down. Domestic happiness is 
highhghted. Writing efforts 
are favored and your crea- 
tivity and intuition are high. 
Apply yourself to work for 
positive benefit. 

Discover your talents and 
potentials and understand 
your relationships better from 
a personalized lioroscope and 
analysis. For information, 
write: Your Horoscope Guide, 
Copley News Service, in care 
of this newspaper. 



ini-skirts not the fashion in China 



Six girls and eight boys 
from Glasgow, Scotland, 
ranging in age from 15 to 20, 
are spending 14 days visiting 
Peking, Canton and the Great 
Wall as part of an internation- 
al youth exchange program. 



The youngsters were ad- 
vised that the Chinese were 
against the party carrying big 
cameras and had reserva- 
tions about mini-skirts. They 
were issued copies of "The 
Thoughts of Chairman Mao." 
-CNS 



LOWEST BIRTHRATE 

U.S. birthrates reached the 
lowest point in history in 1972, 
with an average number of 
children per couple at 2.03 and 
population growth rate of .7 
per cent per year. — CNS 



Thursday, August 1 , 1974 Quincy Sun Page 7 

POINT OF VIEW 

Now it's Sonny 
without Cher 



By DON FREEMAN 

Copley News Service 

HOLLYWOOD - Ironical- 
ly, It seems now, the first rec- 
ord cut by the team of Sonny 
and Cher was called "Baby, 
Don't Go." This goes back to 
1965, when Salvatore ( Soony i 
Bono and Cherilyn Sarkisian, 
who had met on a blind date 
and were subsequently mar- 
ried, borrowed $168 and set 
out to make their first record. 

In time. Sonny and Cher 
would become famous as a re- 
sult of their musical-comedy 
series on CBS, which began in 
the summer of 71 and became 
a regular feature the follow- 
ing December. They were, in 
a sense, a latter-day Ix)uis 
and Keely — Ix)uis Prima and 
Keely Smith — with their ver- 
sion of married-insult humor. 
And they were enormously 
successful. 

Before the end of this sea- 
son, their marriage was on 
the .shoals. Their separation 
was at first personal and then 
professional. The show was 
canceled by CBS. Whereupon, 
Sonny Bono found a warm re- 
ception at ABC and this fall 
will bring the Sonny Bono 
Comedy Revue. In other 
words, Sonny without Clier. 

Meanwhile, in the 1-adies 
Home Journal, Cher was 
quoted as saying that she de- 
cided to divorce her husband 
not because she didn't love 
him but because he was a 
"male chauvinist" who, in 
Choi s words, couldn't bring 
hiin.self ... to give me a mo- 
ment's freedom." 

According to Cher, Sonny 
contends that when a woman 
comes home, she must be 
first a woman, and the mo- 
ment she becomes a woman, 
she must do what a man says. 
Walk three steps behind." She 
added about Sonny: "He's 



cute, though, because he's 

such a stereotype I am sad 

that it's over but I could not be 
a person under that regime. 
Under El Prime, as he calls 
himself — the El Primo re- 
gime. 1 could be a great ex- 
tension of him but I could nev- 
er be me." 

Also from Cher: 'I wouldn't 
like to think that he couldn't 
make it alone, and I wouldn't 
like to think that I couldn't 
make it alone, because we're 
really two good people. I like 
l)oth of us." 

Now they are going their 
.separate ways and it is Sonny 
who has the television show. 
But it is obvious, as he talks, 
that he wishes it were differ- 
ent. And you reflect, on meet- 
ing him, that he may be on the 
small side but not as short as 
all the Sonny and Cher put- 
down jokes would have led 
you to believe. He stands 5 
feet 7; Cher is 5 feet 6 

"To sum it up, 1 could keep 
doing the show with Cher but 
she couldn't do the sfiow with 
me," Sonny is saying. "I had 
the feeling that our TV series 
was, in a way, like a hit 
Broadway show. If one star 
leaves, they don't shut down 
the show. CBS didn't feel this 
way, though. Fortunately, 
ABC went along with my 
ideas. And if the show fails 
without her — well, I've 
thought about that and if it 
happens I'll just reach into 
my bag of tricks and try to 
pull out another rabbit." 

Sonny points out that even 
after he and Cher announced 
their legal separation, the 
show's ratings didn't suffer. 
"Today America is used to 
such things," he surmises. "It 
was nothing that shocked peo- 
ple, the idea of divorce. Peo- 
ple can relate to divorce now- 
adays." 



Eyeglass Prescriptions Filled - Lenses Duplicated 
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Stay Alive! 



By Jack Silverstein 






HIGH-RISK 
OLD AND YOUNG DRIVERS 



Young drivers are involved in 
more major accidents than any 
other age group. Last year, 108 of 
every 100,000 drivers aged 16-24 
were implicated in fatal auto 
accidents. At the other end of the 
spectrum are the old-timers who 
hold the dubious distinction of 
being the second most dangerous 
group on the road. Last year, 84 
of every 100,000 drivers over the 
age of 75 were involved in fatal 
accidents. 

With the older drivers, it's a 
matter of slower reaction time, 
failing eyesight or super-caution, 
such as driving at a snail's pace on 
a high-speed highway which can 
create havoc on the highway. 

With the youngsters, it's most 
often a case of over-aggressive 
driving such as "drag racing", 
burning rubber on the go, weaving 



in an out of traffic or racing 
through yellow lights. Give both 
the aged and the young drivers 
plenty of room if they exhibit 
any of these tendencies. 



* * * 

This information has been 
brought to you as a public service 
by NABORHOOD PHARM.ACY, 
406 Hancock St., No. Quincy. 

OUR SERVICES INCLUDE: 

24 hour emergency service, 
Charge accounts, 
F^ily prescription records. 
Year end tax records, 
Delivery service. 
Insurance receipts, 
Hospital supplies for sak or rent, 
Open 7 days a week, 8 - 10. 
Phone: 773-6426 



Page 8 Quincy Sun Thursday, August 1 , 1974 




Can Or Freeze Garden Vegetables 



We are in the middle of one of 
the best growing seasons in 
years, reports the Massachusetts 
Department of Agriculture 
[MDAI, and nature's bounty 
wfll be plentiful 

The President's economic 
advisore blame the weather for 
inflation, but any day now home 
gardeners will suffer from 
inflation of another kind: what 
to do with all the vegetables that 
ripened overnight. 

But the realization that a 
dozen once-tiny tomato plants 
have given you a hundred 
tomatoes all at once, or that 
little packet of seeds has turned 
into a mountain of beans need 
cause neither panic nor gluttony. 

You can preserve most of 
what you grow and enjoy the 
bounty throughout the year, 
says the MDA - and that goes for 
what you buy when crops are 
good and prices are lower. 



Canning fresh fruits and 
vegetables is by no means a lost 
art, and freezing adds another 
dimension to what our 
grandmothers could do so well. 
Mason jars appear in good 
supply this year, and the advent 
of plastic pouches, readily 
scalable and easy to use, makes 
the task even easier. 

But you have to do it right to 
avoid spoilage, warns the MDA. 
Reliable, specific instructions as 
well as recipes are available from 
many sources. With food costs 
what they are, and the time and 
effort involved, you should 
know exactly what to do, and 
follow the rules to the letter. 
There are no short cuts. 

The following booklets are 
free upon tequest from The 
Office of Communications, U.S. 
Dept. of Agriculture, 
Washington, D.C. 20250; "Home 
Freezing of Fruits and 



Susan Connelly In Economic 
Education Experiment 



An Atherton Hough School 
teacher is one of 175 teachers 
throughout the country who will 
take part in an experimental 
fellowship program in economic 
education this summer. 

Miss Susan A. Connelly of 
153 Hinckley Rd., Milton, a 
fifth grade teacher at Atherton 
Hough, will attend a two-week 
summer institute in economics 
and career education at the 

University of New Hampshire 

from July 29 to Aug. 9. 

This is one of 34 educational 
workshops to be offered in 



various states this summer under 
the sponsorship of the 
Sears-Roebuck Foundation in 
cooperation with the Joint 
Council on Economic 
Education. 

The institute at UNH is 
designed for teachers of grades 
one through eight. It will cover 
economic concepts, teaching 
methods, classroom activities 
and instructional materials. 
There will also be field trips, 
guest speakers from local 
businesses and industries, and 
demonstration classes involving 
students from a local school. 






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Vegetables" [G-106]; "Home 
Freezing of Poultry" [G-701; 
"Freezing Meat and Fish in the 
Home" [G-93]; "Freezing 
Combination Main Dishes" 
lG-401. 

The August issue of Family 
Circle carries an excellent article, 
complete with instructions and 
many recipes, on preserving 
summer's bounty, as well as 
further information available 
from the makers of canning jars 
and plastic food pouches. You 
may not have to look any 
further. 

From Massachusetts farms 
this week, you'll find green and 
wax beans in good supply, as 
well as carrots and beets. Fresh 
sweet corn is being picked daily, 
and carried home as fast as it 
comes from the field. 
Blueberries, yellow and zucchini 
squash, vine-ripened tomatoes 
and the salad crops are also 
reasonably plentiful. 

Blueberry 
Patch Not 
Open To Public 

Although the Massachusetts 
Department of Agriculture lists 
Angelo Ricci's blueberry farm as 
a do-it-yourself patch, it will not 
be open to the public. 

One should telephone 
individual growers in advance to 
verify whether or not they are 
do-it-yourself patches. 

Home Garden 
Pest Control 

About this time of the season, 
the home gardener begins to be 
bothered by plant problems 
caused by insects or plant 
diseases. There are so many 
different problems and remedies 
that MDA is unable to publish a 
rundown. If you're not satisfied 
with the job your present 
remedies are doing, you're 
welcome to call MDA Division 
of Plant Pest Control at [617] 
.727-3031 and ask for advice. 



Eleanor Corey 
Ends Active Duty 

Navy Yeoman First Class 
Eleanor Corey of 29 Bower Rd., 
Quincy Point, completed two 
weeks of annual active duty for 
training with Intermediate 
Maintenance Support Unit 
23Z-1 at the Naval Air Station, 
North Island, Calif. 

Corey drills one weekend a 
month with the unit at the Naval 
Air Reserve Station, South 
Weymouth. 




MILESTONE - Mr. and Mrs. Charles Pollara of 14 North Payne St., 
Quincy, recently celebrated their 50th anniversary. Mr. Pollara, born 
in Sicily, and Mrs. Pollara, born in Italy, were married July 20, 1924. 
They have four children, Mrs. Anthony J. Belmonte of Quincy, Mrs. 
Joseph F. Walsh of Quincy, Salvatore Pollara of Braintree, Matthew 
P. Pollara of Braintree and 11 grandchildren. A dinner party was 
held in their honor at the Morrisette Post in Quincy. 

[Martin Studios] 

Margret Murphy 
Attends Media Institute 



Margaret Murphy, a special 
education teacher at Snug 
Harbor School, attended a 
10-day summer Media Institute 
at Boston College. 

She was one of 41 teachers 
and administrators preparing for 
the integration of special-needs 
children into the everyday 



classroom this fall. 

The program emphasized the 
use of media as a learning device, 
giving particular attention to the 
needs of children with learning 
disabilities, such as 
hyper-activity, dyslexia, and 
hearing, vision and mobility 
problems. 



Youngsters Perform In 
'Circus Ring^ At A.S. Library 



The exhibition hall in the 
Adams Shore Library was 
recently turned into a circus ring 
for two performances. 

One was held for the area 
children and repeated for 
parents and relatives of the 
performers. 

The program opened with 15 
story hour clowns and 15 junior 
clowns, plus three senior clowns 
marching to circus music and 
doing cartwheels, somersaults. 
The story hour clowns followed, 
with recitation of a poem titled: ■ 
Circus Day. 

The junior clowns performed 
in 16 various acts with costume 
changes. 

Senior clowns Bob Fanning, 
Dennis Hines and George Davies 
performed in-between acts. Bill 
Bloomer was the ringmaster. 

A book parade brought the 
program to a close. All the 
children carried the many 
different books the' library has 
with a costume to match. 



GOOD and FRUITY 

441 Quincy Ave. 
Braintree, Opp. Quintree Mall 
THURS., FRI., 8 TO 8 DAILY 8 TO 6 



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BOILED e - c« . „ 
HAM $1.59 LB. 

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FRESH 
STEAMERS 
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$1.00 



LETTUCE 
3 HEADS 
FRESH ITALIAN 
SUB. SANDWICHES 
TOMATOES 

3 Lbs. $1.00 

ASSORTED COOKIES 
3PKGS. $1.00 






^4 



Make-up artists were high 
school students, Nancy Gott and 
Carolyn Doane. 

The program was under the 
direction of Blanche Eckert, 
childrens' librarian, assisted by 
staff members Ann Aronson and 
Anne Keating. 

Children who performed 
were: Story hour clowns Kevin 
Dempsey, Maureen Donovan, 
Amy Donahue, MaryFrances 
Kelly, Laurie Kohut, Jay 
LesPasio, Michael McCarthy, 
Eileen McCloskey, Christine 
Menz, Kerri Magee, Matthew 
O'Brien, Guy Page, Deanna 
Roache, Linda Flaherty and 
Patricia Thornton. 

Junior clowns: Deborah, 
Kathy and Lisa MuUaney, Terri 
and Paul Roache, Marty Griffin, 
Michael McGunagle, Bobby 
Roach, Danny Stewart, 
AnnMarie McCarthy, Briggette 
Hunt, Sandra Walsh, Lynn 
Manton, Roberta Hennessey, 
Andrea Salaris and Tina Curiey. 



WORLDWIDE 
TRAVEL AGENCY 

Presents 



BERMUDA 

Fridoy to 
Thursday ... 7 Days, 6 nights | 

plus 1D%tn per person 
duilile occupincy. 

Includes: Round toip air fwe ^' 
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GROTTO BAY Hotel en tho 
beach. Round trip trantfert 
between the aiq>ert and ho- 
tel. Breakfast and dinner 
daily. U.S. Departure tax. De- 
parts every Friday 



CALL 472-2900 



Thursday, August 1 , 1 974 Quincy Sun Page 9 



Kenneth Fallon Receives 
Special Recognition From UCT 



QHS Class Of 1944 Plans Reunion Oct. 19 



Kenneth P. Fallon Jr., of 
Quincy, past supreme counselor 
(international president] of the 
Order of United Commercial 
Travelers of America [UCTj, 
received special recognition at 
the recent UCT convention in 
Ontario. 

Fallon was awarded a citation 
"in recognition of his 
outstanding leadership and 
faithful, meritorious and 
distinguished service." 

Although born in 
Philadelphia, Fallon has lived 
most of his life in Quincy, 
receiving his education in 
Quincy schools and at 
Northeastern University. 

At the age of 18, he became a 
member of Wollaston Council 
594 of UCT. He was elected 
senior counselor in 1947 and 
became a past counselor two 
years later. Elected grand 
sentinel in 1949, he became a 
past grand counselor in 1955. 

Fallon was elected supreme 
counselor in 1970, serving 
through 1971. He then served 
one year as chairman of UCT's 
international board of governors. 
Also attending the convention 
was Donald M. Deware, of 
Quincy, grand conductor of the 
grand councilor. 

The UCT is a fraternal benefit 
service society, founded in 
Columbus, Ohio in 1888. 

Fallon is vice-president and 
commercial manager of the 
South Shore Broadcasting Co., 
which operates Radio Station 
WJDA in Quincy. 

He is active in civic and 
community work, having served 
on the Park and Recreation 
Board for 20 years. He is a 
member of the Elks, Wollaston 
Business and Professional 
Association, Quincy Bay Race 
Week Association, a 
vice-president and director of 
the Shipbuilders Co-operative 

Leo McNamara 
Appointed Notary 

Atty. Leo S. McNamara, 117 
Sea Ave., Quincy, has been 
appointed a Notary Public, State 
Secretary John F. X. Davoren 
announces. 

Confirmation of the new 
appointee was made at a meeting 
of the Executive Council 
following submission of the 
nomination by Governor 
Sargent. The term will expire in 
seven years. 







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KENNETH P. rALLON, JR. 

Bank, and a past director of the 
Rotary Club. 

Fallon is married to the 
former S. Dorothy McNamara 
and they have three children, 
Kenneth P. FaUon III of 
Marshfield, Mrs. Richard C. 
Tibbetts Jr. of Duxbury and 
Gregory R. Fallon, a coUege 
student. , They also have four 
grandchildren. 



The Quincy High School Class 
of 1944 will hold its 30th 
anniversary reunion Oct. 19, at a 
dinner and dance at the South 
Shore Country Club, Hingham. 

Reunion committee members 
are Doris (Byram) Adams, Lee 
Chella, Katherine [DiSalvol 
Eramo, Norma (DiTulliol 
Gacicia, Paul Kinniburgh, 
Donald Nilsen and Constance 
[Marr] Nolan. 

Class members may send 
reservations to Mrs. Walter 
Nolan, Prospect Ave., Wollaston, 
02170, or any committee 
member. 

Miss Adelina Chella of 45 
School St., Quincy, 02169, is 
receiving information on missing 
members of the class. Among 
the missing members are: 

Marion [Andrew] Keough, 
Beverly [Baker] Maxwell, Joyce 
[ Baker] DeGust, Richard 
Barkley, Irene Bizzozero, Walter 
Boisclair, Lorraine Boyce, 
Virginia [Boyle] Bausman, 
Marie Brown, Norma Carella, 
Bernard Constantino, Millie 
[CordeiroJ Low, Arthur Craig, 



Mary [Desmond] Anthony, 
Mary DiBona, Edmond 
Doucette, Ida [DoucetteJ 
Salmonte, Virginia [Doyle] 
White, Barbara [Dwyer] 
Campbell. 

Robert Engel, Sidney 
Goldberg, Elizabeth (Griffin) 
Bongarzone, Barbara [Gumey] 
Oney, Margaret [Hanson] Rock, 
Stoddard Hayden, Jean Hopkins, 
Edith [House] Sheppard, 
Wallace Johnson, Barbara 
[Kane] Roberts, Harold Keene, 
Harold Knutti, Nathan 
Krasnigor, Theresa [Ladas] 
Norton, Stanley Lawrence, Alice 
[Leary] Driscoll, Betty 
[Lindsey] Christian, Sally anne 
[Lydon] Deer. 

Patricia [McCarthy] Waite, 
Theresa [McCluskey] Feeney, 
Norma [McNeilly] DeLeuw, 
Marilyn [MacDonald] Graham, 
Gertrude [MacDougall] 
Dunmire, Colin MacPherson, 
Esther [Murry] Spacks, Mary 
[Olson] McCourt, Robert 
Phinney, Lillian Quinn, Jane 
Buckley, Anthony Cincotta, 



Charles Clauss, Winslow 
Ericksson, Lillian Floren, Gloria 
[Gifford] Sacchetti, Salvatore 
Gioncardi, Ruthe [Goldman] 
Rossi, Norma [Goodwin] 
Johnson. 

James Gould, Susan 
[Manson] Rinella, John McKim, 
Robert Seeley, Carolyne 
[Seymore] Mason, Earl 
Sweeney, Mildred Whitehead, 
Marie Gilmartin, Honorable 
Robert Ford, John Taylor, John 
Reardon, Warren Riddle, Emil 
Rogers, Elizabeth [Rudolph] 
Weaver, Barbara [Sampson] 
Kleimola, Estelle Silver, Mildred 
[Slauger] Trask, Carol [Smith] 
Bowie, Theresa [Splaine] Gillis, 
William Stainforth, Ruth 
[Wade] Carraway, Mary White. 

Eugene Wood, Evelyn 
Woodford, Robert Wright, 
Barbara Youtman, Russell Aims, 
Joan [Andrews] Krasouitz, John 
Dome, Virginia (Deacon] 
Carter, George Connors, Jeanne 
(Viente] Lacquadra, Rita 
[Tierney] Stuart, Linda 
Marcolini, Joy Moffat, Helen 
Stranberg, Clifford Kelly. 



SOUTH SHORE 
NATIOHAL 

VS. 

THE SAVINGS 
BANKS 



A savings account at a savings bank will pay you about V4 % more than 
a savings aco )unt at South Shore National Bank. 

For most people, who average somewhere under $1000 in savings, 
that comes to around $3 a year. 

So we say, put your savings into South Shore National, in a 
Multistatement account. 

We'll give you free checking. 

And 1 0% refunds on the interest you pay on your loans. 

And you'll come out way ahead with us. (We're beating the savings 
banks at their own game.) 



THE MULTISTATEMEMT PACKAGE: 



FREE CHECKING, 10% REFCIMD OF THE PAID FINANCE CHARGES ON 
ANY INSTALMENT LOAN OF $1500 OR MORE WHICH IS PUT ON MULTI- 
STATEMENT WITHIN 90 DAYS FROM THE DATE OF THE LOAN. MAXIMUM 
INTEREST ALLOWABLE BY UKW ON ALL SAVINGS REQUIREMENTS: (I) 
MULTISTATEMENT CUSTOMER MUST HAVE CHECKING ACCOUNT AND AT 



LEAST ONE SAVINGS OR NOW. ACCOUNT WITH SOUTH SHORE NATKDNAL 
BANK: ( 2) MINIMUM TOTAL MONTHLY BALANCE SPREAD AMONG ALL AC- 
COUNTS: $200 ALSO AVAILABLE: CLUB ACCOUNTS. AUTOMATIC SAVINGS 
PLAN, AUTOMATIC LOAN PAYMENT PI>iN, CHECK CREDI T THE STATUS OF 
ALL ACCOUNTS IS REPORTED MONTHLY ON ONE SIMPLE STATEMENT 



1 400 HANCOCK STREET, QUINCY, MASSACHUSETTS 02 1 69 



MEMBER FDIC 



1 



Page 10 Quincy Sun Thursday, August 1 , 1974 



Sunbeams 



Ray Cattaneo To Get 
Park-Recreation Board Post? 

By HENRY BOSWORTH 

Richard Koch hasn't made up his mind yet whether to accept the 
new $20,591 Commissioner of Natural Resources post, for which he 
is being tapped by Mayor Waher Hannon. 

There are a few personal matters he wants to work out first but 
the feeling around City Hall is that he will then take the job. 

As commissioner he would head up the so-called "earth 
departments": park, recreation, cemetery, conservation, forestry. 
The heads of those departments would be accountable to him. 

And when he says "Yes" and takes the job, who will succeed him 
as executive secretary of the Park-Recreation Board'' 

Insiders arc betting that the job vvill go to his present right arm, 
Ray Cattaneo. 

MAKF.S YOU WONDFR Dept: Ward 1 Councilloi Leo Kelly 
recently spoke out in opposition to conditions at a drinking spot. 
The Licensing Board suspended the license for .^0-days. 

Word got around that there would be retaliation-not t>om the 
owner of the drinking spot-but from one. Jwo or more wlu) 
frequented the place. 

And crash! Bricks were tossed through his phice orbusiiicss. 

A sad commentarx when :i public olTici.il caiiiK)t spcik out on an 
issue without some childish weudo or weirdos acting up like the 
Dead Lnd Kids out of a l*'40 nK)vie. 

THAT MUST HAVL- been some political pow-wt)w Monday 
morning at a Quincy Center eating spot. Seen leaving a backroom 
(not necessarily in this order]: Senator Arthur Tobin, former 
Mayor-Senator James Mclntyre, Rep. Thomas Brownell, Councillor 
John Lydon, Councillor Warren Powers, Richard Koch, executive 
secretary Park-Recreation Board, Quincy Court Clerk Dennis Ryan 
and former Councillor Edward Graham. Well, they weren't playing 
Beano. 

COUNTY COMMISSIONER George McDonald seeking the 
Democratic nomination for sheriff, has been endorsed by Local 941 , 
Brotherhood of Firemen & Oilers. Because "you have always been a 
friend of labor and the working man." 

McDonald, incidentally, will be honored at a fund-raising cocktail 
party at Boraschi's, Rte 1, Dedham. Monday, Aug. 5, from 7 to 9 
p.m. 

* * .* 

BARON HUGO, playing at the Miss Quincy Bay Race Week 
Pageant, brought back a lot of fond memories for local big band fans 
who remember him, Glenn Miller, Harry James, etc. at the old 
Totem Pole. 

The Quincy YMCA's Norma Finnegan confessed to Baron: "I 
cried when the Totem Pole burned down." 

And Baron, himself recalled another fire and this story: 

He had an engagement coming up and needed an accordionist. He 
called a certain one on the telephone and the fellow said "No, I can't 
make it." Baron called him several more times. 

The fellow said "No, I'm going out that night with some friends. 
We've got something special on." 

But Baron refused to give up, called him again, and finally the guy 
sa*d "^11 r'*^ht ''!! '^o it 'u^t to "et ^'ou oft nv ^"^^^ " 

So they played the engagement. The following morning Baron's 
phone rang and the accordionist was on the end of the line in tears. 
"You saved my life," he cried. 

"What do you mean, I saved your life?" Baron asked bewildered. 

The accordionist then explained that the special night out he had 
planned until Baron talked him out of it was at the Cocoanut Grove. 
It was the night it burned down. 

*** 

IT WILL BE "Fred Bergfors, Sr. Day" at the Quincy Rotary Club 
Aug. 6. Bergfors has been a Rotarian for 50 years and-has a perfect 
attendance record! 

*¥* 

FAMILY AFFAIR: Carmine D'Olimpio, the trades union head 
and wife. Amy, just got in the habit when they started picking out 
names for their five children. Each one has the same initials: "D.D." 
They're: Darlene, 22, David, 21, Debbie, 18, Diane, 15 and Doug, 8. 
5o, as you can see, none of them was nicknamed "DD". 

NICE GESTURE DEFT: Vi Pace honored recently by City Hall 
colleagues at a retirement party after serving the city 43 years in the 
Mayor's and City Solicitor's office, received a specially decorated 
three-tier cake from Ernie Montillio. Vi later brought it to the 
children at the Paul Dever State School in Taunton. 

HAIR, HAIR! Latest members of the Quincy Beard Club: Joseph 
Shea, Mayor Hannon's executive secretary; Basil Caloia, School 
Department purchasing agent, and Daniel Driscoll, assistant planning 
director. 

SMILE DEPT: Atty. Richard Barry says he must be getting 
stronger. Just a few years ago a $10 bag of groceries seemed heavy. 



Heritage Slide 

Program 

Available 

After five months of 
preparation, a slide and sound 
show called "Quincy's Pride: 
Patriots, Presidents and 
Possibilities" is now ready for 
presentation to groups and 
organizations in the city of 
Quincy. 

Featuring the programs of 
Quincy Heritage for the 
Bicentennial of the nation's 
birth and the 350th anniversary 
of the founding of Mount 
WoUaston, some 140 slides 
depict what will be happening 
during the next two and one-half 
years. 

The script for the program 
was written by Executive 
Director John R. Graham. 
Narration for the program was 
done by Winslow Bettinson of 
WJDA. 

In announcing the program, 
(iraliam said, 

"We're delighted to have this 
15 minute show for the citizens 
of the city. We will be glad to 
present it for all types of groups, 
both large and small because it 
makes clear that the City of 
Quincy is well prepared for the 
coming years of celebration." 

In addition, to presentations 
to groups, the show will be 
available for "counter top" 
showings in banks, stores and 
local businesses. Utilizing special 
equipment the program can be 
viewed automatically on a 
television type screen. 

The program may be booked 
through the Quincy Heritage 
office in City Hall. 

LINC Summer 

Workshop To 

Begin Aug, 5 

Project LlNC's Summer 
Workshop for 27 teachers and 
administrators of the Quincy 
Public Schools will emphasize 
the use of community projects 
as learning resources. 

It will start Aug. 5 in the 
Quincy Method Center of 
Quincy High School and is 
planned to train teachers in the 
use of community activities as a 
learning resource. These will 
include the Quincy District 
Court and local banking 
institutions. 

Teachers will carry back to 
the Learnin" Center ways in 
which the community facets 
could be best used by students. 
Teachers will be asked to outline 
tests which will be given to 
students before and after going 
to these centers. 

William Sullivan, teacher 
training director of Quincy High 
School will be assisted by Dr. 
Anton Lahnston of Boston 
University and Mrs. Maureen 
Gates, Projects Evaluation 
consultant. 

Boardwalk 

To Be Checked 

For Repairs 

Public Works Commissioner 
James J. Ricciuti, said a foreman 
will "inspect, make an appraisal 
and effect proper repairs" of the 
boardwalk from Sea St. to the 
dike. 

His announcement came in 
response to a letter written by 
Ward 1 Councillor Leo J. Kelly 
who had received several citizen 
complaints about "the 
deplorable condition" of the 
boardwalk. Kelly said: 

"This boardwalk is used as an 
access to Rock Island Cove and 
in its present condition is 
potentially dangerous to the 
public." 



Living, T.oday 

By Dr. Whliam F. Knox 
Personal Counselor 



'Please Love Me' 



Maggie was a beautiful young 
wife. She was desperately trying 
to save her marriage. She was 
telUng me her philosophy of 
nidiriagc and her attitude toward 
men. "I want to be an adult 
woman to an adult man" ... she 
said. "I don't feel that I want to 
be taken care of ... nor do I want 
my husband to feel responsible 
for me. I want to be able totalk 
with him .... say what I feel ... 
expect him to say what he feels. 
I want us to plan together .... 
work together ... party together 
... make love together. I don't 
think I'm asking too much. I 
keep myself trim and healthy 
and sexy." 

Maggie went on to say that 
when she was a little girl her 
mother taught her to put on 
perfume each evening after her 
bath before going to bed. One 
night she said ... "but mommy, 
why? There's no one in bed with 
me." Iler mother's answer ... "I 
know, dear, but some day there 
will be." That mother was 
preparing Maggie to be an adult 
woman ... an adult wife. 

Yet ... with all her early lite 
preparation ... with all that she 
was doing now to show 
consideration to her man ... 
always ready for fun times ... to 
entertam ... to talk ... able to 
make rational adjustments in the 
relationship ... she didn't feel 
loved. When she told Sigmund 
her husband that she felt 
unloved, his response was ... 
"I'm still here ... still married to 
you." Maggie was perplexed ... 
should she terminate the 
marriage? There were three 
children and 14 years of 
emotional investment ... each 
year she had lived on hopes that 
it would get better. It didn't. Sig 
had come on strong as a lover 
boy in the courtship ... fast car 



... money from his part time job 
... lots of parties. Within five 
years after the marriage all Sig 
wanted to do was to stay at 
home ... look at television ... 
drink beer ... prejudiced ... 
bullheaded ... rigid. He had a big 
belly now ... (he averaged a 
dozen cans of beer per night) ... 
lay there on the divan in his 
underwear. He was the very 
image of his own father. It was 
to this man that Maggie was 
pleading ... "Please love me." 

Sig didn't know how. His 
whole life was at a standstill at 
age 41 ... passed over by his 
company for promotions ... sour 
in disposition ... indolent. Sig 
didn't know what he wanted in 
life ... didn't know how to love 
himself or anyone else. Maggie 
did. The marriage was not saved. 
But it had a happy ending for 
Maggie ... because she was very 
eligible ... knew how to relate to 
a strong man ... met him and 
remarried within two years. 

Nothing will kill marriage 
love any quicker than bull 
headcdness and dullness ... and 
persons who do not love 
themselves ... who depreciate 
themselves ... and each other. 
One or both is not growing as a 
person ... one or both has a poor 
image of himself/herself. 

You can't love me if you 
don't love yourself. It's the 
biggest problem in marriage ... so 
all the other problems rear their 

ugly heads. 

* * « • 

FOR YOUR COMMENTS: 

For private counseling, 
telephone counseling, group 
counseling, contact Dr. Knox at 
659-7595 or 326-5990. For his 
book "People Are For Loving" 
send $3.00 to Dr. Knox, 320 
Washington Street, Norwell, 
Mass. 02060. 



Letter Box 

Contestant Has Thoughts 
On QBRW Pageant 



Editor, Quincy Sun: 

This is to request that you 
print the following: 

As a participant in the Beauty 
Pageant on Friday night 1 feel 
behooved to express some 
thoughts. 

I thoroughly enjoyed the 
opportunity to participate in the 
contest and I believe the Beauty 
Pageant, in itself, was well 
organized and handled 
smoothly. 

As one of the finalists I was 
asked the question "What do 
you think could be done to 
improve Miss Quincy Bay Race 
Week Beauty Pageant?" - or 
words to that effect. I would 
like to add to that question the 
words "for the SAFETY and 
COMFORT of the thousands of 
viewers." 

The following expresses my 
sentiment. 

Seating is provided for a 
relative handful of people while 
thousands stand pressing against 
the crowds and stretching to 
gain a quick glance of relative or 



friend on the platform. 
Hundreds of young people climb 
on top of buildings to see what 
is going on [some had even 
climbed on the billboard on top 
of buildings] . I had a frightening 
thought as I watched all those 
teenagers sitting precipitiously 
"over the edge" 50 feet in the 
air and wondered about the 
result of a slight overbalance or a 
gentle push from the crowd - in 
one word "BIZARRE". 

My sister was one of those on 
top of a building - very poor 
judgement on her part for which 
she paid dearly. In the darkness 
she tripped and fell against 
concrete and broke all her front 
teeth - in one word SAD. 

My sister suffered a great loss 
but before someone suffers a 
greater one, either cancel the 
event or change its location to 
provide SAFETY and 
COMFORT for all those 
wonderful people who show up 
to support the occasion. 

Debra King 

100 Geraldine Lane, Braintree 



Of Rice And Men 



Editor, Quincy Sun: 

According to the Quincy Sun, 
the Japs are scared of rice! If the 
Japs had a sacred gun, would 
The Sun think that was nice? 

[See page 10, issue July 23, 



1974 J 

Charles L. Murphy 
122 Everett St., WoUaston 

/Editor's Note: You might say 
we at the Rising Sun sort of 
scarred that one.] 



.\ -P 



^-o-J 






,^^1 



h!!? It °"*!f ''^'■^ve'l that stones from an eagle's nest could 
help them detect thieves. 



Thursday, August 1 , 1974 Quincy Sun Page 1 1 





Sports Section 



William Munroe 
Heads Bay 

Race Week Assn. 




BRAINTREE 



METROPOLITAN 



QUINCY 




SQUANTUM 




TOWN RIVER 




WESSAGUSETT 




Race Week Officers, 
Committee Chairmen 





This year's president of the 
Quincy Bay Race Week 
Association is Past Commodore 
William Munroe of the Town 
River Yacht Club. 

Quincy Bay Race Week has 
been held annually since 1938 
and the following men have 
served as Association President. 

1938-39, Edward Shaw, 
President - William Munroe Wollaston. 

Vice President - Kenneth Lavers 1940, Frank Henry, Quincy. 

Secretary - hdward Simpson 1941, Edward J. Gallagher, 

Treasurer - David Maloney Squantum. 

194244, Paul Ryan, Quincy. 

Torey Montesi Chairman Marine Parade , o^ <- .. , n , 

Aicu u ri. cxM I I. 1945, Manuel Prada, 

A! Shaughnessy Chief Marshall Squantum 

Nate Sherman Chairman Booster Tickets i r,^^ i, .. ^ 

1/ .u I /-u n r. , 1946, Kenneth Yoerger, 

Kenneth Lavers Chairman Program Book jown River 

Wes Watson Chairman Finance Committee 

Ray Cunningham Chairman Miss Quincy Bay „ 1947-48, William J. Sands, 

Al Woodman Chairman Outside Line ^^"^"^""i- 

DonMathewson Chairman Inside Line w '^'*^' ^^^ert G. Stuart, 

Frank Carroll Chairman Ocean Race ^^'^"'''^^^■ 

Jack White Chairman Entertainment 1950, E. Carlton Brown, 

Sal Gallinaro Chairman Rendezvous '^^'"^ ^'^''^^■ 

Bernard McCourt Chairman Gala Night '951, C. Russell Bradley, 

Mike Horowitz Chairman Photos Wollaston. 

George Perrow Chairman Outboards 1952, Torsten Youngquist, 

Bob Blaisdell Chairman Special Invitations Quincy. 

Roger Snowman Safety 1953, Stanley Rawson, 

Bernie Reisberg, Doug Benedict Coast Guard Auxiliary Squantum. 

Arthur Morrissey Harbor Master 195 4, Dan Campbell, 

Nate Sherman Prizes Merrymount. 

Ken Fallon Jr Radio 1 955, George Hodges, Town 

Charles Ross Radio River. 

Chic Valicenti Press 1 956, Paul Lynch, Wollaston. 

Henry Bosworth Press 1957, D. Foster Taylor, 

John Gauthier Swimming Quincy. 

Edward J. Gallagher Historian ,953^ Edward Spiers, 

John O'Neil Registrations Squantum. 

Jerry O'Neil Publicity j 959^ William Huyghe, 

Robert Hopkinson By-Laws Merrymount. 

^'''^ ^^"^'■d ■ ^■'''- Bay Fleet Captain 19^0, ^Everett Hoxie, Town 

River. 



^.P u 




WILLIAM MUNROE 
President 
Quincy Bay Race Week 

1961, John Aitken, 
Wollaston. 

1962, Vincent McCabe, 
Quincy. 

1963, William T. Moran, 
Squantum. 

1964, Charles Wing, Town 
River. 

1965, Fred Casey, Wollaston. 

1966, Charles Romano, 
Quincy. 

1967, Edward E. Simpson, 
Squantum. 

1 968, William DiTocco, 
Wessagussett. 

1969, John Robertson, Town 
River. 

1970, Leslie Brierley, 
Wollaston. 

1971, Thomas Marcel, 
Quincy, 

1972, F. Gordon Davis, 
Squantum. 

1973, 1. Wesley Watson, 
Wessagussett. 




WOLLASTON 



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Clear reception in your home, 
car, trailer, or boat. 

Guaranteed lowest prices. 

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W. Quincy 471-1257 



Rte 3A Next To 
Winter Garden Cohasset 
383-6640 



And our Newest Store: 

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Farmers' Market 




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Page 12 Quincy Sun Thursday, August 1 , 1974 



Remick, Bermuda Cup 

Ocean Race Racing Saturday, Sunday 



wt^ 



0^2v% 





RACE WEEK COMMITTEE includes, front row, from left, Charles Wing, Bernard McCourt, Dave 
Maloney, Ken Lavers, William Munroe, Ed Simpson, Joe Bergamo, Nate Sherman, John Pazyra, and Mac 
Winer. Second row, Charles Romano, Sal Gallinaro, Gerard Neal, Jerry Maloney, Leonard Carvitt, Doug 
Benedict, Wilton Kelly, Bob Hutcheon, Ray Nash, Sumner Given, Jack White, Jim Conso. Third row, 
Dick Rawson, Art Milmore, Phil Goodwin, Torey Montesi, George Perrow, Ed deVarennes, Bernie 
Reisberg, Norman Rogers, Ray Cunningham, John Tinlin, John O'Neill, Ted Walsh. Fourth row. Chuck 
Reynolds, Richard Patten, Robert Larsen, Wen Watson, Gordon Davis, Albert Woodman, John E. 
Murphy [honorary] , and Al Shaughnessy. 

[Atlantic Photo Service] 





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HIN6HAM HARBOP 

749-9686 



Two consecutive days of 
ocean racing sponsored by the 
Quincy Bay Race Week 
Association to stimulate 
continued interest in the cruising 
type of sailboat are set for this 
week-end. 

The Frank E. Remick ocean 
race wUl be held Saturday in two 
fleets so popular has this 
attraction become. Fleet 1 
consists of boats from 26 feet 
overall length to 45 feet overall 
and Fleet 2 for boats from 17 
feet waterline length to under 26 
feet overall length. 

In 1959 the trophy was 
presented to the Quincy Bay 
Race Week Association by Frank 
F. Remick for competition 
between ocean racing: sailboats. 
Because of the large number of 
boats competing it was decided 
to divide the race into two 
fleets. Remick again presented 
the Association with a second 
trophy for tiie winner of Fleet 2. 

Last year George Prout won 
the Fleet 1 honors and Dick 
Haley the Fleet 2 race for the 
second year in a row. 

The silver punch bowl has 
been in the custody of the 
Quincy Club for better than half 
a century. It was presented to 
the City of Boston in 1905 for a 
Boston to Bermuda race which 
was never held. In 1911 the city 
again placed the cup in 
competition to become the 
permanent possession of the 
winner. That race was won by 
Mollis Burgess in his sloop, Marie 
L. 

Burgess made the Quincy Y.C. 



the trustee of the silver bowl to 
be placed in annual competition. 
In 1968 the Quincy Y.C. 
presented the trophy , to the 
Quincy Bay Race Week 
Association for Race Week 
competition. Dick Haley won 
this trophy in 1972. 

The Harry Warner Memorial 
trophy race will be held on 
Sunday, Aug. 4, after the start 
of the Boston to Bermuda Cup 
race. Taking part in this contest 
will be cruising type trimarans. 

In last year's Bermuda Cup 
Race the winner was N. Marcus' 
"Silkie" of the Metropolitan 
Yacht Club. Runner-up in the 
ocean race was Dick Haley of 
the South Shore Yacht Club 
who sailed his "Checkmate". 
Following them were J. Gilbert's 
"Irish Mist", Corinthian Yacht 
Club and G. Prout's "Mt. Lion 
Later" Hying the colors of the 
Boston Yacht Club. 

The cup, a silver punch bowl, 
was originally established as a 
trophy for the Boston to 
Bermuda race. The race was 
never held with the Quincy 
Yacht Club coming into 
possession of the silver bowl in 
1911 when Hollis Burgess won it 
for a Labor Day ocean race. 

In all of the races the trophies 
will be held by the winners until 
Race Week of the following year 
when they will be returned to 
the Association. An engraved 
keeper trophy will be awarded 
each winner for his permanent 
possession. 



.^^^-:- 



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What we mean is that we'll 
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Insurance Agency, Inc. 




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(ieorge K,. Rilev 
.lohii T. RioIlN jr. 



Quincy, Mass. Tel:472-0610 

^ #/«»,«»«, I^avid F. nouley 
Ronald J. Stidson 



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• Gator Trailers 

• Draw-Tite Hitches 




Thursday, August 1 , 1974 Quincy Sun Page 13 



37th Annual Event 



Quincy Race Week Gets Bigger, Better 



By JAMES COLLINS 

Quincy Bay Race Week now 
underway for its 37th year has 
become a popular water sports 
showcase and spectacular. 

Quincy Yacht Club, 
celebrating its 100th anniversary 
this year as the granddaddy of 
South Shore clubs, is host. 

A year ago more than 400 
boats and some 1,500 sailors 
competed in the daily events and 
social activities. This year's Race 
Week Association President 
William Munroe, a past 
commodore of the Wessagussett 
Yacht Club estimates a bigger 
and better event. 

Racing is being held each day 
from one of the participating 
yacht clubs. Racing got 
underway Wednesday at Quincy. 



Today [Thursday] the Town 
River Club will be host, using 
the facilities at Wessagussett. 
Friday the Braintree Yacht Club 
will have the honors at the same 
facilities. Saturday Wollaston 
will play host; and Sunday the 
Metropolitan Yacht Club will 
use the facilities at Squantum. 

Friday night, the gala night 
will be held at the Quincy Yacht 
Club and Rendezvous Night will 
be held on Saturday, Aug. 3, at 
the Town River Yacht Club. 

The colorful Marine Parade 
will be held Sunday, starting at 
noontime with the boats leaving 
Town River and proceeding 
from Wessagussett to Quincy 
along Manet Beach [Houghs 
Neck] off Nut Island and 
Wollaston Beach to the 
Squantum Yacht Club. 



Braintree Donates 2 Trophies 



The Braintree Yacht Club has 
donated two additional trophies 
for ocean racing competition. 

On Saturday, Aug. 21, a race 
from Quincy Bay to Marblehead 
will be conducted for the 
Kenneth Whorf Memorial 
Trophy. Whorf, a former 
member of the club was a 



skipper in many of the ocean 
races conducted in past years. 

The following day the fleet 
will compete for the Tony 
Barcellas trophy. The race will 
start at Marblehead and will 
finish in Quincy Bay. The race 
honors Barcellas who has been a 
member of the club for 20 years. 



CLARK CRAFT MARINA 



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GLASPAR 
SEA STAR 

at the 

BOSTON HARBOR MARINA 
Tel: 328-7160 




QUINCY BAY RACE WEEK officers are David Maloney, treasurer, Kenneth Lavers, vice president, 
William Munroe, president and Edward Dimpson, secretary. 



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Page 14 Quincy Sun Thursday, August 1 , 1974 




• Appraisers • Marine Surveyors 

• Consultants • Adjusters 



Quincy Boat & Engine Co. 

NEW & USED BOATS and ENGINES 
INSIDE STORAGE and REPAIRS 




Fibreglass Repairs 

koeeoeeooooe 




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ATTENTION BOATERS 

RECYCLE your used boating gear! This Fall & 
Winter we will display your acceptable used 
equipment* at a mutually agreed on price. When the 
item is sold, you will receive a merchandise credit good 
towards any purchase in the store. Get that used 
equip, out of your garage & into Marine stores where 

it can earn money for you. 

ntsu 
vMall 



%noyei" 

Si marirre stores 

"nautical things for boat and home' 



^ 



i 






i5i 
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826-5566 Gerald Winokur, Prop. Open 10 to TO ts 



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WELCOME TO ^^ 
WORLD 'tl^ 
FAMOUS 



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on 

COHASSET 

HARBOR 

383-1700 



AGAIN THIS YEAR 
A HOLIDAY AWARD 

• Lumheons and Dinners 

• After Theatre Special Menu 

• Ocean View from every Seat 

• Choose your own Seafood 
from our indoor ocean pools 

• Finest Charcoal steaks 
and chops 

Al Tino at the Organ Bar Nightly 

Tommy Vitole and his Orchestra 

Fri. & Sat. Eves. 



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MERCURY SALES • SERVICE SINCE 1947 
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NINSHAM. MA»S. 02041 



74«.IS03 




WOLLASTON YACHT CLUB officers are Vice Commodore Doug Benedict, Commodore Robert 
Hutcheon and Rear Commodore Leonard Carvitt. 

Yachtsmen Have Tradition 
Of Excellence To Live Up To 



Yachtmen taking part in the 
37th annual Quincy Bay Race 
Week which opened Wednesday 
for five days have a tradition of 
excellence to live up to. 

Established in 1938 by the 
Quincy, Wollaston, and 
Squantum clubs who formed the 
association Quincy Bay Race 
Week has been an outstanding 
success ever since. In the years 
that followed Town River Y.C. 
and Wessagussett joined up to 
make the event an area success. 

Edward P. Shaw of the 
Wollaston Club was the first 



president. Other officers 
included Roy McPherson of the 
Quincy Club as the first vice 
president; George Hey of 
Squantum, treasurer and Arthur 
Leavitt first secretary. 

Former Mayor and Senator 
Thomas S. Burgin was named 
honorary chairman and presided 
over the year's first activities. He 
provided a trophy for the Adams 
Class and his successor as 
honorary chairman, former 
Boston Mayor Maurice J. Tobin 
set up another in 1939. He 
became Governor and was chief 



of the judges for the Marine 
Parade in 1946 which had the 
largest number of entries. 

In the following years the 
Merry mount club dissolved and 
was succeeded in membership by 
the Wessagusset club. Last year 
the Braintree and Metropolitan 
clubs were added to the 
Association. 

Among the prizes added to 
the competition are the Remick 
Trophies and awards in memory 
of James B. Findlay, Howard 
Gannett, John Reynolds and 
Fred Hunt. 



Colorful Marine Parade Sunday 



One of the most colorful 
marine spectacles and unique in 
yachting events will be the 
Marine Parade which will pass 
near enough to the shoreline to 
be viewed by many South Shore 
residents. 

It will start Sunday, Aug. 4, at 
noontime from the Town River 
Yacht Club overlooking Town 
River. Leading the fldtiila oi 

boats will hf> tlit> Oninrv; Polirp 

Boat, Guardian, under the 
command of Captain Joseph 
Lind. 



The parade will proceed past 
the Quincy Yacht Club and Nut 
Island going through the West 
Gut; along Manet Beach, Post 
Island, Wollaston Beach, to the 
Squantum Yacht Club. 

Al Shaughnessy is chief 
marshall and Charles Romano is 



marine parade chairman. As in 
the past, trophies and prizes will 
be awarded and presented at a 
later date to the most 
attractively decorated power 
boats. Invitations have been 
extended to all 68 yacht clubs in 
Massachusetts to participate. 



Smooth 
Sailing 



Commissioner 



GEORGE 



Mcdonald 



Sunny Skies 




Quincy's Own Newspaper 




LUNCHEON 

SPECIALS 
11 TO 4 P.M. 



Walsh's 
Restaurant 



Just minutes from Wollaston Beach 
and Boating Centers, evening dinner 
specials from 4-10 p.m? Salad Board 
free every evening with your dinner 
and all day Sunday. Friday night 
dinner served in the charming 
Quincy Room from 5-9. 



V BlLtlNGS ROAD" 
NORTH pUINCV" 



77^*1508':: 



Thursday, August 1 , 1974 Quincy Sun Page 15 




QUINCY YACHT CLUB officers are Vice Commodore Richard Paten, Commodore Bernard McCourt 
and Rear Commodore Robert Larsen. 

Quincy Race Week Program 



Wednesday, July 31 - Racing, 
Quincy Yacht Club, Commodore 
Bernard McCourt, host, 1:30 
p.m. Large boats outside line, 
1:30 p.m. Small boats inside 
line. 

Thursday, Aug. 1 - Racing, 
Town River at Wessagussett 
Yacht Club, Commodore Sal 
Gallinaro, host, 1:30 p.m. Large 
boats outside line, 1:30 p.m. 
Small boats inside line. 

Friday, Aug. 2 - Racing, 
Wessagussett and Braintree at 
Wessagussett Yacht Club, 
Commodores Ray Nash and 
John O'Neil, hosts, 1:30 p.m. 
Large boats outside hne, 1:30 
p.m. Small boats inside line. 

Friday [evening] Aug. 2 - 
Gala Night at Quincy Yacht 
Club, hosts, QBRW President 



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at HINGHAM SHIPYARD 




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Also Open Evonings 



♦•••••••••••••^ 






Best 
Wishes 
Quincy 

Bay Race 

I 







^ Week* 






* 644 HANCOCK STREET, 4. 

* WOLLASTON 4TE-742S » 
» ♦ 

* JACK LYDON Jr. ♦ 
>f Director ^ 



William Munroe and 
Commodore Bernard McCourt, 
Booster tickets required plus one 
dollar each. 

Saturday, Aug. 3 - Racing, 
Wollaston Yacht Club, 
Commodore Robert Hutcheon, 
host, 1:30 p.m., Large boats 
outside line, 1:30 p.m. Small 
boats inside line. Small boat 
registration starting at 11 a.m. at 
the Squantum Yacht Club. 
Remick ocean race starting time 
10:30 a.m. 

Saturday [evening] Aug. 3 - 
Rendezvous Nite At Town River 
Yacht Club, hosts QBRW 
President William Munroe and 
Commodore Sal Gallinaro. 
Dancing for skippers and crews. 
Booster tickets required plus one 
dollar. 



Sunday, Aug. 4 - Racing, 
Squantum and Metropolitan at 
Squantum Yacht Club, 

Commodores Joseph Bergamo 
and Mort Weiner hosts, 1:30 
p.m. Large boats outside line, 
1:30 p.m. Small boats inside 

line. Marine parade starting time 
12 noon from Town River Yacht 
Club. Registration from 8-11. 
Chief Marshal Al Shaughnessy, 
Chairman Torey Montesi. Ocean 

racing: City of Boston Bermuda 
Cup and Harry Warner Memorial 
Trophy Races. Starting Time: 
10:30 a.m. 

Trophy Night - To be held at 
the Town River Yacht Club 
Sept. 6 at 8 p.m. All winners and 
guests invited. 



GAFFEY YACHTS 



82 BORDER ST. 



383.1960 



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24 Hour round-th&-clock service on 

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28 Intervale St., Quincy 02169 

Telephones 479-0880 337-9810 





|Quality Boat Paint 
Under Water Caulking 
Irons Grappling 

iNylon Line 
Compasses 
lYacht Log Book 

Bilge Pumps 
Anchor 
Yacht Blocks 

Rails Bow 
Alcohol Stove 
iCleats 
Ensign-Yacht 

Winches 

Eyes Bow 
Electric Stoves 
Keys 



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QUINCY 479-5454 



4^ Anchors Aweigh ^^ ^ 



Page 16 Quincy Sun Thursday, August 1 , 1974, 

■ft 



Good Luck Good Seas 

Senator And Mrs. 

Arthur Tobin 

And Family 



■ft 



'i^i^Sf.if.tf.l^if.i^if-i^i^i^i}-^^^^^^^ 



BEST WISHES 

FOR A SUCCESSFUL WEEK 

Representative 
And Mrs. Cliff 

MARSHALL 



STEVE 
MEHLS 




BOAT HOUSE 

NEW ENGLAND 

SAILING HEADQUARTERS 

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Home of flie newest International and Olympic 
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International 470 and 420 
International Laser 
International Tornado Cat 




TOWN RIVER YACHT CLUB officers are Vice Commodore Gerald Maloney. Commodore Sal Gallinaro. 
Rear Commodore James Conso and Fleet Captain Chuck Reynolds. 

Last Year's Winners 



• Harry Warner Memorial 
Trophy - cruising type trimarans, 
L. Bedell's "Barbara Ann". 

• Ensign Class, Richard 
Callahan, Hingham Yacht Club, 
66% points. 

• Hobie 14 Class, Arthur H. 
Milmore, Quincy Yacht Club, 
4'/2 points. 

• Mercury Class, N. C. Suman, 
Westwood, AVi points. 

• 210 Class, Fran Charles, 
Cohasstt Yacht Club, 121 Vi 
points. 

• Hustler Class, George C. 
Wey, Wessagussett Yacht Club, 
lAVi points. 




H^<^((((«((^j^(((($|((^i^((i^i^(^((((<(|(((<(<^i^<^i^i(i((((((((^(((((^(^ 



DANIEL F. X. DAVIS 



Insurance Agency 



MARINE INSURANCE 



Last year's Quincy Bay Race 
Week winners included: 

• Bermuda Cup - N. Marcus, 
"Silkie", Metropolitan Yacht 
Club. 

• Turnabout White Fleet, 
John Bowen, Wollaston Yacht 
Club, 26% points. 

• Turnabout Green Fleet, Jen 
Miles, Cottage Park Yacht Club, 
1 1 V4 points. 

• Turnabout Red Fleet, Bob 
Kilday, Wessagussett Yacht 
Cli h, 25 points. 

• Lark Class, Hatch Brown, 
MIT Sailing Association, 27% 
points. 



Headquarters For 

PACEMAKER 

Albin T/Cabin Diesel 

AFA Sailboats 

including the ever popular 

Aqua Cat 

IN STOCK for 
IMMEDIATE DELIVERY 

Sailboat Sale 
15% - 20% off 

18' Sloop, cuddy cabin 
16' Sloop, cuddy cabin 
14' Sloop, performance boat 
12' Sloop, excellent Trainer 
12' Aqua Cat 

Also ready for 
IMMEDIATE DELIVERY 
Selected Used Boats - 
both Power & Sail 

BOSTON HARBOR 
MARINA 

I 542 E. Squantum St. No. Quincy 
328-0600 Open 7 Days I 



• Hobie 16 Class, Richard 
Chapman, Oakdale, 13% points. 

• Thistle Class, E. P. Tweedy, 
Cottage Park Yacht Club, 8% 
points. 

• Tempest Class, Rick Hewitt, 
Ottowa, Ont., Crittania Yacht 
Club, 3VA points. 

• 1 10 Class, John Kennerson, 
Hull Yacht Club, 71 Vi points. 

• Lightning Class, Mike 
O'Keefe, Squantum Yacht Club, 
bVi points. 

• Laser Classic, Michael 
Morrissey, Squantum, Score of 
4.5. 

• Flying Scot Class, Jack 
McCarthy, Cohasset Y.C. and 
Jim Beaton, Squantum, tied 
with 31 1/3 points. 

• 470 Class, Elkins Brothers, 
Hull Yacht Club, 22% points. 

• Sunfish Class, Jack Malaney, 
Hingham Yacht Club, 4.5 points. 

• 420 Class, Charles Quigley 
3rd, Boston Y.C, 40'/2 points. 

• Sprite Class, Joe Feeney, 
South Boston Yacht Club, V/2 
points. 

• lornado Class, Bryan 
ivconard, Hingham Yacht Club, 
41 '/a points. 

• Thunderbird Class, Number 
929. John St. Hall, 1 3 '/z points. 

• Turnabout Blue Class, John 
Dolbec, Wollaston Yacht Club, 
19'/2 points. 

• International Snipe Class, 
Sue Tabor, Cottage Park Yacht 
Club, 32 points. 

• Etchell Class, Bob 
Campbell, South Boston Yacht 
Club. 



SHADOW OF THE CUSTOM HOUSE 



Professional Sailing and Racing Instruction 



173 MILK ST., CORNER OF MILK & INDIA 

BOSTON 



BOSTON HARBOR SAILING CLUB, a new public 
membership sailuig program on Boston Harbor is offering a 
new round of sailing instruction programs beginning the weeks 
of August 5th and 12th. 



TELS. 482-1000 • 482-1001 • 482 1002 



23 Indian Spring Road, Milton, Mass. 



698-4545 



Courses offered are Beginning and Intermediate Sailing, a 
Racing Adjunct to the Intermediate Sailing, a Racing Adjunct 
to the Intermediate Course, and a 10 hour ON THE WATER 
skill development program. Of special interest to racing 
enthusiasts is the Intermediate Course with the Racing 
Adjunct. There are 42 hours of professional instruction on fine 
tmiiny and expert trimming of the boat and sails for racing. 
Among the instructors will be Mr. George O'Day, Olympic 
Gold IVi(-d<il Winner and holder of numerous World Sailing 
titles. Ail !;utriiction is qivon ahuard 27 foot Olympic Solings. 



PiTsoiis m.iy also join the club and sail daily on BostonHarbor 
for as httlf as S9G For further information call, visit or write: 



^it^ti<ti<t^4«W4^i«titii*tiit4^^^^^«t^^^^ 



THE BOSTON HARBOR SAILING CLUB 
139 Lewis Wharf, Boston 523-2619 



Thursday, August 1 , 1974 Quincy Sun Page 17 



Sailors Of All Ages Compete For Handsome Trophies 



Sailors of all ages will be 
competing for a number of 
handsome and coveted trophies 
during Quincy Bay Race Week. 
The Capt. James Berwick 
Fin lay Memorial Trophy 
presented to the Quincy Yacht 
Club in 1948 by Alfred W. 
Finlay in memory of his son. 

He did much during his 
lifetime to advance the sport of 
yachting on Mass. Bay and the 
trophy is awarded annually to 
the yachtsman considered to 
have made the most outstanding 
record or to have performed 
some signal act of sportsmanship 
during Race Week. 

Last year's winner was Robert 
Marks. It is annually engraved 
and remains in the custody of 
the Quincy Yacht Club. An 
engraved replica will become the 
permanent possession of the 
winner. 

The Howard Gannett 

Memorial Trophy has been 

presented annually since 1954 in 

memory of Howard Gannett 

I who served for more than 50 

years as secretary of the Race 

Committee and was a member of 

[the Race Committee from 1938 

until his death in 1953. It is 

presented annually to the race 

[week winner in a class to be 

jselected by the committee. 

The Fred Hunt Memorial 

[trophy is a perpetual award 

[presented annually since 1966 

Iby The Patriot Ledger in 

Imemory of the late yachting 

leditor who served for more than 

Ithree decades. The trophy is 

jpresented annually to the 

Iskipper who has proven his 

lability in the Race Week series; 

Ihas demonstrated a high degree 

lof sportsmanship; and the 

|willingness to help others in the 

idvancement of yacht racing. It 

|is held one year by the home 

;lub of the recipient who 

receives a replica for his 

)ermanent possession. 

The Reynolds Memorial 
Trophy was presented to the 
Quincy Bay Race Week 
Association in 1966 by the 
family of John Reynolds, an 
Irdent supporter of and a 
[kipper in the Day Sailor Class 
intil his death in 1965. 

The trophy is awarded 

mnually and is held by the 

/inner for a year until race week 

)f the following year when it is 

returned to the Association. A 

suitable engraved keeper trophy 

lis being awarded annually to the 

jwinncr of the previous year for 

[his permanent possession. The 

.1973 winner was George C. 

[Shey. 



Good Luck 

Quincy Bay 

Race Week 
Sailors 

WARD 4 

COUNCILLOR 
JAMES A. 

SHEETS 

AND 
FAMILY 



Two handsome trophies have 
been presented by Frank E. 
Remick to the Quincy Bay Race 
Week Committee to stimulate 
interest in cruising type 
sailboats. The Remick ocean 
race is divided into two fleets, 
Fleet 1 for boats 17 feet to 26 
feet overall won last year by 
George Prout of the Boston 
Yacht Club; and Fleet 2 for 
boats, 26 to 45 feet overall. 
Winners last year were Richard 
Haley of the South Shore Yacht 
club and Michael Conley. 

The City of Boston Bermuda 
Cup which has been in the 
custody of the Quincy Yacht 
Club for over 50 years was 
presented by the City of Boston 
for a yacht race from Boston to 
Bermuda. 

While that race was never held 
the city in 1911 put up the cup 
for an ocean race to become the 
permanent possession of the 
winner. The winner was Hollis 
Burgess, a Quincy Yacht Club 
member, in his sloop, Marie L. 
Burgess made the Quincy Yacht 
Club the trustee of the cup 
which was to be placed in annual 
competition as a perpetual 
trophy. 

In 1968 the Quincy Yacht 
Club donated the cup to the 
Quincy Bay Race Week 
Association for race week 
competition. The winner is 
presented a Keeper trophy 
which is to be suitably engraved 
, for his permanent possession. 
The 1973 winner was Peter 
Marcus of the Boston Yacht 
Club. 

The 1300 Trophy has been 
presented each year since 1960 
to the Quincy Bay Race Week 
Association by Radio Station 
WJDA to demonstrate its great 
interest in Quincy Bay Race 
Week and to stimulate racing 
interest among the junior class. 
This beautiful trophy is awarded 
annually and becomes the 
permanent possession of the 
winning skipper in the popular 
Turnabout Class, the 1973 
winner was John Dolbec of the 
Wollaston Club. 

The Commodore Isadore 




SQUANTUM YACHT CLUB officers 
and Rear Commodore John White. 



Bromfield Trophy will be 
presented for the first time by 
the Commonwealth National 
Bank of Boston. It will be 
presented annually to a Race 
Week winner. He will be 
presented a suitably engraved 
keeper trophy for his permanent 
possession. 

The Harry Warner Memorial 
Trophy was presented to the 
Quincy Bay Race Week 
Association and the Town River 
Yacht Club in 1968 by the 
Warner Family as a perpetual 
trophy to be raced for by 
cruising type tramarans. It is 
annually engraved and is held by 
the winner until Race Week the 
following year when it is 
returned to the Association. A 
suitable keeper trophy is to be 
awarded to the winner for his 
permanent possession. 



are Vice Commodore Gerald Neal, Commodore Joseph Bergano 



BOAT INSURANCE 

ALL TYPES OF MARINE INSURANCE 

H 

T 



HENRY E. 
THORNTON 

REAL ESTATE 
AND 
INSURANCE AGENCY 




419 HANCOCK ST. 
479-1107 



MONAHAN'S MARINE 

Boating Headquarters For 




PACESHIPP.14. 



John.son Outboard Motors 
Glastron, Cohimbian And 
Aquasport Fibergla.s.s Boals 
Paccship and Snark Sailboats 
.Mirrocraft, Duranaiitic, 
Smokercraff And Meyers Aluminum Boats 
Old Ibwn Canoes and Kayaks 
Zodiak Inflatables 
Dilly - Holsclaw - EX Loader 
Boat Trailers 

FULL LINE OF MARINE HARDWARE 

AND SUPPLIES AT LOW DISCOUNT 
PRICES 



Visit Our Displays At 396 and 403 
Washington St.^ (Route 53) 
. Weymouth - 335-2746 



■ w » * »^ 



BOSTON BOA 
SALE-A 

Com* on down & look around, 
your purpot* we'll do buslnvts 

NEW BOATS 



T SALES, INC 
-THON 



If there's a boat that serves 
nil 



• BOSTON WHALER 

9 Squail 
ir & 13 Sports 
16 Montauk 
16 Kalama 

• EGG HARBOR 

46' Sedan Sporltishprman 
871 N. Diesels. Equipment 
too Numerous to Mention. 

• GRADY WHITE 

19 Weekender Outboard 
21' Cliesapeaks 10. 

• NORTH AMERICAN 

19' Otlshoie OB 
22' Sunchasei OB. 

• OOAY 

?0 - 23' - ?7' 

• REVEL CRAFT 

197;i ?4' Auainn I 0, ?& HP. 

• SILVERTON 

2-7' Sedan Single :';'.'> 
30 Sedan Single 330 

• STAMAS 

26' Americana 225 CMC. 




USED BOATS 

•72J5 JOHN AUMANO 225 1.0. 
'63 25 CHRIS CRAFT 185 HP. 
'66 25 LUMRSF.B. 225HP. 
'71 28 UNIFLITE TWIN 225 H.P. 
•73 33 EGG HARBOR TWIN DIESELS 
'70 34 PACEMAKER SEDAN 225 1 
'70 37 ULRICHSENFB. TWIN 225 
'6S 38' TROJAN MOTOR YACHT DSLS 

BROKERAGE 

•t? 20 ItllTBAM 8<Hi( MAN 219 10. 

•72 30 REmC«AfrE»f, 225 M.C. 

•7132 LUHRS SEDAN 130 fWC 
•»l 43 fGC HARBOB MOTOR YACHT 
•71 37 EGG H4RB0R SEDAN TWIN 2CS| 
'7141 EGG HAR80A SPT FISH DSIS 



SPECIAL OF THE SALE 



WANT TO GO FAST? 

New 1972 19' Formula 
22.S OMC Coaming Pads 
X Bolster. Full Curtains. 

LIST 7090 NOW 5500 



170 GRANITE AVE. 
DORCHESTER. MASS. 

825-4466 



Before Casting 
Off 

Go 'Sea' 



Doran & Horrigan 
Insurance Center 



19 Billings Road 

North Quincy 

479-7697 



4^ Anchors Aweigh u^ ^ 



Page 16 Quincy Sun Thursday, August 1, 1974, 

■it 
■H 

■H 
-ft 

■ft 



-(I 
■^ 

■it 
■» 



Good Luck Good Seas 

Senator And Mrs. 

Arthur Tobin 

And Family 



BEST WISHES 

FOR A SUCCESSFUL WEEK 
Representative 
And Mrs. Cliff 

MARSHALL 



snvE 

MEHLS 




BOAT HOUSE 

NEW ENGLAND 

SAILING HEADQUARTERS 

HIGH PERFORMANCE IS OUR SPECIALTY 

14 North Street 
Hingham, Mass 02043 
(617) 749-2898 

COMPLETE BIQOING SERVICE 

& MAINTENANCE MATERIALS 

Home of the newest International and Olympic 
class sailboats 

International 470 and 420 
International Laser 
International Tornado Cat 




TOWN RIVER YACHT CLUB officers are Vice Commodore Gerald Maloney, Commodore Sal Gallinaro, 
Rear Commodore James Conso and Fleet Captain Chuck Reynolds. 

Last Year's Winners 



• Harry Warner Memorial 
Trophy - cruising type trimarans, 
L. Bedell's "Barbara Ann". 

• Ensign Class, Richard 
Callahan, Hingham Yacht Club, 
66% points. 

• Hobie 14 Class, Arthur H. 
Milmore, Quincy Yacht Club, 
4'/2 points. 

• Mercury Class, N. C. Suman, 
Wcstwood, 4'/2 points. 

• 210 Class, Fran Charles, 
Cohassct Yacht Club, 121 Vi 
points. 

• Hustler Class, George C. 
Wey, Wessagussett Yacht Club, 
74!4 points. 




•(^j^{^((i(((j^i^(^i(i((((^(^(($«^((<((((^(($$«^$i(<((^i((^$i^ 



DANIEL F. X. DAVIS 



Insurance Agency 



MARINE INSURANCE 



Last year's Quincy Bay Race 
Week winners included: 

• Bermuda Cup - N. Marcus, 
"Silkie", Metropolitan Yacht 
Club. 

• Turnabout White Fleet, 
John Bowen, WoUaston Yacht 
Club, 26y4 points. 

• Turnabout Green Fleet, Jen 
Miles, Cottage Park Yacht Club, 
1 1 '^ points. 

• Turnabout Red Fleet, Bob 
Kilday, Wessagussett Yacht 
Cli h, 25 points. 

• Lark Class, Hatch Brown, 
MIT Sailing Association, 27% 
points. 



Headquarters For 

PACEMAKER 

Albin T/Cabin Diesel 

AFA Sailboats 

including the ever popular 

Aqua Cat 

IN STOCK for 
IMMEDIATE DELIVERY 

Sailboat Sale 
15% - 20% off 

18'Sloop, cuddy cabin 
16' Sloop, cuddy cabin 
14' Sloop, performance boat 
12' Sloop, excellent Trainer 
12' Aqua Cat 

Also ready for 
IMMEDIATE DELIVERY 
Selected Used Boats - 
both Power & Sail 

BOSTON HARBOR 
MARINA 

I 542 E. Squantum St. No. Quincy 
328-0600 Open 7 Days! 



• Hobie 16 Class, Richard 
Chapman, Oakdale, 13% points. 

• Thistle Class, E. P. Tweedy, 
Cottage Park Yacht Club, 8% 
points. 

• Tempest Class, Rick Hewitt, 
Ottowa, Ont., Crittania Yacht 
Club, 37% points. 

• 1 10 Class, John Kennerson, 
Hull Yacht Club, 71'/2 points. 

• Lightning Class, Mike 
OKeefe, Squantum Yacht Club, 
b\z points. 

• Laser Classic, Michael 
Morrissey, Squantum, Score of 
4.5. 

• Flying Scot Class, Jack 
McCarthy, Cohasset Y.C. and 
Jim Beaton, Squantum, tied 
with 31 1/3 points. 

• 470 Class, Elkins Brothers, 
Hull Yacht Club, 22% points. 

• Sunfish Class, Jack Malaney, 
Hingham Yacht Club, 4.5 points. 

• 420 Class, Charles Quigley 
?id, Boston Y.C, 40Vi points. 

• Sprite Class, Joe Feeney, 
South Boston Yacht Club, 7y2 
points. 

• lornado Class, Bryan 
i^conard, Hingham Yacht Club, 
41'/2 points. 

• Thunderbird Class, Number 
929. John St. Hall, 13'/2 points. 

• Turnabout Blue Class, John 
Dolbec, Wollaston Yacht Club, 
19'/2 points. 

• International Snipe Class, 
Sue Tabor, Cottage Park Yacht 
Club, 32 points. 

• Etchell Class, Bob 
Campbell, South Boston Yacht 
Club. 



SHADOW OF THE CUSTOM HOUSE 

173 MILK ST., CORNER OF MILK & INDIA 

BOSTON 



Professional Sailing and Racing Instruction 

BOSTON HARBOR SAILING CLUB, a new public 
membership siiilunj program on Boston Harbor is offering a 
new round of sailing instruction programs beginning the weeks 
of August 5th and 12th. 



TELS. 482 1000 • 482 1001 • 482-1002 



23 Indian Spring Road, Milton, Mass. 



Couiies offer^^d are Beginning^ ancLlr^termediate Sailing, a 
Racing Adjunct to the Intermediate Sailing, a Racing Adjunct 
to the Intermediate Course, and a 10 hour ON, THE WATER 
skill development program. Of special interest to racing 
enthusiasts is the Intermediate Course with the Racing 
Adjunct. There are 42 hours of professional instruction on fine 
tuning and (!xpert trimmmg of the boat and sails for racing. 
Among the instructors wiM \w Mr. George O'Day, Olympic 
Gold Med.il Winner and holder of numerous World Sailing 
titles. Ail !!Utruct!on is cjiven abo.ircl 27 foot Olympic Solings. 



698-4545 



for lis 



' also)oin the club iMM\ sail daily on Boston Harbor 
as 890 For further inform.ttion call, visit or write: 



;iiti^,t,j4,l^it(t<i ii^iii^^i'ti^t ,ji^t«ti't$Ui«tii i4'U<tit^iiit^i $(ti$$(t^ 



THE BOSTON HARBOR SAILING CLUB 
139 Lewis Wharf. Boston 523 2619 



I 



i 



Thursday, August 1 , 1974 Quincy Sun Page 17 



Sailors Of All Ages Compete For Handsome Trophies 



Sailors of all ages will be 
competing for a number of 
handsome and coveted trophies 
during Quincy Bay Race Week. 

The Capt. James Berwick 
Fin lay Memorial Trophy 
presented to the Quincy Yacht 
Club in 1948 by Alfred W. 
Finlay in memory of his son. 

He did much during his 
lifetime to advance the sport of 
yachting on Mass. Bay and the 
trophy is awarded annually to 
the yachtsman considered to 
have made the most outstanding 
record or to have performed 
some signal act of sportsmanship 
during Race Week. 

Last year's winner was Robert 
Marks. It is annually engraved 
and remains in the custody of 
the Quincy Yacht Club. An 
engraved replica will become the 
permanent possession of the 
winner. 

The Howard Gannett 
Memorial Trophy has been 
presented annually since 1954 in 
memory of Howard Gannett 
who served for more than 50 
years as secretary of the Race 
Committee and was a member of 
the Race Committee from 1938 
until his death in 1953. It is 
presented annually to the race 
week winner in a class to be 
selected by the committee. 

The Fred Hunt Memorial 
trophy is a perpetual award 
presented annually since 1966 
by The Patriot Ledger in 
memory of the late yachting , 
editor who served for more than 
three decades. The trophy is 
presented annually to the 
skipper who has proven his 
ability in the Race Week series; 
has demonstrated a high degree 
of sportsmanship; and the 
willingness to help others in the 
advancement of yacht racing. It 
is held one year by the home 
club of the recipient who 
receives a replica for his 
permanent possession. 

The Reynolds Memorial 
Trophy was presented to the 
Quincy Bay Race Week 
Association in 1966 by the 
family of John Reynolds, an 
ardent supporter of and a 
skipper in the Day Sailor Class 
until his death in 1965. 

The trophy is awarded 
annually and is held by the 
winner for a year until race week 
of the following year when it is 
returned to the Association. A 
suitable engraved keeper trophy 
is being awarded annually to the 
winner of the previous year for 
his permanent possession. The 
1973 winner was George C. 
Shey. 




Two handsome trophies have 
been presented by Frank E. 
Remick to the Quincy Bay Race 
Week Committee to stimulate 
interest in cruising type 
sailboats. The Remick ocean 
race is divided into two fleets, 
Fleet 1 for boats 17 feet to 26 
feet overall won last year by 
George Prout of the Boston 
Yacht Club; and Fleet 2 for 
boats, 26 to 45 feet overall. 
Winners last year were Richard 
Haley of the South Shore Yacht 
club and Michael Conley. 

The City of Boston Bermuda 
Cup which has been in the 
custody of the Quincy Yacht 
Club for over 50 years was 
presented by the City of Boston 
for a yacht race from Boston to 
Bermuda. 

While that race was never held 
the city in 1911 put up the cup 
for an ocean race to become the 
permanent possession of the 
winner. The winner was Hollis 
Burgess, a Quincy Yacht Club 
member, in his sloop, Marie L. 
Burgess made the Quincy Yacht 
Club the trustee of the cup 
which was to be placed in annual 
competition as a perpetual 
trophy. 

In 1968 the Quincy Yacht 
Club donated the cup to the 
Quincy Bay Race Week 
Association for race week 
competition. The winner is 
presented a Keeper trophy 
which is to be suitably engraved 
for his permanent possession. 
The 1973 winner was Peter 
Marcus of the Boston Yacht 
Club. 

The 1300 Trophy has been 
presented each year since 1960 
to the Quincy Bay Race Week 
Association by Radio Station 
WJDA to demonstrate its great 
interest in Quincy Bay Race 
Week and to stimulate racing 
interest among the junior class. 
This beautiful trophy is awarded 
annually and becomes the 
permanent possession of the 
winning skipper in the popular 
Turnabout Class, the 1973 
winner was John Dolbec of the 
Wollaston Club. 

The Commodore Isadore 




SQUANTUM YACHT CLUB officers 
and Rear Commodore John White. 



Bromfield Trophy will be 
presented for the first time by 
the Commonwealth National 
Bank of Boston. It will be 
presented annually to a Race 
Week winner. He will be 
presented a suitably engraved 
keeper trophy for his permanent 
possession. 

The Harry Warner Memorial 
Trophy was presented to the 
Quincy Bay Race Week 
Association and the Town River 
Yacht Club in 1968 by the 
Warner Family as a perpetual 
trophy to be raced for by 
cruising type tramarans. It is 
annually engraved and is held by 
the winner until Race Week the 
following year when it is 
returned to the Association. A 
suitable keeper trophy is to be 
awarded to the winner for his 
permanent possession. 



are Vice Commodore Gerald Neal, Commodore Joseph Bergano 



BOAT INSURANCE 

ALL TYPES OF MARINE INSURANCE 

H 

T . 



HENRY E. 
THORNTON 

REAL ESTATE 
AND 
INSURANCE AGENCY 




419 HANCOCK ST. 
479-1107 



MONAHAN'S MARINE 

Boating Headquarters For 




PACESHIPP».14. 



Johnson Outboard Motors 
Glastron, Columbian And 
Aquasport Fibcrglas.s Boats 
Pacesliip and Snark Sailboats 
Mirrocraft, Diiranautic, 
Sniokcrcralt And Meyers Aluminum Boats 
Old lown Canoes and Kayaks 
Zodiak Inflatables 
Dilly - Holsclaw - EX Loader 
Boat Trailers 

FULL LINE OF MARINE HARDWARE 

AND SUPPLIES AT LOW DISCOUNT 
PRICES 



Visit Our Displays At 396 and 403 
Washington St., (Route 53) 
. Weymouth - 335-2746 



BOSTON BOAT SALES, inc. 
SALE-A-THON 



Com* on down & look around, 
your purpoit we'll do business 

NEW BOATS 

• BOSTON WHALER 

9 Squall 
ir * 13 Sports 
16' Montauk 
16 Kalama 

• EGG HARBOR 

46' Sedan Sporlfistierman 
871 N. Diesels. Equipment 
loo Numerous to Menlion. 

• GRADY WHITE 

19 Weekender Outboard 
21' Chesapeake 1.0. 

• NORTH AMERICAN 

19' Offshore O B 
22' Sunchasei O.B. 

, * OOAY 

ro - 23' - r>7' 

• REVEL CRAFT 

1973 ?4' Avainn 10. 7i, HP. 

• SILVERTON 

?7' Sedan Single :';>?; 
30' Sedan Single 330 

• STAMAS 

26' Aniericane 225 O.M.C. 



if there's a boat that serves 
!!!! 

USED BOATS 

•72 25 JOHN AL1.MAND 225 1.0. 
•63 25 CHRIS CRAFT 185 HP. 
'66 28 LUHRSf.B.225HP, 
•71 2J UNIFLITETWIN225HP. 
•73 33' EGG HARBOR TWIN DIESELS 
•70 34 PACEMAKER SEDAN 225 1 
•70 37'ULRICHSENF.B. TWIN225 
•69 38' TROJAN MOTOR YACHT DSLS 

BROKERAGE 

'J7!0 B6RTRAMB*HHIH*fl21[IIO. 
•72 30 REVEL CdAfTEXP. 225 H,P. 
•71 JriUHItS SEDAN m F WC 

•CI n res HARDOD MoroR vacht 

•71 17 EGG HARBOR SEDAN TWIN ;tSl 
71 41 EGG HARBOR SPT. FISH DSLS 



SPECIAL OF THE SALE 



WANT TO GO FAST? 

New 1972 19' Formula 
22.S OMC Coaming Pads 
A Bolster. Full Curtains. 

LIST 7090 NOW 5500 



170 GRANITE AVE. 
DORCHESTER. MASS. 

825-4466 



Before Casting 

Off 




Go 'Sea' 



Doran & Horrigan 
Insurance Center 



19 Billings Road 

North Quincy 

4797697 



Page 18 Quincy Sun Thursday, August 1 , 1974 



ipy ' W L ' [ -»*; 




METROPOLITAN YACHT CLUB officers are Rear Commodore Mac Winer, Vice Commodore Nate 
Sherman, Commodore Mort Weiner and Fleet Captain Larry Belsky. 

Gala, Rendezvous Nights 
Social Highlights Of QBRW 



Two outstanding social events 
are among the traditional 
highlights of Quincy Bay Race 
Week. 

Gala Night will be held at the 
Quincy Yacht Club, senior yacht 
racing unit in Boston Bay, 
Friday night featuring a surprise 
program. President William 
Munroe of the Quincy Bay Race 
Week Association and 
Commodore Bernard McCourt 
will extend a cordial welcome to 
all members of the club and 



NEW ENGLAND 
PROPELLER SERVICE 

\ /^->. DISrRlBU'ORi 

1 MICHIGAN PROPEUtDS 
INBOARDfc OUTBOARD 
■^ AtL MAKES REPAIRED 
in n'^ ) SHAfTS-BEARINCS-ZINCS 



visiting yachtsmen and their 
guests. A special menu has been 
planned to be followed by 
entertainment and dancing. 

Race Week officers in 
addition to Munroe, include, 
Kenneth Lavers, vice president; 
Edward Simpson, secretary; and 
David Maloney, treasurer. Aides 
to Commodore McCourt will be 
Rear Commodore Robert Larsen 
and Vice Commodore Richard 
Patten. 



The second event will be 
"Rendezvous Night" Saturday at 
the Town River Yacht Club with 
dancing for skippers and crews. 
President William Munroe and 
his staff of officers of the 
Quincy Bay Race Week 
Committee will be assisted by 
Commodore Sal Gallinaro and 
his staff in welcoming the guests. 
Memories of previous Race Week 
will be recalled as plans for 
another successful season next 
year are discussed. 



Reds, Blues Win 
In Squirt House League 



w» 



9S VON HILLERN ST. 
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In the Squirt House League 
the Reds edged the Greens, 3-2, 
with Steve Baylis scoring two 
goals and Chris Gorman one and 



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Gorman and Kevin White having 
assists. 

Andy Shannon was 
outstanding in goal. For the 
Greens Kevin Craig had two 
both goals and Tommy Murphy 
and Mike Marshall had assists. 

The Blues defeated the 
Orange team, 3-1, with Bob 
Flynn scoring twice and Mike 
Sullivan once. Mike Rafferty, 
Dick Mahoney, Paul Egan and 
Dave Allen had assists. Mark 
Tenney scored for the Orange. 



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#Around The Buoys 

Grogan Brothers 

QYC Triple 
Interclub Winners 



By JAMES COLLINS 

The Grogan Brothers of the 
Quincy Yacht Club, Kevin and 
Edward, were triple winners in 
week-end yachting victories. 

In addition to capturing the 
Thunderbird trophy they also 
came home with two other top 
prizes. 

They were awarded the 
Commodore Bernard E. ' 
McCourt Trophy for winning the 
Quincy to the Boston Lightship 
Race and the Amos L. Merritt 
Championship, a handsome 
silver trophy, for being the first 
boat from the Quincy Yacht 
Club Fleet to cross the finish 
line. Both young men have been 
members of the Quincy Yacht 
Club for two years. 

The Wollaston and Squantum 
Yacht Clubs joined forces last 
Saturday in the annual Quincy 
Bay Races. Henry Welsh led the 
fleet home in the Hustler Class. 
Patrick Morrissey eked out a 
scant 8-second victory in the 
Laser Class over Robert Dolbec. 
The Flying Scots from the 
Squantum Club made a good 
showing with Margaret Durkin's 
No. 1558 coming home first in 1 
min. 30 sec. Ann Conroy's No. 
1213 finished second. The fleet 
was small as most of the boats 
were at Marblehead Race Week. 

The results: 



Sunday Interclub Race 

QUINCY YACHT CLUB 

Thunderbirds, Time Margin: 4 
min. - Leprechau, Kevin and Ed 
Grogan, Quincy Y.C., Ruth 
Charles Moore, Quincy Y.C., 



Escapade, Bob Sandberg, 
Quincy. 

210 Class [13 starters] Time 
Margin: 4 min. - Fanfare, Francis 
Charles, Hull Y.C., Femme 
Fatale, Jack Spanks, Quincy 
Y.C., Miss Priss, Bob Reis, 
Quincy Y.C. 

Hustler Class, [9 starters] 
Time Margin 1.5 min. - 
Bewitched, Henry Welsh, 
Wollaston Y.C, Honora, McCabe 
Bros., Quincy; Alibi, John 
McMann, Wollaston. 

420 Class [5 starters] Time 
Margin 1 1 min. 4 sec. - Spindrift, 
Bob Dolbec, Quincy Y.C, No. 
21963, No Name; No. 17753, 
No Name. 

470 Class (4 starters] Time 
Margin 1 1 min. 4 sec. - No. 718, 
John and Donna McShane; No. 
640, No Name; No. 490, No 
Name. 



SATURDAY'S RACE 
Wollaston Yacht Club 

Hustler Class, Time Margin 1 
min. 18 sec. - Won by Henry 
Welsh; Richard Spargue 2nd; and 
Richard Barger, third. 

Laser Class, Tim Margin 8 sec. 
- Won by Patrick Morrissey; 
Robert Dolbec 2nd; and Thomas 
Nee, 3rd. 

National 110 Qass, Time 
Margin 1 min. 29 sec. - Won by 
John Dolbec; Douglas Smith, 
2nd; Terry Kelly, 3rd. 

Flying Scots, Squantum 
Yacht Club, Time Margin 1 min. 
30 sec. - Won by No. 1558, 
Margaret Durkin;No. 1213, Ann 
Conroy, 2nd. 



Flags Stolen Again 
At Youth Arena 



Who's got the flags? 

For the thifd time in nine 
months, that same question 
must be asked. 

Jack Powers, manager of 
Quincy Youth Arena, reported 
that three flags were stolen from 
the rink List week: the Canadian 
flag, the State Flag and the 




Quincy Youth Hockey 
Association flag. 

These three flags and the 
American flag were stolen from 
the rink last October. They were 
recovered, Powers said, two 
weeks later. 

In March the four flags were 
again stolen. That time they 
were never returned. 
Replacement cost totaled an 
estimated $89. Powers said: 

"If anyone has the flags, we'd 
like him to return them, so as 
not to keep incurring 
replacement expenses." 

He appealed to the residents 
of Quincy "to check with their 
kids," assuming if youngsters 
took them they would display 
the flags in a cellar, in a 
bedroom, or somewhere. 




SUBSCRIPTION FORM 




I Quincy Bay Race Week I 
Representative 

; JOSEPH E. 'JOE' BRETT * 









4- 
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FILL OUT THIS SUBSCRIPTION BLANK AND MAIL 

TO TNE QUINCY SUN 1101 HANCOCK ST.; OUINCY 021IS 

B2 ISSUES FOR $4.00 
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( ] PLEASE BILL ME FOR $4.00 

OUT OF STATE $5.00 





•Senior League 

Whitman Cats 
Claw Clovers, 10-5 



Thursday, August 1, 1974 Quincy Sun Page 19 



The Whitman Cats exploded 
for seven goals in the final 
period to top the Quincy 
Clovers, 10-5, in the Quincy 
Senior Summer Hockey League 
at the Youth Arena. 

Whitman took a 3-1 lead into 
the wild third period, Tim 
Morrill having scored Quincy 's 
goal in the opening session. The 
third period saw 1 1 goals being 
scored. 

Quincy scored two quick one 
to tie the score as P. J. Flaherty 
scored after only 19 seconds 
with an assist for John Cunniff 
and Cunniff scored 1 1 seconds 
later with Frank Guest and Bob 
Fowkes assisting. Whitman then 
scored four goals for a 7-3 lead 
and the best Quincy could do 
was add a goal by Flaherty at 
8:05 with assists for Cunniff and 
Guest and another by Larry 
Fitzgerald at 14:09 with Morrill 
assisting. 

The Atlantic Flames handed 
the Boston Budmen their first 
loss of the season, 9-5, scoring 
five goals in the final period. 

The Walpole Chiefs, in last 
place, shocked the Newman 
Club. 8-1. 

Next Wednesday Atlantic will 
play Whitman at 6:30, Quincy 
will meet Newman Club at 8: 15 
and Walpole will face Boston at 
10 p.m. 



SENIOR STANDINGS 

W L T Pts.GF GA 
Boston 

Budmen 5 11 1 1 43 28 
Newman 

Club 4 2 1 9 39 37 
Atlantic 

Flames 4 3 8 48 35 
Whitman 

Cats 2 4 1 5 36 40 
Quincy 

Clovers 2 4 1 5 32 40 
Walpole 

Chiefs 2 5 4 30 47 

SCORING LEADERS 

G A Pts. 
Buddy Powers, 

Budmen 4 12 16 

Vic Puntiri, 

Flames 9 6 15 

Bob Ferriter, 

Newman 8 7 15 

Vic Stanfield, 

Budmen . 5 9 14 

P.J. Flaherty, 

Clovers 3 11 • 14 

Brian Leahy, 

Flames • 7 6 13 

Ted Thorndike, 

Cats 5 8 13 

Frank Guest, 

Clovers 9 3 12 

Dan Sullivan, 

Flames 8 4 12 

Joe Fidler, 

Flames 7 5 12 

Jim Doyle, 

Budmen 6 6 12 

Mike Martin, 

Chiefs 6 6 12 



• Executive League 

Greens Edge Golds, 
Blues, Reds Tie 



The Greens edged the Golds, 
2-0, in the Summer Executive 
Hockey League at the Quincy 
Youth Arena. 

Fran Whalen scored both 
goals with Bob Hayes and Bernie 
Toland assisting on the first and 
Bibby Lewis and Hayes on the 
second. 

The Blues and Reds played to 
a 3-3 tie with the Reds rallying 
from a 3-1 first period deficit. 
Jack Powers scored the first goal 
for the Blues with Marty Tolson 



assisting and Tolson made it 2-0 
with assists for Powers and 
Kevin White. Jack Hurley scored 
the first Red goal unassisted and 
Gary DeCoste's goal put the 
Blues in front, 3-1, also 
unassisted. 

In the second period Joe 
Chase scored for the Reds with 
Jim Daley and Hurley assisting 
and Dick Reinhardt tied it in the 
third period with Jack 
MacDonald and Wally MacLean 
having assists. 



INTERNATIONAL FIGHT 

The first international box- bout between British cham- 
ing niatdh in history took {»on Jack Slack and French 
place on July 29, 1754, with a c»ntender Jean Petit. 



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• Midget House 



White Team Takes Top Spot 



The White team took over 
sole possession of first place in 
the Midget House League with a 
6-5 win over the Greens, while 
the Orange team, which had 
been tied for the lead, dropped a 
5-4 decision to the Reds. 

Tom Bamberry scored two 
goals, Mike Marks, Jim Connors, 
Mike McCauley and Steve Ryan 
one each for the Whites, while 

•Bantam House 



Mark Paolucci and Bamherry 
had two assists each, Dan 
Maurano and Connors one 
apiece. For the Greens Joe Carty 
had the hat trick, Ed Laracy and 
Bob Carmody one goal each. 
John O'Donnell, Hugh 
McDermott, John Cavanaugh 
and Brian Nevins had assists. 



Dennis Bertoni paced the Red 



win with two goals and Rich 
DiPietro, Bill Monahan and Ed 
McDonald had one each. Bertoni 
also had two assists, Pete Higgins 
and DiPietro one each. For the 
Orange team Bill Morrison, Jeff 
Harrison, Jim Constas and Kevin 
Doyle had the goals and Paul 
Flanders had three assists, Jeff 
Harrison, Morrison and Doyle 
one each. 



Reds Upset Greens, 
Yellows, Blues Win 



The Red team handed the 
Greens their first loss in the 
Bantam House League, 5-4, but 
the Reds held on to their league 
lead. 

Mike Soldano had two goals, 
Mike Walsh, Ken Kustka and Pat 
Bamberry one each for the Reds, 
while Kustka had two assists. 

For the Greens Dave Lewis 
had two goals, Steve White and 
Toil! Pistorino one each with 



• Pee Wee House 



Mark O'Brien and Mike 
Bondarick having assists. 

The Yellows defeated the 
White team, 6-2, with Billy 
Deitsch having two goals, Bobby 
Hayes, Ron Mariano, Mike Walsh 
and Danny Higgins one each. 
Tommy Brennan had two assists, 
Hayes, Bryan McGilvray, 
Deitsch, Billy Allen and Kevin 
O'Leary one each. For the 
Whites Danny Sullivan, Brian 



Duane had the goals and John 
Kelly, Mike Bennett and Jackie 
Quigg assists. 

The Blues defeated the 
Orange team, 4-1, with Ken 
Kustka having two goals, Lou 
Mathews and Kevin Welch one 
each. John Kelly had two assists, 
Welch, Mathews, John Norton 
and Mike Van Tassell one each. 
Paul Palmer scored for the 
Orange. 



Blues Hold Lead, 
Yellows, Reds Win 



The Blue team kept its 
two-game lead in the Pee Wee 
House League with a 6-3 win 
over the Orange team. 

The win was the sixth in seven 
games for the Blues. Bob Currier 
had the hat trick for the 
winners, Freddie Palmer had two 
goals and Mark Veasey the 
other. Mark Boussy and Bob 
Larson had two assists each, 
Tommy Mullen and John Lyons 
one apiece. For the Orange team 
Scott Richardson had two goals 
and Ed Campbell one with 
assists for Charlies McManus and 
Joey Lamparelli. 

The Yellows bombed the 

• Mite House 



Whites, 11-4, as Bobby Beniers 
erupted for six goals, Tony 
Chiochio had two, Steve Walsh, 
Tommy Heffernan and Bob 
Welch one each. Walsh had three 
assists, Mike Doherty four, 
Heffernan and Jim Paolucci two 
each, Mike Nevins, ChioChio and 
Kevin Coyman one each. Mark 
Messina had two goals for the 
Whites, Mike Quigg and Dick 
Ryan one each with two assists 
for Billy Mathews, and one each 
for Tom McHugh, Paul Melia, 
Billy Doran and Quigg. 

The Reds edged the Greens, 
7-6, due partly to the 
outstanding goal tending of P. T. 



Kelley for the Reds who, despite 
six goals, made some brilliant 
saves. 

Robbie Zanardelli had the hat 
trick for the Reds, Robbie Craig, 
Eddie O'Gara, Eddie Doherty 
and Karl Nord one goal apiece. 
Nord had four assists, Craig 
three, Zanardelli two, Johnny 
Toland, John Keeley, Billy 
O'Neil, O'Gara and Dick Wright 
one each. For the Greens Kevin 
McCormick had two goals, Paul 
Dunphy, Timmy Joy, Joe 
Carroll and Paul McGrath one 
apiece. John Martin had three 
assists. Chuckle Marshall, 
McGrath, Carroll and 
McCormick one each. 



Orange Team Holds Lead 



The Orange team held the 
lead in the Mite House League as 
it tied the Blues, 6-6. 

Ricky Cicchese had the hat 
trick for Orange and Danny 
Kelly, Mark Loughman and Jeff 
Murphy had the other goals. 
Kelly had three assists, Dan 
Roden and Chicchese one 



apiece. 

Scott Messina exploded for 
five goals for the Blues and Bob 
Drury had the other. Messina 
had the only assist. 

The Greens walloped the 
Reds, 10-2, as Bobby Forman 
had four goals, Bobby McCabe 
and Steve White two each, Mark 



McManus and Dennis Shannon 
one each. White had three assists 
and John O'Connor two. For the 
Reds Chris Hurley had both 
goals and Mathew Norton and 
Tom Houlihan had assists. 



The Yellows topped 
Whites, 6-4. 



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Page 20 Quincy Sun Thursday, August 1 , 1974 

•Junior Baseball 

HN Edges VFW, 
Bombs Sears 



In the semi-finals of the Junior 
Baseball League Houghs Neck 
swept two straight edging VFW, 
4-3, and walloping Sears, 14-3. 

In the first game, an extra 
inning affair, GregOriola and Jeff 
Giordani shared the pitching for 
Houghs Neck. Bob Cronin and 
Tom McFarland had doubles for 
Houghs Neck and other hits 
were collected by Greg Maddan, 
McFarland, Matt Kenny and 
Giordani. Paul O'Toole had two 
triples and other VFW hits were 
collected by Gordon Spencer 
and Bruce Tobin. 

In the romp over Sears, 
winning pitcher Mike Abboud 
had 10 strikeouts and walked 



only one, Abboud and Giordani 
had doubles and Madden, 
Giordani, Steve Notorangelo, 
McFarland and Kevin McKinnon 
had other hits. Steve Picot had a 
home run and Mark Messina and 
Bob Flynn other hits for Sears. 
Sears bombed Kiwanis, 19-1, 
with Messina having three for 
four and Picot and Bill Deitsch 
two hits apiece. Chris Baker and 
Brian Deitsch combined for a 
spectacular play in the sixth. 
Deitsch was the winning pitcher, 
giving up just one hit, striking 
out 12 and walking three. Mike 
Martin and Kiwanis' hit while 
BUly O'Connell and Bill 
O'Malley played well on defense. 



Gino's Wallops Elks 
In Babe Ruth loop 



In the Quincy Babe Ruth 
League Gino's walloped Elks, 
16-3. 

Joe Dean and Bill Ross had 
three hits apiece and every other 



member of the team had one hit. 

Bersani's nipped Elks, 8-7, on 

Jim McConville's squeeze bunt 

in the 10th inning. Paul Marini 
hit a home run for Elks. 



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CHAMPIONSHIP BOUND are St. John's Cadets of Quincy, South Shore Deanery Winners. From left, 
[seated] are Joe DiCesare, Rick Gilbody, Don Heath, Bob Hennelly, Ernest Jaffarian and Brian Jolley. 
Standing, Manager John Noonan, Joe Larezzo, Jeff Marcel, John Morris, Rick Ryan and Jack 
Buonopane, coach. Missing from photo is Dave DiGiusto. 

[Photo by Steve Allen & Associates] 

St. John's Cadets In CYO State 
Championships Next Weeic 



St. John's Cadet baseball team 
will compete in the CYO state 
championship playoffs Monday 
Aug. 5 at Merrymount Field, 
Quincy, beginning at 6 p.m. 

St. John's, winners of the 
Quincy-South Shore Deanery 
Cadet Division, will play the 

winner of a game to be played 



Sunday, Aug. 4 at Merrymount 
between St. Peter's of 
Dorchester and St. Anthony's of 
Revere at 4 p.m. 

St. John's lost but one game 
in regular season play and has 
played exhibition games with 

several Quincy Babe Ruth 
League teams. In a recent game 



with the Quincy Police team, 
winners of the Division 
championship, St. John's lost a 
hard fought contest 9 to 4. Mike 
Murphy was the winning pitcher 
for the Police team. Joe Lavezzo 
pitched the entire game for St. 
John's. Don Heath, Lavezzo, 
Brian Jolley and Rick Ryan were 
the big hitters for St. John's. 



Quincy Softball 



American League All-Stars 
Seek Revenge Saturday Night 



The Quincy Softball League's 
annual allOstar game will be 
played Saturday at 8 p.m. at 
Rotary Field. 

This year the American 
Leaguers will seek revenge for 
the 10-3 thrashing it took at the 
hands of the Nationals last 
season. 

Two players from each team 
have been selected by their 
teammates. 

The American League team 
will include; 

Ed Miller and Denny Clifford 
of A & T Movers, Tom 
Colclougli and Doug McLain, 
Beau's; Ron Wilson and Paul 
DeLuca, Berry Insurance; Rick 
Caron and Russ Costa, Bocce 
Club; Dave Drew and Herbie 
Shaw, Hofbrau; Bill East and 
Ray Connerty, Marcel Corp.; 
Jim Sullivan and Jerry D'Arigo, 
McJnnis Corp.; Bob Graham and 
Bill LaRaia, Pagies. Pitchers will 
be Gus DeBoer and Charlie 
Young of A & T and and Terxy 
Cullen of Marcel. Ed Miller of A 
& T is manager. 

From the National League 
will be: 

Ernie Zimmerman and Chuck 
Hughes of Barry's Deli, Bob 
Kelly and Richard Kelly, Barry's 
Ship Haven; Steve Martinson and 
Dave Breen, Bill's Texaco; James 
Blake and Bill Simon, County 
Line; Scott Healey and George 
McCall, Sabina's; Don Conboy 
and Brian Colleran, Walsh's; 



Gary McGrath 


and Bob 


Parros of Sabina's 


and Bob 


Swirbalus, Wells. 


Pitchers are 


Meehan of Ship Haven 




Dick Taylor of 


Wells, Mike 






AMERICAN LEAGUE 


NATIONAL LEAGUE 
EAST 


EAST 


W 


L 


W 


L 


A & T Movers 
Hofbrau 


15 
14 


5 
7 


Barry's Ship 

Haven 1 1 
Alumni Cafe 10 


7 
9 


Beau's Place 
Bocce Club 


lU 
8 


10 
11 


County Line 9 
Jonathan's 6 


10 
15 


Mclnnis Corp. 


2 


17 


Walsh's 

Restaurant 6 


15 


AMERICAN LEAGUE 


NATIONAL LEAGUE 


WEST 




WEST 






W 


L 


w 


L 


Marcel Corp. 


17 


2 


Sabina's 16 


4 


Mr. Kelly's 


14 


2 


Well's Grille 14 


5 


Sully's Spa 


14 


6 


Dee Dee's 10 


11 


Pagies 


5 


14 


Barry's Deli 7 


13 


Berry Ins 


5 


15 


Bill's Texaco 2 ' 


18 



Starsiak, Condon Lead CYO 

mne Del ore making a bogy on 
the 15th and 16th coming home. 



Dick Starsiak of Quincy, the 
Ponkapoag Golf Club champion, 
and blond Steve Condon of 
Newton, the New England CYO 
champion, led a field of 100 
with two -over par rounds of 74 
each in the 35th annual CYO 
Senior Division open gold 
championship at Ponkapoag 
Golf Course in Canton. 

In the big boy's division 
Condon had a steady day with 
nine straight pars on the front 



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Senior Babe Ruth 



Thursday, August 1 , 1974 Quincy Sun Page 21 



South Shore All-Stars Seek N.E. Title At Stamford 



The South Shore Senior Babe 
Ruth League All-Stars, including 
four members of Quincy's Data 
Services team, will seek the New 
England championship this 
weekend at Stamford, Conn., 
after winning the state title last 
weekend in Dennis. 

The team leaves today 
[Thursday] for the N.E. 
tournament. 

South Shore breezed through 
the state tourney unbeaten, 
winning three games in a row in 
the double elimination event. 

In the opener Quincy's Gerry 
Bugden hurled South Shore to a 
2-1 win over the host Dennis 
team in extra innings as it took 
advantage of loose play by 
Dennis. 

In the second game against 
the tourney favorite, defending 
champion Hopedale, South 
Shore romped, 7-2, with an 
offense and strong pitching by 
Hanover's Scott Tait. Quincy's 
Dave Power led the attack with 



three for four including a home 
run. 

South Shore faced a tired 
Dennis team again in the third 
game and the hosts, forced to 
play four games to stay in 
contention, could not contain 
the Soutn Shore attack and Bill 
Barry pitched the deciding win. 

Hanover's John Hopkins, 
South Shore's catcher, was 
named the tournament's most 
valuable player for his 
outstanding handling of three 
pitchers and his overall hustle 
behind the plate. 

Quincy's four players are 
Bugden, first baseman Power 
and infielders Scott Messina and 
Mark Jaehnig. Mike O'Connor, 
manager of Quincy's Data 
Services team, is one of the 
coaches. 

The other team competing in 
the state tourney was 
Somerville. Six teams will be 
playing in the New England 
championship event. 



Quincy Track Club 
Generates Interest 



Anyone who doubts that the 
recently-formed Quincy Track 
Club has hiked interest in track 
in the city has only to stop in at 
Veterans Memorial Stadium any 
Monday, Tuesday or Wednesday 
evening after 6 o'clock to see the 
proof. 

On these evenings anywhere 
from 50 to 100 boys and girls, 
mostly the younger ones, work 
out diligently under the 
watchful eyes of Lou Tozzi, 
North Quincy High coach, QTC 
secretary and director of the 
weekly meets held each 
Thursday at 6 p.m. at the 
stadium. 

Tozzi is assisted by some of 
the older boys on the club 
including Paul Doherty, Bill 
Popsie and Lee Watkins, who 
put the youngsters through a 
program of calisthenics and 
supervise them in various events. 

"We are delighted with the 
interest being shown, especially 
among the younger boys and 
girls," Tozzi said. "The nine, 10 
and 11 -year olders are learning 
just what track is all about and 
they are very interested and are 
improving all the time. 

"However, I would still like to 
see more people over the age of 
30, both men and women, join 
the club and compete in the 
weekly meets." 

Saturday the dub will bus 
about 60 boys and girls 9 to 15 



to Brockton for a New England 
AAU-sanctioned meet at 
Brockton High, which gets 
underway at noon. 

Last week's meet saw five 
double winners, Joe Irvine, 
Nancy McCarthy, Chris 
Kennedy, Janice Kelly and Paul 
Cody. Actually, Janice Kelly was 
a triple winner as she anchored a 
winning relay team. 

Last week's winners: 

Shot put - Boys 9-1 1, George 
Marten : boys 12-15, Chris 
Green; open age men, Paul 
Doherty. 

Long jump - Girls 12-15, 
Janice Kelly; boys 12-15, Paul 
Cody. 

100-yard dash - Boys 9-11, 
Joe Irvine; boys 12-15, John 
Ladd; open age men, Lee 
Watkins; girls 9-11, Nancy 
McCarthy; girls 12 and older, 
Janice Kelly. 

220-yard dash - Open age 
men, Chris Kennedy. 

440-yard run - Boys 9-11, Joe 
Irvine; boys 12-15, Jack 
Macheras; open age men, Chris 
Kennedy; girls 9-11, Nancy 
McCarthy. 

Low hurdles - Boys 9-11, 
Dean Zoia; boys 12-15, Paul 
Cody; girls 9-11, Theresa Biagini; 
girls 12 and older, Paula Church. 
880-yard run - Boys 12-15, 
Marty Levenson; open age men, 
Bart Petracca; girls 12 and older, 
Dotty Irvine. 



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THE SOUTH SHORE Senior Babe Ruth League All-Stars are the state champions and seek the New 
England title this weekend in Stamford, Conn. Front, left to right. Bob Woods, John Hopkins, Scott 
Tait, Bruce Kirkland, Tom Madjered, Paul Messina of Quincy, Kevin Ryan, Coach Mike O'Connor of 
Qumcy and batboy Anthony Twohig. Back, Manager Don Tait. Pat Quigg, Jack Krauss, Dan Cronin Bill 
Barry, Gerry Bugden of Quincy, Rick Ferolli, Dave Clapp, Tom Barron, Mark Jaehnig of Quincy Dave 
Power of Quincy, Coach Tony LaGreca and Kevin Finn. 

S.S. Slushettes Plan Banquet Oct. 11 



The South Shore Slushettes 
(formerly Slush League 
Women's Division] will hold a 
banquet for tennis and softball 
members Friday, Oct. 1 1, at the 
Sons of Italy Hall, 161 Kinghill 
Rd, Braintree. 



A social hour will be held 
from 6 to 7 p.m., a roast beef 
dinner will be served from 7 to 8 
followed by award presentations 
and dancing to "The Sfxpence." 

Tickets are limited and are 
now on sale. They are available 



until Aug. 31 from President 
Nancy Marquis, Treasurer 
Connie Delano, softball and 
tennis directors, banquet 
chairwomen Bonnie Schlager 
and her committee of Joan 
Lavoie and Marie Taylor. 



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OPEN SATURDAYS 



Page 22 Quincy Sun Thursday, August 1 , 1974 



Beniquez, Cooper, Burleson 
Big Plus in Sox Flag Drive 



By TOM SULLIVAN 
[Quincy Sun Writer] 

There were a lot of snickers 
when Darrell Johnson, upon 
being named Red Sox manager 
this year, said three of his 
former Louisville and Pawtucket 
players were ready to play major 
league ball and would be with 
the Sox. 

These snickers, however, are 
no more as the three, Juan 
Beniquez, Cecil Cooper and Rick 
Burleson have more than lived 
up to Johnson's expectations 
and are playing major roles in 
putting the Red Sox in the 
driver's seat in the American 
League's Eastern Division. 

Many were skeptical, in 
particular, about Cooper, who 
came up to the Sox near the end 
of the season each of the past 
three years and failed to impress. 

"This kid is definitely ready 
for the majors and he will be 
with us this year and will see 
plenty of action at first base," 
Johnson said. 

Cooper, 24, batting .275 at 
this writing, has done a good job 
both at first base and when used 
as a designated hitter. 

Beniquez, 24-year old Puerto 
Rican, has developed into one of 
Boston's most exciting players in 
years. 



Juan has been on the disabled 
list but is almost ready to return 
to action. During his absence, 
Rick Miller, one of the better 
defensive outfielders in the 
league, has been filling in nicely. 

Burleson, only 23, is one of 
the most pleasant surprises of 
the season. Sent down to 
Pawtucket after spring training, 
he was recalled and has done an 
excellent job filling in at second 
and shortstop. He is outstanding 
on double plays, both starting 
them and being the pivot man. 
Hitting .3 1 7, he has helped put a 
lot of spark into the Red Sox. 

When the Sox were finding 
the going rough and languishing 
in last place early in the season, 
there were shouts of "Bring 
Back Kasko". 

But the fans are singing a 
different tune now and Johnson 
appears to be the man the Sox 
need to make them a solid 

contender. Right now they are 
in a great spot to win the 
Eastern Division flag. Their 
chances, however, were dimmed 
considerably when Carlton Fisk 
suffered torn knee ligaments. 

Juan, who played 16 games 
for the Sox in 1971 and 33 
games in 1972, showed he could 
hit from the start but was erratic 



at shortstop. 

He was converted into a 
centerfielder and has provided 
Sox fans with a lot of action. He 
is getting to be a fine outfielder 
with an adequate arm, was 
batting .272 at this writing and 
has shown dazzling speed on the 
bases. 

One of the main reasons 
Boston is out in front of the 
pack is the "miracle man", Luis 
Tiant, and Johnson gets the 
credit here for the 33-year old 
pitching star being with the Sox. 

In 1971, after Luis was 
dumped by the Minnesota 
Twins, Johnson, then Louisville 
manager, suggested to Red Sox 
brass that they give him a 
chance. 

He was 2-2 with Louisville, 
was called up by the Sox but 
had only a 1-7 record and his 
acquisition didn't seem to be a 
smart move. 

However, the former 
Cleveland standout the following 
year was 15-6 with the league's 
best earned run average (1.91), 

last year was 20-13 and this year 
was 13-7 at this writing after a 
slow start and pitching some of 
the best ball in the majors. He 
appears to get better with age 



Crusader Basketball, Soccer Camp Aug. 25 



Save gas. 

Vacation 
in Mass. 



There*s no place 
jm m- like home 

Mass. 



Boys from the ages of 12 to 
17 will attend the Eastern 
Nazarene College Crusader 
Basketball and Soccer Camp for 
the week of Aug. 25 to 31 at the 
Long Lake Acres Camp in 
Naples, Me. 

The camping party will leave 
Sunday, Aug. 25 at 2 p.m. The 
camp is staffed by college 
athletes. There wilj be 
participation in small groups in 
swimming and boating as well as 
all types of land sports. 



The instructors' staff will be 
headed by Jim Smith, head 
basketball coach and athletic 
director at the host college, and 
Neil Nicoll, head soccer coach. 

In addition Steve Shoff, 
varsity soccer coach at 
Weymouth North High School 
and Bill Mauger, all-conference 
goalie of the Colonial 
Intercollegiate Soccer League, 
will attend and direct a soccer 
clinic on July 29 and 30. 



CITY OF QUINCY 
VOTER REGISTRATION DATES 



EVENINGS FROM 7:00 P.M. to 9:00 P.M. AT THE 

FOLLOWING LOCATIONS: 
Monday, August 5, 1974 

Ward 2 - Fore River Club House, Nevada Rd 
Ward 3 - St. John's School, Phipps St. 
Ward 4 - Gridley Bryant School, Willard St. 

Tuesday, August 6, 1974 

Ward 5 - Wollaston School [Auditorium] Beale St. 
Ward 6 - Quincy School, Newbury Ave. 

Saturday, August 10, 1974 

City Hall - Hancock St. 
From 10:00 A.M. Until 10:00 P.M. 

Tuesday, August 13, 1974 

City Hall - Hancock St. 
From 8:30 A.M. to 10:00 P.M. 

This being the last day for Registration before the 
State Primaries September 10, 1974 

REGISTRATION DAILY, ELECTION DEPT., CITY HALL, FROM 8:30 A.M. 
UNTIL 4:30 P.M. MONDAY THRU FRIDAY 

John M. Gillis 

Clerk, Board of Registrars 




Recreation 
Roundup 




By JOE MOSESSO 

The Quincy Recreation 
Department's summer program 
is now half over, and the 
enthusiasm of the youth of 
Quincy towards the program has 
grown steadily each week. 

Notes music specialist Karen 
Walch, "The playgrounds are 
alive with the sound of music." 
A borrowed phrase but a true 
statement, for the playgrounds 
have been filled with the tuneful 
ringing of childrens' voices. A 
few of the merry songsters have 
been Sue Estrabrooks, Lisa 
Martinelli, Nancy Pasquariello, 
Kathy McClosky and Jean King 
of Atlantic and Pollard's Denise 
Bellivue, Deb Crocker, Liz 
Sullivan and Terry Mele. 

Working with macrame was 
the main activitiy of the popular 
arts and crafts program this past 
week. Specialist Gina Kelly 
reports that some of the best 
creations were done by Brian 
Morris, Tony Quintiliani and 
George Maxwell of Whitweli and 
Labrecque's Mike Monahan, 
Jane Cotter and Sue Boudreau. 

Tennis aspirants around the 
city are perfecting their games 
for the upcoming playground 
tournament, reports tennis 
specialist Betty Vittner. Some of 
the most improved players have 
been, Rich Forrest, Pat Ennis 
and Kim Kowilack of Squantum, 
Welcome Young's BUly and 
Tommy Nee and Diane and 
Patty Cordillo of Heron Road. 
Out on the links were many 
inspired young golfers, led by 
specialist Don Smith. A lot of 
time was spent specifically on 
developing the putting game. 
Those who putted especially 
well were Steve Blazer and Kevin 
Donelin of O'Rourke, Shea 
Rink's Dave and Mike Rossini 
and Atlantic's James Conboy, 
Billy O'Connell and Bobby 
Flynn. 

Recreation Robin Hood Tim 
Flynn reports that his archers 
are i m proving the ir 
marksmanship week by week in 
preparation for the final city 
shootout. A few of the 
merrymen are Labrecque's John 
Connolly, Janice Sines and Mike 
Byork, Hazel Conroy and Roger 
of Snug Harbor and Jean Villa 
and Sheila Connolly of 
Montclair. 

Beautiful stained placques 
were the creations of the 
children in the ceramics program 
this past week. Some of the 
most innovative ones done were 
by Debbie Cavanaugh, Paul 
Murphy, Tracy Nelson, Joanne 
Sarreco, Danny Baker and Joan 
Chimo. 

It was a busy week for nature 
specialists Paula Weidmann and 
Michael Parros, as it was nature 
week. Each day hundreds of 
children were bussed up to 
frolicking Faxon Park, where 
Paula and Mike conducted a 
variety of events such as nature 
hikes, treasure hunts and 
scavenger hunts to name just a 
few. Some of the enthusiastic 
participants were Mike Sullivan, 
John Phelen and Steve Bouttier 
of Merrymount, Whitwell's 
Tommy Hennessy, Paul Banserry 
and Mike Monahan and Pond 
Streets Sal Lorranzo, John 
Dipolos and Terry Roberts. 

Slashing through the waves 
last week were many 
enthusiastic members of the 
Recreation Water Ski program. 
Slaohom skiing was the big hit 
of the week, as many of the 
more advanced skiiers learned to 
ski on only one ski. Some of the 
pros were Mark Gazzola, Robert 
Sullivan, Al McGinnis, Bill 
McDonald and Brian Toomey. 



There was also a lot of aquatic 
action down on the Recreation 
Departments' 13 swim stations, 
as more and more children 
passed swimming tests and 
moved into more advanced 
classes. Some future swimming 
stars are Maura Webb and Ruth 
Shiones of Orchard Beach, Rock 
Island's Chris Fowle and Chris 
Murphy and Fenno's Steve Craig 
and Paula Shaw. 

On the playgrounds this past 
week, Parents Nights were held 
across the city. On Parents Night 
there is always a large variety of 
games, races and other events 
held, but the big favorite of the 
night is of course the food. 
There was plenty of assorted 
delicacies put on picnic tables 
around the city last week, and 
I'm not just talking about hot 
dogs and hamburgers. There was 
pasta, spare ribs and steamed 
clams too. My mouth is watering 
just thinking about it. 

The number one Parents 
Night of the week was held at 
Pond St., where a spaghetti 
dinner was put on through the 
efforts of two outstanding 
Italian playground leaders - 
Cathy Ilacqua and Steve 
Paolucci. A record crown of 75 
people attended the feast. The 
crowd devoured 18 pounds of 
pasta and 140 meatballs, mama 
mia. Special thanks goes to Mr. 
and Mrs. Paolucci and Mr. and 
Mrs. Ilacqua for helping cook 
the meal. Recreation Director 
William F. Ryan would also like 
to thank all playground leaders 
for a job well done in making 
this years Parents Night program 
one of the best ever. 

In sports this week there were 
plenty of exciting hard fought 
battles and some great individual 
performances. In what was a real 
barn-burner Bradford hung on to 
beat a super O'Rourke squad 
34-26 in junior basketball. The 
lead swung back and forth until 
late in the final period when 
Bradford's Ed Tinney and Chris 
Chevaly got a couple quick 
hoops to put the game on ice. 
Bradford's offense was led by 
Joe Shea, Ed Tinney and Chris 
Chevaly, who each scored 10 
points, while O'Rourke's charge 
was led by Greg Oriola and 
Andy Carrara who had 10 and 8 
points respectively. The rematch 
should be a real donnybrook. 

In another close contest, 
Squantum lost a heartbreaker to 
Montclair in midget baseball, 
6-5. With the score 5-4 in 
Squantum's favor with two out 
in the final inning and Timmy 
McEachen on first, Jay Collins 
stepped up to the plate and 
belted a towering home run to 
win the ball game. It was an 
electrifying victory for the 
Montclairites. Will Dudely 
picked up the win, while Dave 
Preskinis absorbed a tough 
defeat. Collins besides his game 
winning homer also had two 
singles. Standouts for the 
disappointed Squantum squad 
were John Lewis and Bob Zabbi 
who both knocked in 2 runs 
apiece. 

In girls sports in junior 
basketball Elm Street won a 
22-14 thriller over Pollard. The 
game was a hard fought battle, 
as neither team could break the 
game open until the final 
minutes, when Elm St's Donna 
Franceschini got a couple of 
clutch hoops and put the game 
away. Franceschini was high 
scorer for the Elm Streeters with 
10 points. She got help from 
Allison Fay (six points] and 
Jane Barron and Carol 
Sandonato who played 
outstanding defense. 



Thursday, August 1 , 1974 Quincy Sun Page 23 




AREA CHRISTIAN SCIENTISTS recently attended an international Youth Meeting at the 
newly-completed Chrutian Science Center in Boston. From the left are William Ellington, first reader. 
First Church of Christ, Saentist, Quincy; June B. Wilson, Milton; Alex Larkin, organist, of Quincy; Peter 
C. Larrmgton of Quincy. 

Local Representatives Attend 
Christian Science Youth Meeting 

branches and societies, not 
including 22 Christian Science 
college organizations. 

At the conference, individual 
commitment to genuine spiritual 
activity was emphasized by 
speakers from Africa, Asia, 
Australia and South America, as 
well as Europe and North 
America. 



Three Quincy men and a 
Milton woman numbered among 
some SOO Mass. Christian 
Scientists attending a recent 
International Youth Meeting at 
the Christian Science Center in 
Boston. 

William Ellington, first reader. 
First Church of Christ, Scientist, 



Alex Larkin, organist, Peter 
Larrington of Quincy and June 
B. Wilson of Milton explored the 
conference theme, "Lord, what 
wilt thou have me do?" together 
with 7,000 other Christian 
Scientists from foreign lands. 

The First Church of Christ, 
Scientist, in Boston has 78 



4,000 Expected To Attend Sept. 15 
Boston Religious Education Congress 



Approximately 4,000 clergy, 
religious, coordinators and 
religious educators including 
some from Quincy, will attend 
the Boston Religious Education 
Congress on Sunday, Sept. 15 at 
Hynes Veterans' Auditorium in 
Boston. 

This one-day Congress will be 
a quick brush-up on new trends 
in religious education. The 
exhibit area will feature over 
100 booths with all the latest 
textbooks, audio-visual 
equipment and services available 



from all over the country. 

Outstanding speakers invited 
to the Congress are: 

Dr. Christiane Brusselmans, 
Belgian theologian and a visiting 
professor at Harvard Divinity 
School and Boston College, who 
will speak on "Sacraments - The 
Center of Family Life". 

Rev. Joseph Champlin, author 
and lecturer with a syndicated 
column in over 90 diocesan 
newspapers, who will discuss 
"Making the Parish a Christian 
Family." 



Rev. Alfred McBride of 
Catholic University who will 
discuss "Adult Education". 

Dr. Rebecca Carroll of 
Baltimore who will speak on 
"Marriage and Family". 

Rev. Regis Duffy, OEM, of 
Catholic University, whose 
address is entitled "The People 
in the Water". 

Pre-registration forms may be 
sent to 1 Lake St., Brighton 
before Sept. 15. Refreshments 
may be purchased at the 
Congress. 



'Love^ Lesson- Sermon At Christian Science Church 



The Lesson-Sermon Sunday at 
First Church of Christ, Scientist, 
20 Greenleaf St., is on the 
subject of "Love". 

The responsive reading 
includes a passage from the 
Book of John: "Beloved, let us 
love one another: for love is of 
God; and every one that loveth 
is born of God, and knoweth 
God. He that loveth not 
knoweth not God; for God is 



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love." [1 John 4] 

Church service and Sunday 



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and August. 



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t«l«plio»» 773-2728 






DEATHS 



Mrs. Peart V. /DunhamJ 
McGarry Murrill, 74, of 102 
Spring St., Rockland, formerly 
of Quincy, at Goddard Memorial 
Hospital, Stoughton, July 23. 

Miss Katherine D. Hardwick, 
88, of Cotuit Road, 
Marstons-Mills, formerly of 
Quincy, at Cape Cod Hospital, 
Hyannis, July 23. 

Clarence G. Jones, 74, of 49 
Ramon Rd, in Quincy City 
Hospital, July 23. 

Mrs. Annetta fOteriJ Rollins, 
84, of 467 Quincy Shore Drive, 
at South Shore Hospital, 
Weymouth, July 23. 

Mario Pomarole, 86. of East 
Squantum St.. at home, July 23. 
Mrs. Rose M. [Kane] 
Bertrand, 77. of 211 Franklin 
St., at a Quincy nursing home, 
July 24. 

Mrs. Nathalie [Nay I Cover, of 
1000 Southern Artery, at 
Quincy City Hospital, July 24. 

George Melikian, 48, of 23 
School St., Hingham, formerly 
of Quincy, enroute to South 
Shore Hospital, Weymouth, July 
23. 

Miss Pauline M. Canniff 49, 
of 15 Plymouth St., at Boston 
City Hospital, July 23. 

Mrs. Stasia fTwarog J DiPalma 
Palmer. 55. of 58 Alfred Road. 
Braintree, formerly of Quincy. 
at Norfolk County Hospital. 
July 25. 

Mrs. Barbara {Morgan/ 
Moloney. 37. of 11212 Crosby 
St., Garden Grove. Calif, 
formerly of Quincy. at home, 
July 23. 

James F. Henehan, 84, of 36 
Marlboro St., at Carney 
Hospital, Dorchester. July 28. 

Ernest A. Livingston, 66, of 
16 St. Germain St.. at Quincy 
City Hospital, July 27. 

Edmund P Tobin, 70. of 
1419 Hancock St.. at the 
University Hospital, Boston, 
July 29. 



Mrs. Gladys (Bradbury/ 
Baum, 48. of 42 Ellington Road, 
at her home, July 27. 

Mrs. Ida J. [Fossati/ Maspero. 
84. at her home, July 28. 

Miss Ruth E. R. Piotti, 76, of 
73 Bicknell St., at Quincy City 
Hospital, July 26. 

Henry L Harrington, 86, of 
262 Harvard St., at Quincy City 
Hospital, July 24. 

Paul O. Nelson, 68, of 7 Oak 
Ave., at Quincy City Hospital, 
July 25. 

Samuel M. Goode, 83, of 105 
Pleasant St., Milton, formerly of 
Quincy. at Lemuel Shattuck 
Hospital, Boston, July 26. 

Mrs. Agnes /Harris/ Yeo, 78, 
of 243 Southern Artery, at the 
Quincy City Hospital, July 29. 
Mrs. Georgiana fSchmitz/ 
Clisham, 87, of 61 WilkinsRoad, 
Braintree, formerly of Quincy, 
at the Crestview Nursing Home, 
July 28. 

Mrs. Louise (Churchill/ 
Johnson. 77, of 149 East St., 
Hingham, formerly of Quincy, at 
the South Shore Hospital. 
Weymouth, July 29. 

Mrs. Anna /Hogstrom/ 
Holmgren. 87. of 1813 Eastridge 
Road, Timonium, Md., formerly 
of Quincy, in Maryland, July 28. 

Mrs. Florence (HorsleyJ 
Smith. 78. of 17 Lebanon St., at 
Quincy City Hospital, July 30. 

John A. Mann, 52. of 575 
Washington St.. July 28. 



Grimwood 

And 

Coletta 

Funeral Home 

Albert J. Coletta 

Director 

603 .idattis St. 

Quincy 

773-1046 



the 
biggest 
change 




-'i 



50 years 



■ Today more than 
ever, people are 
entitled to value 
received and 
promises 

fulfilled. Thaf goes for funeral service, too. 
Thanks to the Code of Good Funeral Practice, 
this is what you get when you choose a firm 
affiliated with National Selected Morticians. The 
Code makes specific promises, and binds NSM • 
firms to fulfilling them. It promises a wide 
selection in a broad range of prices. Full 
disclosure of information, and written 
confirmation of all arrangements and more. 
So you will know what's new in funeral service, 
write or call for your copy of the Code. There is 
no obligation. It is our promise of better service. 

KEOHANE FUNERAL HOME 



333 Hancock St. 



785 Hancock St. 



773-3551 



Page 24 Quincy Sun Thursday, August 1 , 1974 

MONEY talks- 



No Problem Of 
Excessive Profits For 
Savings And Loans! 



By PtiiNp J. La 
PrwidMit 
COLONIAL FEDERAL SAVINGS 
And Loan Attociation 
of Quincy and Holbrook 

••« MM«kd«y I a-7 i 30 TtiurWsy* 




In these days when reports of 
excessive profits are irritating 
the cost-weary consumer, it may 
be timely to give him a picture 
of income and outgo in the 
nation's savings and loans. 

Ten-year figures from 1964 to 
1973 show an average yield on 
mortgages ranging upward from 
5.78 per cent in 1964 to 7.01 
per cent in 1973. [These figures 
represent the average return on 
the total portfolio of the 
nation's home mortgage loans; 
those who express incredulity 
because of higher loan rates 
prevalent today must realize that 
a considerable portion of the 
total portfolio is represented by 
loans that are many years old, 
paying lower rates of interest.] 

Meanwhile, the average cost 
of savings over these same years 
(representing the average per 
cent of return paid on all 
invested savings], rose gradually 
from 4.19 per cent in 1964 to 
5.55 per cent in 1973. 

The spread between these two 
sets of figures fluctuated 
throughout the decade, year by 
year, as follows: 1.59%, 1.58%, 
1.44%, 1.22%, 1.33%, 1.41%, 
1.33%, 1.30%, 1.43%, and 
1.46%. Old-time managers liked 



to talk about a 2 per cent spread 
as norm! 

This was the margin left to 
S&L managements to pay 
employees' salaries, meet 
building and equipment 
expenses, provide for 
promotional costs, pay Federal 
and State income taxes, add to 
employees' profit-sharing and 
pension plans, and supply 
reserves to fulfill required 
benchmarks. 

Projections for the first and 
second quarters of 1974 
indicated national spreads of 
1.35% and 1.27%, respectively, 
between the average yield on 
mortgages and the average outgo 
for savings. If validated and 
projected for the entire year, 
they would produce a 1.31% 
spread - befter than records for 
1967 and 1971 but well below 
the ten-year average of 1.41%. 

So don't think of S&Ls when 
you are worrying about 
excessive profits. Whether you 
are a borrower obtaining the 
loan to finance your dream 
home or a saver looking for a 
secure and convenient place for 
your expendable funds, you are 
getting a bargain. 



Wollaston Lutheran Nursery 
School Accepting Applications 



Wollaston Lutheran Nursery 
School, which will begin sessions 
on Monday, Sept. 9, is now 
accepting applications for the 
fall term. 

ChiJdren four years old or 
who will be four before Jan. 1, 
1975. are eligible. 



Class sessions are held 
Monday through Friday from 9 

to 11:45 a.m. Further 
iiiforination and rates may be 
obtained by calling 773-5483 

between the hours of 9 a.m and 
4 p.m. 



Army Women Seek Unusual Jobs 



Women in the Army are 
making greater use of the wide 
selection of job skills available to 
them. 

According to local Army 
representative Sgt. Robert 
Nyland many more women are 
selecting job training in 



non-clerical areas such as 
military police, helicopter pilots, 
draftsmen and mechanics. 

"The Army has over 400 
specialties open to women," he 
added. "The only areas 
prohibited to them arc those 
related to combat." 



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SEWING MACHINK CO. 

We Service All Makes Sewing 
Machines and Vacuum Cleaners 
665A Hancock St., Wollaston 
471-5962 



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DRUM PIANO GUITAR 
BRASS REEDS 

WOLLASTON MUSIC CENTER* 

27 Beale St^ Wollaston 
Call 7^3-5325 



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Piano - Oxfian - Guitar 

Electric Bass 

Expert instruction in all styles and levels 

658 Hancock Street 
Wollaston - 472-5717 



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CHECK FOR COUNTY - Commissioner Arthur W. Brownell of the Department of Natural Resources 
presented Norfolk County Commissioners with an $850,000 check reimbursing the County for property 
purchase and renovation. Left to right. County Commissioner Thomas K. McManus [D-Norwood] , 
County Commission Chairman James J. Collins [D-Milton] , Brownell, and County Commissioner George 
B. McDonald [D-Quincy] . 

County To Receive $1.7 Million For 
Wollaston Golf Club Reimbursement 



Norfolk County will receive a 
total of $1,750,000 from the 
Federal Bureau of Outdoor 

Recreation [BOR], reimbursing 
the county's expenses in 
purchasing and renovating the 
Wollaston Golf Course property. 

Commissioner Arthur 
Brownell of the Department of 
Natural Resources presented 

City, Aggie 

School In 

Beautification 

Trustees of Norfolk County 
Agricultural School have 
approved a cooperative 
educational, beautification and 
public relations program 
between its Plant Science 
Department and the city of 
Quincy. 

Plant science students from 
the school in Walpole will design 
and plant flowers in two areas of 
the city -- Fore River Circle and 
the small traffic island in Quincy 
Center. 

The school will supply the 
flowering plants and student 
assistance while the city will be 
billed for the plants used and its 
Park Department will be 
responsible for maintenance. 

Students at Central Junior 
High School, who attended 
Norfolk for two weeks last May 
in a career development 
program, may be employed on 
the project to obtain practical 
experienct; in their home city. 



Norfolk County Commissioners 
Thomas K. McManus, George B. 
McDonald and County 
Commissioner Chairman James 
J. Collins with an $850,000 
check representing the first 
payment from BOR. 

According to Brownell, the 
county is eligible for an 
additional $900,000 over the 
duration of the project. The 



three commissioners noted that 
they expect to apply for and 
receive the full amount for 
which they are eligible. 

The commissioners also noted 
that through the help of the 
federal money, they expect to 
be able to provide the prople of 
the county with the finest 
recreational area in Eastern 
Massachusetts. 



Young Ideas 

Unedited selections from the writings 
o' Quincy's elementary school children. 




WOLLASTON 
CREDIT UNION 

PERSONAL & AUTO LOANS 
NO NOTICE SAVINGS ACCTS. 
EARN 57^% P t R^NN U M 

SPECIAL 
NOTICE 



fio/ PER 

O70 ANNUM 



1^ 

VMRnMnr 



KKAL KSTATK-MORTGAGF.S 
HOMK IMF'KOVKMENTS 

ALL AC ( OINTS FWLLY INSURED 
UNDER LAW BY MASS.C.U. 
SHARK INSURANCE CORP 

651 HANCOCK ST., 
WOLLASTON 

773-3500 773-8600 

OPENMOIM. THURS. 9-8 TUES., WED., FRI. 9-5 



HAIKU 

Look at the flower. 
Mother isn't it pretty. 
Yes it is pretty. 

Beth Barron 

Wollaston School 

Grade 4 

HAIKU 

The snow is falling 

We are making snow men now 

Snow is coming down. 

Scott Price 

Wollaston School 

Grade 4 

HAIKU 

Winter is coming. 

The wind is blowing hardly. 

And it is snowing. 

Kerri McCready 

Wollaston School 

Grade 4 

HAIKU 

Winter is coming. 

The snowmen are singing well. 

See the snowmen skate. 

Carol Jones 

Wollaston School 

Grade 4 

HAIKU 

Nature is pretty 

Snow is falling on the ground 

Snow is beautiful. 

Deirdre Simmons 

Wollaston School 

Grade 4 

HAIKU 

The snowflakes fall down 
And when they fall they are 
fun 

The houses are cold. 

Robert Flynn 

Wollaston School 

Grade 4 



CINQUAIN 

Snow 

White, cold 

Building, throwing, skating 

Happy, unhappy, sad, excited 

Cold 

Visiting 

Warm, cold 

Walk, run, skip 

Sad, happy, good, upset 

Board 

Janet O'Mara 

Wollaston School 

Grade 4 

CINQUAIN 

Winter 

Fun, cold 

Skating, skiing, sledding 

Good, mad, sad, upset 

Fun 

Deirdre Simmons 

Wollaston School 

Grade 4 



SHEA RINK 

We went to Shea rink to skate 
for two hours we had fun on 
Friday 15th of February and I 
had fun to. If you go there I 
hope you have fun to. 

Scott Orrock 

Wollaston School 

Grade 2-3 

SHEA RINK 

We went to Shea Rink. We 
had fun there. Wc skated for two 
hours. We went on Friday the 
15 th. I fell five times. Shea Rink 
was big. I learned how to stop. I 
was slidding. 

James Sullivan 

Wollaston School 

Grade 2-3 



mimfmim>:rmm 



NORTH OUINCY 




TWENTY-NINE FIFTH GRADERS from Massachusetts Fields School in Wollaston walked the Freedom 
Trail and visited the State House recently. They met Senator Arthur Tobin and Quincy's three 
representatives. First row, from left. Rep. Clifford H. Marshall; Fred Spring, chaperone; Rep. William D. 
Delahunt; Mrs. Carol Seltzer, chaperone; Rep. Thomas F. Brownell; Mrs. Irene Stokes, chaperone; 
Senator Arthur H. Tobin; Miss Sandra Weatherhead, fifth grade teacher; Rep. Joseph E. Brett; Mrs. Ruth 
Mahoney, chaperone; Ted Zottoli. Second row, Michael Cronin, Lisa DiLillo, Diana Lambus, Nancy 
Murphy, Linda Morash, Steve Igo, Michael O'Toole, Kevin White and Mary Watson. Third row, Harold 
Seltzer, Ginny Mclntyre, Denise O'Grady, Keith Landry, John Tasselari, Pat Mulvey, Bobby Bostwick. 
Fourth row, Gary Stokes, Bruce Jordan, Keith Colon, Steve Kavanaugh, Susan Mahoney. Fifth row, 
Steve Brandt, Kevin Melody, John Buckley, George Hodges. Sixth row, Steve Burke, Carol Harkin, 
Jackie Purland and Mary Purtell. 

Squantum Assn* Sponsoring Poster Contest 



The Environmental 
Committee of the Squantum 
Community Association, is 
sponsoring a poster contest with 
the theme "Litter and how it 
hurts our community". 

The contest is open to all 
Sguantum rey dents and is 
divided into the following 



categories. 

Children - up to 12 years. 

Teens- 13- 18 years. 

Adults -over 18 years. 

Participants are invited to 
register at the Serv Shop, East 
Squantum St., and pick up their 
poster paper. The contest ends 
Aug. 10 and the entries will be 



judged at the Aug. 12 general 
meeting of the Squantum 
Community Association. Entries 
are to be turned in at the Serv 
Shop by Aug. 10. 

There will be a $5 prize 
awarded for the best poster in 
each category. 



Philip Goodwin Reappointed Notary 



Philip Goodwin of 31 
Densmore St., North Quincy has 
been reappointed a Notary 
Public State Secretary John F. 
X. Davoren announces. 

Confirmation of the 



appointee was made at a meeting 
of the Executive Council 
following submission of the 
renomination by Governor 
Francis Sargent. The term will 
expire in seven years. 



WE CAN HELP 

YOU MAKE THE 

RIGHT DECISION 

WHEN BUYING OR 

SELLING A HOME 



11 



WUJJ 



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418 HANCOCK STREET 

NORTH QUINCY - 471-6647 

Expert Coloring 

SENIOR CITIZEN SPECIALS 

Tuesday & Wednesday 50% OFF - Permanents $8. 

CLOSED MONDAYS - OPEN THURSDAY NIGHTS 



9 




An Old Fashioned Hardware Store Est. 1898 ■ 

TURNER HARDWARE : 

47 1 HANCOCK STREET J 

NORTH QUINCY, MASS. 02171 , 

Glass 472-1167 Trewax , 

Sacrete Products Plumbing Supplies | 

'i Dutch Boy Paints Scotts Lawn Products i 

^\ Benjamin Moore Paints Hand & Power Tools | 
' General Hardware Supplies Agrico Lawn & Garden Products i 

1,100% Pure Hardwood \ 

I Lump Charcoal $Q99 I 
I 20 LB. Bag O 

1 3/8" Black & Decker Drill | 

I Variable speed, complete with carrying case, J ^ ^)9d 
lluffing pads, sanding discs, grinding wheel'*' ^f %# I 

l^rills. Reg. $36.95. ^^ ' I 

])/Vindowsand Screens Repaired Aluminum and Wood ] 

'l OPEN Weekdays 7:30 -5:30 Saturday 7:30 - 5:00 I 

l! Come in and visit with us Paul A Don Nogueira & LitUe Dave 



LUNCHEON 
SPECIALS 

ANO 
SANDWICH 
SPECIALS FROM .99^ 

^«* tTei $3''^ 

^ SOUP' 



po 



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PLAZA 

RESTAURANT 



.•^■^ 



51 BILLINGS RD 

NORTH QUINCY 

FREE PARKING 
IN REAR 



\ 




Thursday, August 1 , 1974 Quincy Sun Page 25 

NQBPA Awarding 
2 Trips To Montreal 



The North Quincy Business 
and Professional Association is 
sponsoring two weekend trips to 
Montreal for two lucky winning 
couples. 

Vacation arrangements are 
being made by QuinWell Travel 
Service, Inc. of 1424 Hancock 
St., Quincy. There is no 
purchase obligation. Just register 
at a participating Association 
member. 

The drawing will be Aug. 29 
at Walsh's Restaurant. 
Registration forms are available 
at: 

Atlas Paint and Electric 
Supply, 401 Hancock St. 

Bob's Speed and Auto Parts, 
496 Hancock St. 

Camniy's Delicatessen, 53 
Billings Rd. 

Curtis Compact Food Stores, 
48 Billings Rd. 

Doran and Horrigan, 
Insurance and Real Estate, 19 
Billings Rd. 

Dudley Furniture and 
Appliances, 15 Billings Rd. 



Francette's World of Nature, 
417 Hancock St. 

Granite Co-Operative Bank, 
440 Hancock St. 

Hancock Bank, 415 Hancock 
St. 

Henry E. Thornton, Real 
Estate and Insurance Agency, 
419 Hancock St. 

Hussey Vacuum Repairs, 23 
Billings Rd. 

Mass. Auto Leasing, Inc., 270 
Hancock St, 

Mister Sub, 64 Billings Rd. 

Naborhood Pharmacy, 406 
Hancock St. 

Nesco, 423 Hancock St. 

President Real Estate, 44 
Billings Rd. 

Quincy Savings Bank, 371 
Hancock Shoe VUla, 40 
Billings Rd. 

South Shore National Bank, 
409 Hancock St. 

Walsh's Restaurant, 9 Billings 
Rd. 

The August 29 drawing will 
take place at Walsh's Restaurant. 



Summer Scene Today At Atlantic 



Summer Scene '74 at Atlantic 
Junior High School wUl present 
an Open House today 
(Thursday), 

Beginning at 9 a.m. parents 
and friends will have an 
opportunity to see and listen to 
many of the activities that 
Summer Scene children have 
been involved with since July 1 . 

The activities will include: a 
play, "Cricket in Park Street", 
presented by the Summer Scene 
players; a baton twirling and 
cheerleading demonstration; a 
gymnastic exhibition by 
elementary and secondary 
students; and an opportunity to 
see learning activities in 
Language Arts, Math, Science, 
and Art. 



rfjisterSUB 

64 Billings Rd 
North Quincy 

Opposite I ushioti Quality Cleaners 

OUR NEW 

TELEPHONE 

NUMBER 

328-9764 

HOT OR COLD 
SUBMARINE SANDWICHES 



OPEN MON. TO SAT. 

10 A.M. TO 11 P.M. 

SUNDAY 2 P.M. TO 9 P.M. 



"The Best In New England" 

FISHER'S 

HOBBY STORE 

Complete Selection Of Models 

For All Ages 
389B HANCOCK ST., NORTH QUINCY 



VA\ 



EVERY FRl. 
12 NOON TO 2:30 p.m. 

WALSH'S 
LUNCHEONjUf^ 

Featuring: 
Your Favorite Cocktails 



Buffet Served From 
12 to 2:30 Every Friday 

* Walsh's Famous Clam Chowder 

* Salads * Assorted Seafoods 

Featuring Sherried Seafood 

* Assorted Hot and Cold Dishes 

* Vegetables - Potatoes ■ Dessert 

* Cheeses - Coffee or Tea 

All this for only $3.00 



WALSH'S 
RESTAURANT 



9 BIUINGS RO. MORTH QUINCY 773.550« 



Page 26 Quincy Sun Thursday, August 1 , 1974 

St. Jude's Hospital Chapter Moves To Quincy 



LEGAL NOTICES 



Danny Thomas, founder of 
St. Jude Children's Research 
Hospital, announces that the 
Greater Boston Chapter of this 
institute moved its office to 
Quincy. 

The chapter office had been 
located in downtown Boston. 
The function of the 
Quincy-based office will be to 
conduct fund raising activities 
throughout the Greater Boston 
area and to assist the other 
chapters throughout the country 
in raising the necessary funds to 
continue the research into 
catastrophic diseases which 
strike children. At St. Jude 
Hospital scientists are 
conducting research into diseases 
such as acute lymphocytic 



ins 
lOld Co 



ouse 



leukemia, solid tumor, 
Hodgkin's disease, malnutrition, 
infection, and many more. 

Said Thomas: 

"Ten years ago, leukemia was 
considered to be incurable; no 
hope was given as no cures were 
known. This is no longer true. 
St. Jude Children's Research 
Hospital is presently 
experiencing a 52 per cent cure 
rate with acute lymphocytic 

Pvt. Mich 
Returns From 

Marine Pvt. Michael J. Cox, 
son of Mr. and Mrs. Coleman V. 
McDonough of 53 Dysart St., 
Quincy, has returned to the 
Marine Corps Base, Camp 
Lejeune, N.C., after a 

s/ 'ar-" 

lohf "'^ ' 

760 MORRISSEY BLVD. 
DORCHESTER 282-7700 



leukemia. All indications point 
to an even greater cure rate in 
the very near future." 

The office in Quincy is 
located in the Faxon Building, 
1245 Hancock St., Suite 39. The 
telephone number is 472-4377. 

Quincy-South Shore residents 
are invited to visit the office. 

The executive director of the 
Greater Boston Chapter is James 
R. Griffin of South Weymouth. 

ael Cox 
Mediterranean 

seven-month deployment to the 
Mediterranean. 

While deployed, he helped 
provide flood relief in Tunisia; 
participated in "Operation 
Nimbus Star", which involved 
the clearing of mines from the 
Suez Canal, and took part in 
amphibious training exercises, 
some of which were in 
conjunction with NATO forces. 






125 SEA ST. .QUINCY 471-1623 






LEGAL NOTICE 

COMMONWEALTH OF 
MASSACHUSETTS 

Norfolk, ss. Probate Court 

No. 74P1866 

To all persons interested in the 
estate of MARYBELLE WARREN, 
a/k/a MARY BELLE WARREN, 
a/k/a Marybelle, a/k/a MABEL 
WARREN late of Quincy in said 
County. Norfolk deceased. 

A petition has been presented to 
said Court praying that DIANE E. 
PEARSON of Rosemont in the 
Commonwealth of Pennsylvania be 
appointed administratrix of said 
estate without giving a surety on her 
bond. 

If you desire to object thereto you 
or your attorney should file a written 
appearance in said Court at Dedham 
before ten o'clock in the forenoon on 
Sept. 4, 1974, the return day of this 
citation. 

Witness. ROBERT M. FORD, 
Esquire, First Judge of said Court, 
this July 24. 1974. 

PAUL C. GAY, 
Register. 
8/1-8-15/74 



The 5th 

CONTESTANT 
FRIDAY 
AUGUST 



NOW THRU SATURDAY 
THE JURI CHRISTIE SHOW 



"P'o Bermuda" 



2nd 



SVJN- E^Tj 

LftoBSTER' 



\ 



J 



■ jTl. 



jtOBSTEBS 

POTATO^ 

DINING ROOM 

CLOSES 4 P.W. MONDAYS 



OPEN 1 1 :30 A.M. To 7 P.M. 
Proper Dress Required 

471-3844 



DIXIELAND SUNDAY 3 TO 7 P.M. 
NEW GROUP EVERY SUNDAY EVE. 

SPfCfALTUES.,WED.JHURS. 

JUMBO SHRIMP AnywoyYouU. 

* Baked Stuffed (Kim's Secret Recipe) 
« Fried Butterfly (Drawn Butter) 

* Scampi (Served on Rice Pilaf) 

751 QUINCY SHORE DRIVE 
WOLIASTON BEACH 

american express 
bankamericard 
Master charge 



Happy Hour Mon. 

Thru Thurs. - 4 To 7 

fREB HOR D'OEUVReS 



SHERIFF'S SALE 
Norfolk, ss. Quincy, May 22, 1974 

Seized and taken on execution and 
will sell at Public Auction on 
Tuesday, Sept. 10, 1974 at 9:15 
o'clock in the forenoon at the 
Deputy Sheriffs Office, 875 Southern 
Artery, Quincy, Norfolk County, all 
the right, title and interest which 
Paul L. Crump of Quincy had [not 
exempt by law from attachment or 
levy on execution) on the 11th day 
of June 1973 at 9 o'clock in the 
forenoon being the day and time the 
same was attached on Mesne Process 
in and to the following described real 
estate, to wit: the land in Quincy, 
Norfolk County, Massachusetts, with 
the buildings thereon, being shown as 
Lot 107 on a plan of land of East 
Milton Terrace, Quincy, 
Massachusetts, by Ernest W. Branch, 
C.E., dated 1914, recorded with 
Norfolk Deeds, Plan Book 79, Plan 
3803, and being bounded and 
described as follows: 

Southerly by Connell Street, 
forty-five (451 feet; 

Westerly by Lot 108 on said plan, 
eighty [801 feet; 

Northerly by Lot 97 on said plan, 
forty-five [451 feet; and 

Easterly by Lot 106 on said plan, 
eighty (801 feet. 

Containing 3,600 square feet of 
land, more or less. 

Terms: Cash John H. Brownell, 

Deputy Sheriff 
8/1-8-15/74 

SHERIFF'S SALE 
Norfolk, ss. Quincy, April 22, 1 974 

Seized and taken on execution and 
will sell at Public Auction on 
Tuesday, Sept. 10, 1974 at 9 o'clock 
in the forenoon at the Deputy 
Sheriffs Office, 875 Southern Artery, 
Quincy, Norfolk County, all the 
right, title and interest which Martin 
C. I innegan of Quincy had [not 
exempt by law from attachment or 
levy on execution 1 on the 8th day of 
August 1972 at 9 o'clock in the 
forenoon being the day and time the 
same was attached on Mesne Process 
in and to the following described real 
estate, to wit: 

A certain parcel of land situated in 
Quincy, Norfolk County, 
Massachusetts, being a portion of lot 
13 on "Plan of land of Dr. Nathaniel 
S. Hunting, Quincy," by George G. 
Saville, C.E., dated March 30, 1898 
and recorded with Norfolk Deeds in 
Plan Book 21, Plan 980 and bounded 
and described as follows: 

Northerly by Whitney Road, 
sixty-two (621 feet; 

Easterly by lot 15 on said plan, 
one hundred three and 26/100 
[103.261 feet; 

Southerly by land formerly of the 
heirs of Aaron W. Russell, sixty-two 
and 06/100 [62.06] feet; and 

Westerly by the remaining portion 
of said lot 13, being land now or late 
of one Bennett, one hundred two and 
04/100 [102.04] feet. 

Containing about 6,364 square 
feet of land. 
Terms: Cash 



8/1-8-15/74 



John H. Brownell 
Deputy Sheriff 



COMMONWEALTH OF 

MASSACHUSETTS 

Norfolk, ss. Probate Court 

No. 74D1085 

To BRIAN J. DOYLE of Parts 
Unknown. 

A libel has been presented to said 
Court by your wife JUNE V. DOYLE 
praying that a divorce from the bond 
of matrimony between herself and 
you be decreed for the cause of cruel 
and abusive treatment and praying 
for alimony, and for custody of and 
allowance for minor children. 

If you desire to object thereto, 
you or your attorney should file a 
written appearance in said Court at 
Dedham within twenty-one days 
from Oct. 23, 1974, the return day 
of this citation. 

Witness, ROBERT M. FORD, 
Esquire, First Judge of said Court, 
this July 24, 1974. 

PAUL C. GAY, 
Register. 
8/1-8-15/74 



LOST PASSBOOK 



The following book No. SS-1334 has 
been lost, destroyed or stolen and 
application for payment has been 
made in accordance with Section 20, 
Chapter 167, General Laws. The 
finder will please return to the 
Shipbuilders Coop. Bank, 1 Granite 
St., Quincy, MA 02169. 
8/1-8/74 



LEGAL NOTICES 

COMMONWEALTH OF 

MASSACHUSETTS 

Norfolk, ss. Probate Court 

No. 74S0311 

To DAVID T. DECOSTA of 
Quincy, in the County of Norfolk. 

A petition has been presented to 
said Court by your wife MARILYN 
DECOSTA of Quincy, in the County 
of Norfolk, representing that she is 
actually living apart from you for 
justifiable cause; and praying that the 
Court will establish that she is so 
living apart from you for justifiable 
cause and by its order, prohibit you 
from imposing any restraint on her 
personal liberty, and make such order 
as it deems expedient concerning her 
support, and the care, custody and 
maintenance of your minor child. 

If you desire to object thereto you 
or your attorney should file a written 
appearance in said Court at Dedham 
before ten o'clock in the forenoon on 
Aug. 21, 1974, the return day of this 
citation. 

* When filing an appearance it is 
not necessary to personally appear in 
said Court on the return day of the 
citation. 

Witness, ROBERT M. FORD, 
Esquire, First Judge of said Court, 
this June 25, 1974. 

PAUL C. GAY, 
Register. 
7/25 8/1-8/74 

COMMONWEALTH OF 

MASSACHUSETTS 

Norfolk, ss. Probate Court 

No. 74D0058 

To JOHN S. WlELKl, JR., of Parts 
Unknown. 

A libel has been presented to said 
Court by your wife KATHLEEN P. 
WIELKI praying that a divorce fiom 
the bond of matrimony between 
herself and you be decreed for the 
cause of cruel and abusive treatment, 
neglect to provide suitable 
maintenance and praying for alimony 
and for custody of and allowance for 
minor children. 

If you desire to object thereto, 
you or your attorney should file a 
written appearance in said Court at 
Dedham within twenty-one days 
from Oct. 16, 1974, the return day 
of this citation. 

Witness, ROBERT M. FORD, 
Esquire, First Judge of said Court, 
this July 2,1974. 

PAUL C. GAY, 
Register. 
8/1-8-15/74 

COMMONWEALTH OF 

MASSACHUSETTS 

Norfolk, ss. Probate Court 

No 74D0975 

To RONALD STANLEY TEE of 
Southampton, Great Britain in the 
District of Hampshire. 

A libel has been presented to said 
Court by your wife ONEFIA HELEN 
TEE also known as ANNE TEE of 
Quincy in the County of Norfolk, 
praying that a divorce from the bond 
of matrimony between herself and 
you be decreed for the cause of cruel 
and abusive treatment. 

If you desire to object thereto, 
you or your attorney should file a 
written appearance in said Court at 
Dedham within twenty-one days 
from Sept. 18, 1974, the return day , 
of this citation. 

Witness, ROBERT M. FORD, 
Esquire, First Judge of said Court, 
this July 15,1974. 

PAUL C. GAY, 
Register. 
8/1-8-15/74 

COMMONWEALTH OF 
MASSACHUSETTS 

Norfolk, ss. Probate Court 

No. 74D1025 

To ITALO DiNUCCl of Parts 
Unknown, 

A libel has been presented to said 
Court by your wife FORENCE L. 
DiNUCCl praying that a divorce from 
the bond of matrimony between 
herself and you be decreed for the 
cause of cruel and abusive treatment. 

If you desire to object thereto, 
you or your attorney should file a 
written appearance in said Court at 
Dedham within twenty-one days 
from Oct. 23, 1974, the return day 
of this citation. 

Witness, ROBERT M. FORD. 
Esquire, First Judge of said Court, 
this July 23, 1974. 

PAUL C. GAY. 
Register. 
8/1-8-15/74 



1 



Thursday, August 1 , 1974 Quincy Sun Page 27 




^•v MAwwv AV4^X4'^n0944C«v«^^^?iSn^g^f^H^C>>»y4vC«'Xy«^Mi■^^ 



LEGAL NOTICES 

COMMONWEALTH OF 

MASSACHUSETTS 

Norfolk, $s. Probate Court 

No. 74P1741 

To all persons interested in the 
estate of HELEN MARY EVANS late 
of Quincy in said County, deceased. 
And to the Attorney General of said 
Comhionwealth, if required. 

A petition has been presented to 
said Court for probate of certain 
instrument purporting to be the last 
will of said deceased by EMILY 
MARY PFRIEMER of Quincy in the 
County of Norfolk praying that she 
be appointed executrix thereof 
without giving a surety on her bond. 

If you desire to object thereto you 
or your attorney should file a written 
appearance in said Court at Dedham 
before ten o'clock in the forenoon on 
Aug. 21, 1974, the return day of this 
citation. 

Witness, ROBERT M. FORD, 
Esquire, First Judge of said Court, 
this July 10, 1974, 

PAUL C. GAY, 
Register. 
7/25 8/1-8/74 



COMMONWEALTH OF 
MASSACHUSETTS 

Norfolk, ss. Probate Court 

No. 74P1765 

To all persons interested in the 
estate of EDWARD H. MacNEAL 
late of Quincy in said County, 
deceased. And to the Attorney 
General of said Commonwealth, if 
required. 

A petition has been presented to 
said Court for probate of a certain 
instrument purporting to be the last 
will of said deceased by MARY R. 
MacNEAL of Quincy in the County 
of Norfolk praying that she be 
appointed executrix thereof without 
giving a surety on her bond. 

If you desire to object thereto you 
or your attorney should file a written 
appearance in said Court at Dedham 
before ten o'clock in the forenoon on 
Aug. 21, 1974, the return day of this 
citation. 

Witness, ROBERT M. Ford, 
Esquire, First Judge of said Court, 
this July 10, 1974, 

PAUL C. GAY, 
Register. 
7/18-25 8/1/74. 



COMMONWEALTH OF 

MASSACHUSETTS 

Norfolk, ss. Probate Court 

No, 74P1803 

To all persons interested in the 
estate of MARGARET MARY 
LYONS late of Quincy, in said 
County, deceased. And to the 
Attorney General of said 
Commonwealth, if required. 

A petition has been presented to 
said Court for probate of a certain 
instrument purporting to be the last 
will of said deceased by DOROTHY 
LOUISE LYONS of Quincy in the 
County of Norfolk praying that she 
be appointed executrix thereof 
without giving a surety on her bond. 

If you desire to object thereto you 
or your attorney should file a written 
appearance in said Court at Dedham 
before ten o'clock in the forenoon on 
September 11, 1974, the return day 
of this citation. 

Witness, ROBERT M, FORD, 
Esquire, First Judge of said Court, 
this July 16, 1974. 

PAUL C. GAY, 
Register. 
7/25 8/1-8/74 



LOST PASSBOOK 

The following Pass Book No. SS-131 
has been lost, destroyed or stolen and 
application for payment has been 
made in accordance with Section 20, 
Chapter 167, General Laws. The 
finder will please return to the 
Shipbuilders Coop. Bank, 1 Granite 
St., Quincy, MA 02169. 
7/25 8/1/74 



MB 



LEGAL NOTICES 



COMMONWEALTH OF 

MASSACHUSETTS 

Norfolk, ss. Probate Court 

No, 74P1738 

To all persons interested in the 
estate of ANN CLAIRE RILEY also 
known as ANN C. RILEY late of 
Quincy in said County, deceased. 
And to the Attorney General of said 
Commonwealth, if required. 

A petition has been presented to 
said Court for probate of a certain 
instrument purporting to be the last 
will of said deceased by LEO M. 
RILEY of Quincy in the County of 
Norfolk praying that he be appointed 
executor thereof without giving a 
surety on his bond. 

If you desire to object thereto you 
or your attorney should file a written 
appearance in said Court at Dedham 
before ten o'clock in the forenoon on 
Aug. 21, 1974, the return day of this 
citation. 

Witness, ROBERT M. FORD, 
Esquire, First Judge of said Court, 
this July 10, 1974. 

PAUL C. GAY, 
Register. 
7/25 8/1-8/74 



COMMONWEALTH OF 

MASSACHUSETTS 

Norfolk, ss. Probate Court 

No. 74D0879 

To PHILLIP D. CUNNINGHAM of 
Parts Unknown. 

A libel has been presented to said 
Court by your wife EMILY I. 
CUNNINGHAM praying that a 
divorce from the bond of matrimony 
between herself and you be decreed 
for the cause of cruel and abusive 
treatment, neglect to provide suitable 
maintenance, and praying for 
alimony and for custody of and 
allowance for minor children. 

If you desire to object thereto, 
you or your attorney should file a 
written appearance in said Court at 
Dedham within twenty-one days 
from Oct. 9, 1974, the return day of 
this citation. 

Witness, ROBERT M. FORD. 
Esquire, first Judge of said Court, 
this July 8, 1974. 

PAUL C. GAY, 
Register. 
7/25 8/1-8/74 



FOR SALE 



SERVICES OFFERED 



MATTRESSES 



MATTRESSES - Immediate 
Delivery. Can you use 
exceptionally good buys on king, 
queen, full or twin mattresses, 
beds, trundles, bunks at discount. 
Brand names. Sealy, Echpse, 
Slumberland, Englander, etc. 
Bedding has been our only 
business for over 20 years. Open 
eves.. Siesta Sleep Shops, 221 
Parkingway, Quincy, Corner of 
School Street. 

T.F. 

PUPPIES FOR SALE 

German Shepherd pups AKC 6 
weeks - parents raised with small 
children. Large father and 
exceptional gentle mother with 
superior blood lines. 472-333 1 
8/8 

POWER & SAIL - 
BARGAINS 

See the Bayliner Cruisers 
and family Runabouts and 
the spectacular new 24" 
Buccaneer Sailboat with 6' 
headroom now on sale at 
Larry's Marine, Route 18, 
South Weymouth and 
Route 3A. North 
Weymouth, 337-6363 or 
337-6050. Prices will never 
be lower. 8/8 



LEGAL NOTICES 

COMMONWEALTH OF 

MASSACHUSETTS 

Norfolk, ss. Probate Court 

No. 74P1758 

To all persons interested in the 
estate of DOROTHY E. RAE late of 
Quincy in said County, deceased. 

A petition has been presented to 
said Court praying that RONALD W, 
RAE of Quincy in the County of 
Norfolk be appointed administrator 
of said estate without giving a surety 
on his bond. 

If you desire to object thereto you 
or your attorney should file a written 
appearance in said Court at Dedham 
before ten o'clock in the forenoon on 
Aug. 21, 1974, the return day of this 
citation. 

Witness, ROBERT M, FORD, 
Esquire, First Judge of said Court, 
this July 10, 1974, 

PAUL C. GAY, 
Register, 
7/18-25 8/1/74 




SERVICES OFFERED 



RT FLOOR CO., Inc. 

cr^te the SMood with... 

LINOLEUM 

& TILE 

KENTILE • AMTICO • ARMSTRONG 

CONGOLEUM 

SOLD and INSTALLED 

HARDWOOD FLOORS, LAID & REFINISHED by our SPECIALISTS; 
Complete Line of Ceramic Tile • Carpeting 

dial . . . 328-6970 

115 S«g«inor« St., NORTH QUINCY 



SERVICES OFFERED 

Landlords, Homeowners or 
Renters. Do you have a cellar, 
attic, garage you would like 
cleaned and don't have the time. 
Or an appliance or other heavy 
object junked or moved to 
another location. Free Estimates. 
Low rate, Call Jack, 773-4650. 



KEYS MADE 

Locksmith on Duty 

GRANITE CITY 

HARDWARE 

1617 Hancock St., Quincy 

479-5454 



T.F, 



LET'S GET 
ACQUAINTED!!! 

Wash-wax-polish your kitchen 
floor, $3.50 [wet stripping 
extra]. Call after 4:30 p,m. 
Ask for David. 479-7270 8/1 



WORK GUARANTEED 
HOUSE PAINTING 

Interior & Exterior, Paper 
Hanging, Vinals & Flock. License 
& Insured. Jim Meehan 

472-6763. 8/8 
INSTRUCTION 

Instruction given in how we were 
prepared by Christ for the Science 
of Jesus' Resurrection. Call 



773-6436 after 7 p.m. 



CARPENTRY 

Licensed builder, 26 years 
experience. Repairs, remodehng & 
additions. No job too small. Free 
estimaiss. Charles J, Ross, 
479-3755, jp 

HALL FOR RENT 

North Quincy K, of C, Building, 5 
Hollis Ave. For information 
>lease call 

328-5552- 328-0087 
328-9822 t.f. 

HALLS FOR HIRE 

Weddings - showers - meetings - 
banquets. Elks Home, 1220 
Hancock St., Quincy, 



472-2223, 



t,f. 



8/1 



INSURANCE 



HOME OWNERS RATES ARE 
LOWER: If you have a basic 
Homeowner's pohcy for $20,000 
and are paying more than $62.00 
a year, call 282-4412 at once. 
Rutstein Insurance Agency, XF. 



HELP WANTED 



ACT NOW 

Join the oldest Toy & Gift Party 
Plan in the Country - our 27th 
Year! Commissions up to 30%. 
Free Sample Kit. Call or write 
SANTA'S Parties, Avon, Conn. 
06001. Tel. 1 [2031 673-3455. 
ALSO BOOKING PARTIES 

7/25 




CHILD CARE 

Rent-A-Parent. Young married 
South Shore couples will care for 
your home and children while 
you enjoy your vacation. 
Interviews and References 
available. 

UNIVERSITY 
HOME SERVICES 
961-1616 RANDOLPH 
449-3590 NEEDHAM 
T.F. 

ARCHIE'S LAWN 
MOWER SERVICE 

l-uarantee Quality Work. Honest 
Prices. No job too small. Free 
Estimates. 92 South Central 
Avenue, WoUaston, 472-8675. 

8/29 



CELLARS and YARDS 
CLEANED, LAWNS MOWED, 
Call anytime 471-1278 

8/8 



Index for 
Classified 

A Services 

B For Sale 

C Autos 

D Boats 

E For Rent 

F .Help Wanted 

G Pets, Livestock 

H Lost and Found 

I Real Estate for Sale 

J Real Estate Wanted 

K Miscellaneous 

L Work Wanted 

M Antiques 

N Coins and Stamps 

O Rest Homes 

P Instruction 



MAIL TO: QUINCY SUN 1601 Hancock St., Quincy 02169 
WANT ADS PAYABLE IN ADVANCE...ca8h must accompany order 
Enclosed is for the following ad to »•"" times 



COPY:, 



Kates: 

Contnct rate: 



$2.50 for one week, up to 20 word, 5^ each additional word. 
$2.25 per week, up to 20 words for three or more insertions of 

the same ad. 
10 Consecutive issues $2.00 per week 
No refund will be made at this contract rate in the event of 

cancellation. 

Deadline: Friday 5 P.M. for the following weeks publication. 
Please include your phone number in ad. 



t 



Page 28 Quincy Sun Thursday, August 1 , 1974 

• Bicentennial Feature 

Life Of John Adams 
To Be Part Of 
Television Series 



Quincy Heritage will furnish 
material on the life of John 
Adams, second President of the 
United States, as part of a 
28-week film series to be shown 
on commercial and educational 
television stations during the 
nation's Bicentennial in 1976. 

The television series is to be 
produced by the Bauman Bible 
Telecasts, Inc., of Arlington, Va. 
and will be titled "God of our 
Fathers". 

The series will examine the 
religious philosophies of the 
framers of the U.S. Constitution 
to see what effect they had on 
the principles that govern the 
nation today. 

Such questions as. What did 
these men believe about God 
and his purpose for human life 
when they were framing the 
United Stated Constitution? and 
What would they say about 
prayer in the public schools and 
other unresolved issues of 
religion and morality which we 
are facing today? will be 
answered in the films. 

In the first 14-segment part of 

Survival Receives 
$22,000 From 
State 

Survival Inc., the 
multi-faceted drug and youth 
program serving the South 
Shore, has received a grant for 
$22,000 from the Massachusetts 
Department of Mental Health, 
Division of Drug Rehabilitation. 

Announcement was made by 
Robert Hassey, Executive 
Director of the Quincy based 
agency. 

The grant, will help cover 
certain salary and rental 
expenses of the program. In 
addition to its out-patient clinic 
at 44 Faxon Avenue, in-patient 
Whiteman House at 1230 
Hancock Street, and crisis clinic 
on Broad St., the agency will 
soon be moving its 
administrative offices to 725 
Southern Artery as well as 
sponsoring the Southwest 
Quincy Teen Council in the 
opening of a drop-in center in 
the southwest section of the 
city. 

"To be able to expand 
services to this level has taken a 
lot of effort on the part of many 
people," Hassey said. "It is quite 
satisfying to find governmental 
agencies recognizing the need for 
alternative programs such as 
Survival and are helping to fund 
our varied services for troubled 
area young persons and their 
families." 

Hassey said there is a need for 
many items of furniture which 
will hopefully be donated by the 
South Shore community to help 
furnish the new administrative 
office. Anyone who can help is 
asked to call 773-6618. 



THE PRICE 
IS UP ON 

SCRAP 

Copper, Brass, Cost Iron 
and Steel 

PDM 

The Nome in Scrap 
on The South Shoro 

175 Intervale St., Quincy 
Fofmerly Haynts Scrap Yard 

472-9251 



the films, the lives of 10 
founding fathers will be 
examined to see how their 
religious beliefs influenced their 
contributions to history. 

In the second segment of the 
series many of the key beliefs of 
the founding fathers will be 
examined in depth asking such 
questions as, for example, 

What did they believe about 
the nature of God? Why did 
they value religious freedom so 
highly, and What were their 
views on private and public 
morality? 

The series is planned for 
initial broadcast over WMAL-TV 
in Washington, D.C., and later 
will be shown over some 30 
commercial and educational 
stations throughout the country, 
and the Armed Forces Radio 
and Television Network. Film 
prints will also be distributed to 
the Naval Chaplains Corps and 
the Air Force Chaplains Corps 
on bases around the world. 

Quincy Heritage will assist in 
the project as the city's 350th 
anniversary and Bicentennial 
organization. 




LOVELY SALESGIRLS display Muscular Dystrophy drawing tickets to Ralph Affanato of Quincy at 
recent Quincy social to aid the Muscular Dystrophy Association's fight against the disease. The girls, all 
from Quincy, are Karen Clapp, Rhonda Zoia, Joan Galasso and Marie Gilfeather. 



Now This Is 
Living 





' INDOOR POOL AND 
^ LOUNGE AREA 



ROOF GARDEN 
WITH OCEAN VIEW 





ELEGANT 

DINING 

AREA 



HEALTH SPA AND 
SAUNAS 



STARTING AT $34,000 



ROYAL HIGHLANDS 

LUXURY CONDOMINIUM 

308 QUARRY STREET, QUINCY 

OPEN DAILY 10 to 6 THUR., FRI., 10 to 8 

848-5828 






■:-r-rrac Crane Public Library 

Box 379 

Quincy, Mass. 02159 



Ilflioas tfm Poilic Linrari 




Vol. 6 No. 47 
Thursday, August 8, 1974 



2.(tiHC4f'4 Ount TVeeiltf Tfeutificifiii 



• COMPLETE QUINCY 
BAY RACE WEEK 

RESULTS PAGES 18-23 




WINNIE THE POOH entered by the Braintree Yacht Club won first prize in the 
Quincy Bay Race Week marine parade. The boat is owned by Paul Kean. 

[Quincy Sun Photo by Laban Whittaker] 





AT GALA NIGHT at Quincy Yacht Club are. from left, William Munroe, president 
Quincy Yacht Club, his wife. Vera; Mary McCourt and her husband, Bernard, 
commodore of QYC and host for the night. 

[Bob Persson Photo] 



TWO BEAUTIES - Janice Lamparelli, 18, [leftl of West Quincy, Miss Quincy Bay 
Race Week of 1974 and Janet McConarty, 16, of Merrymount, first runner-up in 
recent pageant, make pretty picture aboard boat during Sunday's marine parade 
climaxing Quincy Bay Race Week. 

[Quincy Sun Photo by Laban Whittaker] 




CROWD AT SQUANTUM Yacht Club awarts the finish of the marine parade Sunday, 
the climax of the 37th Quincy Bay Race Week. 

[Quincy Sun Photo by Laban Whittaker] 



RENDEZVOUS NIGHT AT Town River Yacht Club was one of the social highlights of 
Quincy Bay Race Week. Among those enjoying themselves were, from the left, 
Kenneth Lavers. vice-president QBRWA and his wife, Irene; Town River Yacht Club 
Rear Commodore James Consos and wife, Jean; William Munroe, president QBRWA 
and his wife. Vera and Town River Yacht Club Commodore Sal Gallinaro and his wife, 
Mary. 

[Bob Persson Photo] 



Page 2 Quincy Sun Thursday, August 8, 1974 




Published weekly on Thursday by 

The Quincy Sun Publishing Company 

1601 Hancock St., Quincy, Massachusetts 02169 

Publisher and Editor 

Henry W. Bosworth, Jr. 

Advertising Director 
John B. Powers 
10^ Per Copy - $4.00 Per Year - Out of State $5.00 Per Year 

Telephone: 471-3100 471-3101 471-3102 

Second-Class Postage Paid at Boston, Mass. 

MEMBER NEW ENGLAND PRESS ASSOCIATION 

The Quincy Sun assumes no financial responsibility for 
typographical errors in advertisements but will reprint that part of 
an advertisement in which thf typographical error occurs. 



John J. Quinn, Jr. E xpected To Get Job 

LaRaia Opposed New Hospital Post 
Because Of 'Adverse Reaction' 



Deployed To Mediterranean 



Navy Seaman John M. 
Tucker, son of Mr. and Mrs. 
Vincent J. Tucker of 23 
Bennington St.. South Quincy, 
has left Charleston, S.C., aboard 
the destroyer escort USS Garcia 
on a regularly scheduled 



to 



the 



deployment 
Mediterranean. 

During the six-month cruise, 
he will participate in training 
exercises with the U.S. Sixth 
Fleet, and visit several 
Mediterranean countries. 



By MARY ANN DUGGAN 

City Councillor Joseph 
LaRaia says he opposed the 
creation of a new supervisory 
post at Quincy City Hospital 
because of "adverse reaction" 
from both hospital personnel 
and Quincy residents. 

LaRaia, who cast the sole 
dissenting vote at a special 
council meeting last Wednesday 
said, "I didn't thmk the position 
should have been created 
because of the feedback I 
received." 

Six votes were required to 
pass the measure and the vote 
was 6-1. Among the six was 
Councillor John J. Quinn whose 
son John J. Quinn Jr. is 
expected to fill the position. 

Also voting for the creation of 
the job were Councillors Dennis 
Harrington, Leo Kelly, John J. 
Lydon Jr., Clifford H. Marshall 



[Add A Room 
ess Than $600* 



»' (• 






A Room 
For Your 

Family In 

The Summer 



ak^i 



..4^3 



A Room 
For Your 

Car In 
The Winter 



\'Hk 



We will adjust the entrance to your garage 
into an attractive and practical entranceway. 
This all aluminum door and screen turns your 
garage into a useful family room for summer 
fun. 

The winter season approaches. The 
entranceway is easily removed in 30 minutes 
and your family room is converted back into 
a room for your car all winter long. 



:•% 



'•Mg-^ 



H*» 



V), 



343 NEWPORT AVENUE - WOLLASTON 

479-1014 



:? 



mc. 



Member South Shore 
Chamber of Commerce 



and Council President Arthur H. 
Tobin. Councillor Wanen 
Powers, who last month voted 
against the appropriation of the 
$11,291 to fund the position, 
was absent at the time of the 
vote. Councillor James Sheets, 
who also opposed the 
appropriation, was away on 
vacation. 

Although no one has been 
officially named to fill the post. 
Hospital Director Harlan L. 
Paine Jr., said: 

"I presume that he [Quinn 
Jr. I will be appointed." 

Paine noted that Quinn had 
been on vacation but was 
expected to return at the 
beginning of this week. '"I'm not 
sure what the procedure will 
be," Paine said. "Whether the 
job will be posted or not." 

He also said that the hospital 
had not yet received official 
notification of the councifs 
creation of the position. But he 
added. "I suspect things will be 
straightened out by the first of 
the week." 

Paine said that the "Night 

Supervisor for Administration" 

would solely handle "the 

non-professional area" of the 

hospital, such as supervision of 

maintenance. housekeeping, 

power plant and security 

departments within the hospital 

during the evening. The new 

supervisor would not, Paine said. 

assume the duties of chief 

executive officer in tne absence 

of the director and assistant 

director. 

Although La Raia had voted 
last month to appropriate the 
funds for the supervisory post, 
he decided to oppose the actual 
creation of the job. He 
explained: 

"At first, my feeling was that 
our {the City Council's] 
function was to pass on 
measures to give departments 
the authority to fill positions. 
But I had phone calls from 
people who felt that the council 
should stop there." 

"Reaction to the position 
being created was adverse from 
hospital people and from the 
citizenry, it got to the point 



where we (the council] were in 
the position of being the 
personnel authority to fill the 
position ourselves because of all 
the notoriety surrounding the 
situation." 

LaRaia added that his 
personal reaction did not affect 
his decision. 

"I don't let my personal 
reaction get involved in the 
vote." he said. "I am there to 
represent the public ... and the 
reaction against the position 
dictated how I voted." 

La Raia said he believed the 
people opposed not only the 
creation of the post but the 
"personality duel" involved as 
well. 

Tobin stepped down from the 
podium before the vote, 
expressing resentment over 
accusations of "playing 
pontics". He said: 

"People should be just as 
willing to help deserving 
honorable candidates for 
positions when they merit the 
help whether or not they are 
related to pubhc officials." 

A published report that young 
Quinn was working on his 
master's and doctoral degrees in 
hospital administration at 
Northeastern University 
triggered questioning phone 
calls, to The Sun, and to radio 
station WJ DA. 

A check by The Sun, revealed 
that Quinn is not registered in a 
master's nor in a doctoral 
program at that university. 
Furthermore, a student cannot 
work toward his doctorate until 
he has first earned his master's 
degree. 

However. Quinn was enrolled 

in University College at 

Northeastern University as a 

part-time, undergraduate student 

from Spring 1973 until Spring 

1974. The associate registrar of 

the university described Quinn's 

program as "general". He 

explained that a student enrolled 

in such an undergraduate 

program must first complete 40 

quarter hours of work before 

matriculation. The student's 

record is then reviewed and 

(Cont'd on Page I ! | 



r 



THE BIGGER AND BETTER 



BARKERS 



n 




s 



our appearance - We'll be 
stocking our shelves for a week or two 

Jiaf 4 7 2-2 f 22 

1459 HANCOCK STREET 
QUINCY SQUARE 



5 



Thursday. August 8, 1974 Quincy Sun Page 3 



Old Coins Unearthed 



Archeologist Team Digging For John Hancock^s Well 



By MARY ANN DUGGAN 

Quincy is a city teeming 
with historicity and tradition. 

Yet even more history - 
centuries old - is being 
unearthed on the grounds of 

Adams Academy, now being 
renovated as a museum oy 
the Quincy Historical 
Society. 

Dr. George Horner, 
archeologist of Quincy 
Historical Society, reports 
that an excavation operation - 
ongoing for two weeks - will 
soon end when picks and 
shovels reach the now 
rock-filled well at the site of 
patriot John Hancock's 
birthplace. 

According to Horner, an 
1880 photograph shows the 
location of the well referred 
to by President John Adams 
as "John Hancock's well". 
Diggers, under the direction 
of Richard Riley, a teacher at 
Quincy High School, are 
probing the area in search of 
the rocks known to cover the 
well. 

Also involved in the 
digging is Daniel Lutts, 
teacher of anthropology at 
North Quincy High School. 

Last week Horner said that 
diggers had reached the 
1880-1885 level when the 
grounds were used as a 
playing field at Adams 
Academy. Then, just as now, 
the boys lost and never found 
loose change dropped from 



their pockets. Horner said 
that excavators have 
unearthed an 1876 penny, 
and 1888 quarter and an 
1882 nickel embossed on the 
back with a U.S. shield. 
Diggers have also found glass, 
pottery and a brick traceable 
to John Hancock's ho